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Demolition in a Historic District?

Does your Historic Preservation Board have the power to review and stop or delay a demolition?


  • Total voters
    5

JCook

Member
Messages
1
Points
0
How does your City handle demolition of contributing resources within a historic district? Particularly, if it is a National Register Historic District and in a small town (10k or larger) :)

Do you have a Historic Preservation Board and do they have the power to review demolition permits and/or stop or delay the demo? Does your Historic Preservation Board require members to be architects or attorneys etc. ...Or does the power of demolition in a historic district rest with your planning department and/or Planning Board?

Trying to gather examples of other jurisdictions as comparisons. Any information is much appreciated!
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,021
Points
34
How does your City handle demolition of contributing resources within a historic district? Particularly, if it is a National Register Historic District and in a small town (10k or larger) :)

Do you have a Historic Preservation Board and do they have the power to review demolition permits and/or stop or delay the demo? Does your Historic Preservation Board require members to be architects or attorneys etc. ...Or does the power of demolition in a historic district rest with your planning department and/or Planning Board?

Trying to gather examples of other jurisdictions as comparisons. Any information is much appreciated!
We have several local and several NR districts (though not necessarily both although several are)
Midwest city >35,000 pop (but not much >)
Yes, our historic commission issues demo permits and there has to be a showing that the building cannot reasonably be rehabilitated if it is a contributing resource
Yes, they can stop and or delay demo permits
Our enabling legislation requires knowledge and skills in preservation and allied arts "to the extent they are locally available"
No, our PC stays out of direct issuance of demo permits (thank goodness)
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,262
Points
35
Small city in Maine ~33,000 pop.

We have a Historic Preservation Commission (HPC) that reviews all façade work in the districts as well as the properties on the historic list that may not be in a district. Signs are done inhouse with my signature, Code and the HPC Chair.

Demolition is only a 6 month delay.

We use the services of a local architect to perform reviews for the HPC.
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
13,548
Points
36
I'm not entirely sure how our historic people do their thing, but they review all demolition permits and have a historic board that reviews assorted requests. I'm not sure if they're required to be architects or not.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
12,446
Points
39
Small city of 25,000 in NEOH.

We have a locally legislated historic district with a Historic Preservation Board.

The HPB reviews and has to approve partial or complete demolitions for any building in the District and we have very specific data submission requirements for someone proposing a demolition.

Luckily, most of the recent demolitions have been for noncontributing buildings, which, here, makes it easier for the applicant.
 

Faust_Motel

Cyburbian
Messages
298
Points
13
10,000 people. One National register district with probably fewer than 100 contributing structures. HPC advises the governing body, who probably could deny, but the supporting zoning doesn't really give them the authority to. Practice has been to accept a letter from a structural engineer on demo cases. But saving a building is almost always feasible, if expensive- it's hard to make a decision without talking about money and hard to set criteria that can be applied evenly and fairly. I'm interested to see what others have on this as we are working to update our rules for our district presently.
 
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