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Different road name at intersection?

SlaveToTheGrind

Cyburbian
Messages
1,242
Points
23
Does your code prohibit changing road names at an intersection? If Maple Street is located on the east side of Main Street, do you allow the same road alignment to be called Oak Street on the west side of Main Street?
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
24,842
Points
51
In my fair city Main Street is "0" for east - west streets.

So we would say
east of Main Street it would be East Maple Street and
west of Main Street it would be West Maple Street.

We have 17+ streets that follow this.

Where Main Street turns on compass orientation -
we use NW & SE

We have 10 streets that follow this.
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
27,238
Points
62
Does your code prohibit changing road names at an intersection? If Maple Street is located on the east side of Main Street, do you allow the same road alignment to be called Oak Street on the west side of Main Street?
No, but it should.
 

Salmissra

Cyburbian
Messages
5,655
Points
28
Name does not change at intersection unless it's an intersection with a Highway. Then it's encouraged to keep the same name, but not required.

Changes of directional indication do not mean a name change. So East Main crosses Founders, becomes West Main on opposite side = same street name.

However, if the road makes a 90 or more degree turn, then the name changes. So spaghetti streets get very confusing!
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
13,833
Points
40
We allow it, but it seems to be where the road from city A was called Maple and the road from city B was called Main so the names changes at the intersection. Today all the cities require roads to carry on names based on alignment. So you can have a local road in a neighborhood running clear across multiple cities - we're talking 30 miles or more. It will start and stop however you want, but that street one block up from Maple will always be called whatever road it is regardless of starts, stops, intersections or whatever.
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
11,889
Points
38
No, but it should.
Ditto!





I remember giving my dad directions to our house many years ago (pre-gps days). He asked for street names to follow & I told him that it is better to use landmarks. The 'street' he had to travel changes it's name 4 times from when he turned onto it until he turned off to get to the house. Seriously, all you had to do is keep driving straight - no turns - and it changes names.
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,119
Points
35
We wouldn’t permit it now, but there a couple of places where an old street makes a 90-degree turn, and keep the same name. It’s always fun to write a staff report noting that the subject site is near the intersection of Tom Jones Way and Tom Jones Way.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
17,790
Points
58
It's fairly common in communities and regions that don't use address baselines or pre-approved street name grids, like much of the Northeast. Addressing for a new street in a subdivision will always start close to or at "1". If a later new street has the same starting point and runs in the opposite direction, turning a "T" intersection into a full four-way, there's only a few choices for addressing.

1) Negative numbering. Like the Post Office and E-9-1-1 folks will approve that.

2) Keep the same name as the first street along along the same alignment, and rea-ddress everything on the older street. That ain't gonna' happen.
.
3) Add an "East" or "West" prefix or "Extension" suffix to the new street.

4) Give the new street a new name.

Working back in the Northeast, I'm finding that street naming standards in most communities are non-existent. Suffixes have no meaning, there's a lot of name duplication and sound-alikes, irregular spelling and possessive names are common (a subdivision in a nearby town has something like "Kayden's Lane", for example), you see things like "Hundred Hills Drive" (What's your address? 35 Hundred Hills Drive) ... it's a mess. Nothing like the Western states.
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
27,238
Points
62
Working back in the Northeast, I'm finding that street naming standards in most communities are non-existent. Suffixes have no meaning, there's a lot of name duplication and sound-alikes, irregular spelling and possessive names are common (a subdivision in a nearby town has something like "Kayden's Lane", for example), you see things like "Hundred Hills Drive" (What's your address? 35 Hundred Hills Drive) ... it's a mess. Nothing like the Western states.
Folks can say what they will about how dull and uninspiring midwestern checkerboard grid development is, but it can't be beat when it comes to way-finding and addresses.
 

Big Owl

Cyburbian
Messages
2,400
Points
26
We have a major east-west road that changes names 11 times within our county because it goes through several jurisdictions so the name changes when the jurisdiction changes. There is one place that the road is the boundary between two different cities and each side of the road has a different name. It's messed up.
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
1,859
Points
27
Virtually all addresses in Fort Worth count from downtown courthouse. Streets that go both ways from the baseline are marked with a direction (like North Henderson Street, South Henderson Street). When people give addresses, they often leave off the N, S, E, or W and just say Henderson Street, depending on context. Sometimes that can screw things up pretty good.

There are also numbered grids in some sections of town. Downtown has numbered streets at a slight cocked (not square to N-S-E-W directions) angle, but more parallel to E-W than to N-S. They count south from the courthouse and are called W 1st St./E 1st St., W 2nd St./E 2nd St., etc., depending on which side of Main Street they're on. Interestingly, the street numbers along the N-S streets are out of sync with the numbered streets; in most cities, 210 Main Street would be between 2nd and 3rd Streets, but in Fort Worth it is between 1st and 2nd Streets.

South of downtown, there are straight N-S numbered Avenues, that count up as you move west from Main Street, but for some reason they start at 5th Avenue, and they alternate with named streets (S Henderson St., 5th Ave., S Lake St., 6th Ave, Fairmount Ave., 7th Ave., Hurley Ave., 8th Ave., etc.)

Then north of downtown, there is a second set of numbered streets that count north from the courthouse, also primarily E-W but again at a slightly cocked angle. Those are named the same as the numbered streets downtown, with an N added, and starting a few blocks north of the courthouse, so NW 4th St./NE 4th St., NW 5th St./NE 5th St., etc. At 20th Street, the grid shifts to a straight N-S-E-W alignment, when the count gets that high, since there is no 20th St. going south from the courthouse, the N is sometimes dropped, so W 20th St./E 20th St. and so on. Even though the northern grid counts back to the courthouse, this part of town was not originally part of Fort Worth; it was called Niles City, but was incorporated into Fort Worth in 1923. Niles City is where the Fort Worth Stockyards was/is (no longer a meatpacking district; now a cowboy tourist district).

Once you get away from the numbered grid streets, the numbers continue to count out from downtown- counting east and west from Main Street and north and south from... I'm not sure, but I think an imaginary line running east and west from the courthouse. Every mile from the center is about (but not exactly) 1000 address numbers. So 7500 on a north south street is about 8 miles north or south from the courthouse, or something like that.
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
1,859
Points
27
We have a major east-west road that changes names 11 times within our county because it goes through several jurisdictions so the name changes when the jurisdiction changes. There is one place that the road is the boundary between two different cities and each side of the road has a different name. It's messed up.
We have access roads/frontage roads along the freeways. Sometimes those roads are named for the freeway (addresses will be XXXX NW Loop 820) or sometimes the frontage road will carry the name of the street that was closest to the freeway when the freeway was built. As a result, sometimes on the north side of an E-W freeway it will be one street name north of the freeway and a different street name south of the freeway. Or it could be the same. So you might not think a business could be located at 5XXX West Rosedale Street because Rosedale doesn't go that far west, but for 5 blocks, the West Freeway access road is called W Rosedale. East or west of that stretch, the address would simply be XXXX West Freeway.
 
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