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Architecture Design fitting the occupant

michaelskis

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I think it is no secret that some buildings are designed better than others. Unfortunately, I think architects are too often tying to push the limits and builders and trying to push the profits, so we don't get much in the way of amazing looking buildings and are truly fitting of their occupants. Take the Roy E. Disney Animation Building for example. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walt_...dia/File:Roy_E._Disney_Animation_Building.jpg

Here is a building that house a couple of large assembly spaces, offices, and conference rooms. Not unlike many occupant needs of a school or a few other places. But when you look at it, there is zero question of what it is, and who the occupant is. But I think this is an exception rather than the norm.

What other similar buildings fit this idea of being truly indicative of the occupant and use?
 
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....we don't get much in the way of amazing looking buildings and are truly fitting of their occupants. Take the Roy E. Disney Animation Building for example. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walt_...dia/File:Roy_E._Disney_Animation_Building.jpg

Here is a building that house a couple of large assembly spaces, offices, and conference rooms. Not unlike many occupant needs of a school or a few other places. But when you look at it, there is zero question of what it is, and who the occupant is. But I think this is an exception rather than the norm.

What other similar buildings fit this idea of being truly indicative of the occupant and use?
You mean like the Longaberger Basket Building?
michaelskis-
My question is similar to Doohickie's, only general in scope:
Are you referring to the subject of NOVELTY ARCHITECTURE?
Specifically, buildings/structures whose "outsides" or "facades" closely reflect their occupants' personalities, brands, and/or uses;
while the buildings' "insides" are closely tailored to the occupants' needs and requirements?

Added in:
 
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Maister

Chairman of the bored
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1593608253712.png

The golden arches architectural theme is evocative of French fries. Would that qualify?
 

Hink

OH....IO
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Yes. This is a great example since the make wooden baskets.
It sold in 2018 since Longenberger doesn't have a headquarters any longer.

Peter Ketter, Director of Historic Preservation for Stanvick Architects, said, “It’s going to continue to look like a basket. The owner is excited about the iconic nature of the building and sees it as a positive.”
 
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How do Las Vegas casinos fit into this? (Channeling Learning from Las Vegas and my grad school years.)
Various casinos around the world have been designed with Novelty Architecture: their landscapes; exterior structures; and/or interior structures & interior decorating.

Those casinos' uses of Novelty Architecture have met with widely varying degrees of success, (including, occasionally, no success at all).

You asked about Las Vegas casinos, so I'll focus on that subject.
A very good and to-the-point article written 4 months ago:
The Psychology of Casinos in Las Vegas:
Spaces Designed to Make You Gamble More and Win Less

 

WSU MUP Student

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10,371
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This is the world HQ of Kelly Services:


It's a pretty uninspiring building for the most part but when lit up in the evenings it looks astonishingly like a filing cabinet. I wish Google had some nighttime photos of the building. I'll have to drive by some time and try to get a few shots.

I don't know if the design was intentional or if it wasn't, am I the only one who sees it?
 
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