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Dirt Roads

SlaveToTheGrind

Cyburbian
Messages
1,308
Points
25
My mother sent me this link for something that was actually relevant. Usually she sends me stuff that is just an urban legend. She is getting kind of kooky in her old age.:)
 

SGB

Cyburbian
Messages
3,388
Points
26
Very nice.

Note to urban types: you may not get it. ;)

Note to all: turn down your computer speakers, but keep 'em on. Nice music!
 

GeogPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
1,433
Points
25
Urban type: I got it.

I think its all about cultural (d)evolution. I wonder if we will ever return to a more, , in my eyes, civilized world. I have liberal social values but conservative cultural values that this harkens back to.
 

Mud Princess

Cyburbian
Messages
4,896
Points
27
My elderly neighbor told me that our road was a dirt road when our houses were built in the 1940s. Sometimes I wish it had been left that way -- now it's heavily trafficked, and people speed through the neighborhood on their way to their offices. :-(
 

BKM

Cyburbian
Messages
6,464
Points
29
While I have no desire to live as a farmer, I really dislike people who move "to the country" and yet want to live like suburbanites. The roads are always paved, and the SUV traffic goes up exponentially, all so these folks can pretend to be country folks.
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
27,904
Points
70
Jefferson thought the American Republic would exist most virtuously as agrarian society. He didn't think highly of many of the conditions associated with the incipient industrialization of his time (paradoxically, he was somewhat of an inventor himself).
I dunno, there's probably a grain of truth in the whole virtuous agrarian/rural society thang, but to me it kinda sounds sounds too.... Norman Rockwell. Things were never really as good as they're portrayed later - glosses over all the Klan rallies and Deliverance sodomy going on in the background.

I was going to make some sort of generalization about the lower the population density the less friction there is between people and the more 'virtuous' a society tends to be. But then I remembered the Mongol Hordes under Ghengis Khan originated in the empty steppes of central Asia....
 

BKM

Cyburbian
Messages
6,464
Points
29
Maister said:
I was going to make some sort of generalization about the lower the population density the less friction there is between people and the more 'virtuous' a society tends to be. But then I remembered the Mongol Hordes under Ghengis Khan originated in the empty steppes of central Asia....
LOL!

I would also note that many of the densest societies on earth (Holland, Japan, Hong Kong) have relatively low crime rates, while the traditionally rural South has relatively high violent crime rates.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
13,323
Points
49
also urban type that got this (but I grew up in rural northern Michigan)

I liked it, but yeah, rural places tend to breed intolerance and suspicion alot faster than cities (even small cities).

the bucolic rural pics were nice and comfy though :p :-D
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
Didn't anyone notice that one of those so-called "dirt" roads was actually gravel?! What kind of con is this guy trying to pull? I'll bet he ain't even a real 'merican.
 

Duke Of Dystopia

Cyburbian
Messages
2,713
Points
24
Dirt roads are over rated. As is the agrarian life.

I am mesmerized and sort of horrified when I hear the old farm stories he (my dad) tells about eating lard sandwiches while growing up cause they had so little. I can see americas shift from primarily agrarian life with huge families to todays demographic shift of urbanity for the majority.

I would agree that there is a lot worth keeping in our value system from the past, I am not convinced it is dirt roads and cow crap that give us those values worth keeping.
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,251
Points
37
He's our spy at the APA conference and can't respond for himself, but I'd suggest that NHPlanner would have something to say about dirt roads in mud season in New Hampshire. I know my sister-in-law doesn't care for them at all.
 

Seabishop

Cyburbian
Messages
3,838
Points
25
Duke Of Dystopia said:
Dirt roads are over rated. As is the agrarian life.

I am mesmerized and sort of horrified when I hear the old farm stories he (my dad) tells about eating lard sandwiches while growing up cause they had so little. I can see americas shift from primarily agrarian life with huge families to todays demographic shift of urbanity for the majority.

I would agree that there is a lot worth keeping in our value system from the past, I am not convinced it is dirt roads and cow crap that give us those values worth keeping.
My sentiments exactly. Thousands abandoned the rural life for a reason. (Although typical "rural" life in the US is not as hard as it once was.) One of my pet peeves is rural people presenting themselves as the "true" Americans who we all should idolize. Besides, they should keep the benefits of rural living as their secret so all of us city people don't move in.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
18,202
Points
64
Ahhhhh ... more glurge about old-fashioned values. About dirt roads, and corner stores where you could grab a cold Coke from a ice-and-water filled tub. Penny candy. Kids who respected their elders, and called anyone who was older than they were "sir." Not being able to shop on Sunday, because that was the time when we stayed at home to honor Jeebus. Cars that you could fix yourself, but which would die because of vapor lock or any other minor malady. Being able to light up a filterless Chesterfield anywhere and everywhere you wanted. Leaded gasoline. Thalidomide. The right to do business unencumbered by pollution regulations ... the sweet smell of money permeated the air. Commie neighbors ... at least we thought they were, because they drove a Beetle instead of a Detroit-made tank. Colored people who knew their place, stayed quiet, and respected the white man.

Those were good times indeed. :(
 

SGB

Cyburbian
Messages
3,388
Points
26
Gedunker said:
I'd suggest that NHPlanner would have something to say about dirt roads in mud season in New Hampshire.
Been there. Done that. No problem - just leave your snow tires on until the back roads firm up.

Besides, they actually pave the roads down where NHP lives. ;)
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
27,904
Points
70
Dan said:
Ahhhhh ... more glurge about old-fashioned values.... Cars that you could fix yourself, but which would die because of vapor lock or any other minor malady. Being able to light up a filterless Chesterfield anywhere and everywhere you wanted. Leaded gasoline. (
Actual quote from my 92 year old cantankerous great uncle Jack (who was a lifelong rural dweller) "Cars cost so damn much nowadays 'cuz they have all this safety crap like belts and such in 'em. Why, I remember my old model T, the seat was right on top of the gas tank. You had to lift up the seat to put gas in. And if the smell from the gasoline got too strong while you were driving along, why you just lit up a cigar to mask it."
 

Plannerbabs

Cyburbian
Messages
1,038
Points
23
Stuff like this reminds me of what happened to one of my parents' friends--a guy who's been farming for 80-odd years. Some city folk moved way up north to a parcel adjacent (and downwind) of one of his feedlots, then sued because they claimed the smell interfered with their enjoyment of country life. Ummmm---had they never been to the country before, or was their car's air filter so effective that they had no idea what the country smelled like?? B-)
 

NHPlanner

A shadow of my former self
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
9,906
Points
39
SGB said:
Been there. Done that. No problem - just leave your snow tires on until the back roads firm up.

Besides, they actually pave the roads down where NHP lives. ;)
Uh huh. Dirt roads around here are usually class VI roads (no local maintenance, subject to gates and bars). And there are maybe one or two left in most southern NH towns.
 

SkeLeton

Cyburbian
Messages
4,853
Points
26
Dirt roads, can be a problem, specially in cities like Santiago, where the dust that these roads lift with traffic can worsen the air quality quite a bit. And in Valdivia, with the lots of rain we get, it's a mud road more than a dirt road.

Yet... The future is neither dirt nor paved.. it's air! Where's the floating cars that the movies predicted? I want mine now! :p
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
25,162
Points
55
Q. Anybody read any version of the "Code of the West" ?

Larimer County, CO
http://www.co.larimer.co.us/depts/planni/planning/code_of_the_west/

1.9 - Unpaved roads generate dust. When traffic levels reach specific levels, Larimer County treats county system roads to suppress the dust, but dust is still a fact of life for most rural residents.

1.10 - If your road is unpaved, it is highly unlikely that Larimer County will pave it in the foreseeable future. Check carefully with the County Road and Bridge Department when any statement is made by the seller of any property that indicates any unpaved roads will be paved!

1.11 - Unpaved roads are not always smooth and are often slippery when they are wet. You will experience an increase in vehicle maintenance costs when you regularly travel on rural county roads.
 

otterpop

Cyburbian
Messages
6,655
Points
28
Our county has more dirt roads. even County roads, than paved. Montana has more dirt roads than paved, by a huge margin. A lot of the gravel roads and the paved roads are pretty bad -- everyone wants the road fixed but no one want to pay higher taxes for maintenance and repair.

At least here, gravel roads hold up better than paved roads, if the traffic load isn't very high. Frost heave and other winter-related road problems wreck havoc on paved roads more than gravel roads. Of course, come July, when it is very dry, gravel roads create a real dust problem.

Some of the nicest places I've been in Montana and throughout the West are only accessible by unpaved roads. Murray, Idaho, for example. Or Garnet, Montana. Or the North Fork of the Blackfoot River.

Nostalgia over dirt roads and slower times is wonderful. There is truth in those words but they don't tell the whole story. The home at the end of the dirt road may also be harder for emergency services to access, harder to evacuate during wildland fires, and may be a private road that restricts access. That said, I like dirt roads and what they say about a slower pace. I drive those dirt roads and see wonderful places unaccessible by pavement, but I am also thankful when my wheels hit pavement again.
 
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