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Land use: general Detached apartments?

Otis

Cyburbian
Messages
5,165
Points
28
A developer just called me and said he wants to build a detached apartment complex. It would small cottages essentially. We have an allowance for cottage clusters at double the underlying density (which in this case would allow one unit for each 2,500 sf of lot area. He wants to go under our MFD density which would be one unit per 1,200 sf. He says other places (he specifically mentioned Arizona, where he owns multiple apartment projects) allow "detached apartment" developments. That's a new one on me. Does anyone among us have any experience with such things?
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
13,651
Points
38
We do all kinds of apartments in Arizona. For my city we typically just look at the density requirement for the zone and then make sure the setbacks, landscaping, active open space, etc. are met. As always some conditions, stipulations, provisos, and terms apply. Tell him to give you a location for an example and look it up on google. Let me know, I might even know one of the local city planners to give you more insight.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
12,518
Points
40
The developer wants to do a cottage court as rentals, and be able to build them under the residential building code (aka - much cheaper/easier to build).

"Detached apartments' is typical developer/realtor speak for "I don't know the actual term for this form, so I'll make up my own in order to avoid spending 10 minutes on the internet learning the actual term".
 
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DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
13,651
Points
38
We make them build under commercial code. I forget the exact number, but anything more than 3 or 4 and commercial code kicks in. Anything more than 3 and we start kicking in common area requirements.
 

Tobinn

Cyburbian
Messages
314
Points
11
We have two types of residential:
Detached Dwelling (your basic single family residential)
Attached Dwelling (two or more units which share a common wall)

That's about it. A detached apartment is a Detached Dwelling.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
17,550
Points
55
For form-based codes that define building types, there's the cottage court. It's not really a building type, but rather, a site type. Here's how we define it:

"A cottage court is a group of 4 to 12 small detached houses, each with ≤ 1,500 ft² GLA, arranged around a common courtyard or open space area. "

We have siting regulations for both the larger cottage court site, and for the site of an individual cottage.

Lot characteristics: cottage court site
Number of individual cottage lots
Lot width (at minimum building setback)
Common courtyard area (% of site area)
Principal building types

Lot characteristics: individual cottage site
Lot area
Lot width

Siting: all buildings on the cottage court site
Street right-of-way setback: front
Street right-of-way setback: corner side
Interior side setback
Rear setback
Alley setback

Principal building siting: individual cottage site
Front setback
Side setback: party/common wall or zero lot line
Side setback: side yards on both sides
Rear setback
Alley or internal rear laneway setback
Other requirements

Accessory building siting: individual cottage site or common area
Front
Side setback
Alley or internal rear laneway setback
Distance from other buildings

Building height
Principal building
Accessory building
Story height: 1st story
Story height: upper stories
Story height: principal building top story

A Sketchup illustration I used as an explainer (not part of the code)

Untitled-2.png
 

Tide

Cyburbian
Messages
2,715
Points
21
Dan, why are there no numbers in your table (e.g. setbacks)? Did the copy and paste not pick them up? Can you edit, thanks!
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
17,550
Points
55
Dan, why are there no numbers in your table (e.g. setbacks)? Did the copy and paste not pick them up? Can you edit, thanks!
The numbers are different depending on the zone. This was more to explain the concept of a "lot within a lot" for the development type, with dimensions filled in alter. The Powers That Be decided to go with different graphics for the building/lot type, and they're not available yet.

This is still a draft.
 

Attachments

Whose Yur Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
10,494
Points
33
I've seen them. One jurisdiction I worked had that. We lust let it be because they had been there for so long.
 

hipp5

Cyburbian
Messages
116
Points
6
I allow for them in a lot of the plans I write. We call them "grouped dwellings" and typically allow them in the same locations and at the same densities as other multi-unit dwellings. E.g. if a Medium Density Residential Zone allows Multi-unit Dwelling up to 12 Dwelling Units, then I would also allow Grouped Dwelling up to 12 Dwelling Units in that zone.
 
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