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Do you have ADD?

Do you have ADD

  • Yes

    Votes: 11 37.9%
  • No

    Votes: 10 34.5%
  • Other

    Votes: 3 10.3%
  • What is this ADD that you speak of?

    Votes: 5 17.2%

  • Total voters
    29
  • Poll closed .

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,175
Points
51
At the moment I have a bad ADD problem… it is not constant... I think it is because I just ate chocolate. Do you have ADD, and how do you deal with it without medication, (or alcohol because I at work)
 

Repo Man

Cyburbian
Messages
2,549
Points
25
I think sometimes I have selective ADD. If something doesn't interest or challenge me, I find it more difficult to....oh look a squirrel!
 

SGB

Cyburbian
Messages
3,388
Points
26
[ot]Our pediatrician told my wife & I the following the other day:

"I thought I heard a story on the news this morning about the correlation between ADD and television viewing habits of children between the ages of 3 and 5, but I couldn't pay attention."[/ot]
 

boiker

Cyburbian
Messages
3,889
Points
26
I was going to type something, but I have no idea what this thread is about now :)

I just couldn't stay focused on topic.



seriously, I don't have it, but my wife battles a somewhat mild case of ADD.

[ot]I, on the other hand, suffer from Arithmetic Deduction Disorder. I can't do math or understand it's logic. What is this number 2 you speak of and how can an undefined quantity of 2 exist? 2 by itself is meaningless.. how can I add a meaningless 3 to a meaningless 2? That's like adding "R" to "E". I demand units.

A friend from college (math major) was challenged by his professor to define the number 1...mathmatecally. He didn't want to know what 1 was as a quantity, he wanted to know how we could prove the existence of the number 1. (WAY over my head)[/ot]
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,623
Points
34
I do but it usually is in the form of multi-tasking and not in form of instant distraction. I get "chatter" in my mind if you will, where I can simultaneously be working through a complex problem, have a pop song lryic running in my head, and deciding what to have for dinner.
 
Messages
7,649
Points
29
Chet said:
I do but it usually is in the form of multi-tasking and not in form of instant distraction. I get "chatter" in my mind if you will, where I can simultaneously be working through a complex problem, have a pop song lryic running in my head, and deciding what to have for dinner.
That is probably not "ADD". Most likely, that is the symptom of a high IQ. ADD is a common misdiagnosis for "bored gifted kid desperately trying to entertain themselves in public school" syndrome. Throw in a kinesthetic learner (who is probably incapable of keeping still in his seat while learning -- moving and thinking must occur in tandem) and you have a recipe for being told by the school "PUT HIM ON RITALIN" (NOT "We think you should consider having him diagnosed. We are concerned for his welfare." etc).

Not that I ever had such a thing said to me when my 16 year old was 8 or 9. :-D
 

SkeLeton

Cyburbian
Messages
4,853
Points
26
Ooo! Ritalin! I remember that! Oh those lovely memories of my childhood..

I'm sorry what's the topic? ADD? mabye, I just call it permanent daydreaming, but whatever... I did have the ritalin treatment when I was like 6.. but that didn't do much nor last long... :p
 
Messages
7,649
Points
29
SkeLeton said:
Ooo! Ritalin! I remember that! Oh those lovely memories of my childhood..

I'm sorry what's the topic? ADD? mabye, I just call it permanent daydreaming, but whatever... I did have the ritalin treatment when I was like 6.. but that didn't do much nor last long... :p
Good thing it didn't last long: Ritalin controls behavior by suppressing blood flow to the brain. I don't want to go into all the details, but: "Can you say Permanent Brain Damage?" I think it is a crime to pass out Ritalin like candy to children, who kind of need their blood flow to their growing brains. Sigh.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,852
Points
39
I don't have ADD. I just get hyper and can't sit down when I'm home, unless I'm reading a great novel and then I become comatose for hours. When my son was in kindergarten, my mom was convinced he had ADD, but he was going thru issues related to the divorce, and luckily we had a great principal who worked with him and said he was OK.
 

mgk920

Cyburbian
Messages
4,202
Points
26
Michele Zone said:
That is probably not "ADD". Most likely, that is the symptom of a high IQ. ADD is a common misdiagnosis for "bored gifted kid desperately trying to entertain themselves in public school" syndrome. Throw in a kinesthetic learner (who is probably incapable of keeping still in his seat while learning -- moving and thinking must occur in tandem) and you have a recipe for being told by the school "PUT HIM ON RITALIN" (NOT "We think you should consider having him diagnosed. We are concerned for his welfare." etc).

Not that I ever had such a thing said to me when my 16 year old was 8 or 9. :-D
That sounds a lot like me. I was adopted into a strictly 'blue collar' family and was running my adoptive parents ragged with my curiousity of the world by the time I was 3 or 4. Things like power lines, roads and railroads enthralled me by the time I was 2. Since I didn't fit the stereotypical blue collar 'mold' (do all of the routine chores when the clock/calendar say to do them and then spend 40-45 years in the bowels of a factory, with making supervisor being considered the epitomy of 'success'), I ended up being diagnosed as 'hyperactive' and subsequently wired on Ritalin from 1st grade through junior HS.

Over the past few years, I have become more and more convinced that that diagnosis and its treatment was sadly wrong, with some form of autism appearing to be a better 'fit'. This misdiagnosis has held me back for many years and I fear that I may never fully overcome it.

Also, although I have never taken an official test, the best 'fit' for me on the Myers-Briggs personality profile is a fairly strong 'INTP'.

Mike
 
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mgk920

Cyburbian
Messages
4,202
Points
26
Michele Zone said:
Good thing it didn't last long: Ritalin controls behavior by suppressing blood flow to the brain. I don't want to go into all the details, but: "Can you say Permanent Brain Damage?" I think it is a crime to pass out Ritalin like candy to children, who kind of need their blood flow to their growing brains. Sigh.
I fully agree with you.

This over-use of Ritalin (a schedule II controlled substance, BTW) may also be a long term detriment to our nation and its strength, as I recall reading a few years ago (I may be wrong here) that the USA's military services will '4-F' any potential recruit whom has taken the stuff.

Mike
 
Messages
7,649
Points
29
mgk920 said:
I fully agree with you.

This over-use of Ritalin (a schedule II controlled substance, BTW) may also be a long term detriment to our nation and its strength, as I recall reading a few years ago (I may be wrong here) that the USA's military services will '4-F' any potential recruit whom has taken the stuff.

Mike
That has changed: I think it is now that if you have taken it past age 12 or something. There are ways around it.
 

martini

Cyburbian
Messages
678
Points
19
Yep, pretty sure I've got a mild case of it...sorry lost my train of thought there...Actually, I have trouble staying with large, involving tasks. Don't put me on that Comp plan project all by myself. Give me more smaller stuff, and I'll be dandy.
 
Messages
7,649
Points
29
mgk920 said:
That sounds a lot like me.
I don't want to hijack the thread. If what you are saying is right (as in "a correct interpretation of events") then you would be classified as "twice exceptional". My homeschooling site is called "Michele's World of (Twice) Excpetional Homeschooling". I have begun to write about Asperger's Syndrome (a mild form of Autism). There is an 8 or 9 page article there -- a brief attempt to summarize some of what I understand.

I get myself in hot water on such topics on a routine basis in homeschooling circles because folks who like having a label and a drug for their difficult child hate my guts. Folks who don't like having a label and a drug and want more enlightened answers ... "beg" me to keep running my mouth and going down in flames over the hostility of those who don't want to hear my take on it.

I recently ran across a book by a mom of three "problem" kids. She argues there is a lot more in common between ADD and autism than there are differences but that the doctors and other professionals choose to emphasize the differences and downplay the commonalities. You might want to look for that book.

I have strong reason to believe that some of the damage that was likely done to you can be reversed, even after adulthood, by raising the bar on how you eat and by using vitamin supplements.

Anyway, the website is http://califmichele.com and the part you probably will find most rellevant is http://califmichele.com/lab.html. On that page, The LeaD Works and "A little bit of chemistry" are both sections you might find useful. I have an article about vitamin therapy in "a little bit of chemistry" and The LeaD Works has my 'short' (8 or 9 page) attempt to begin recording what I understand about autism, asperger's, et al.

You are more than welcome to contact me privately. I couldn't begin to summarize my research and hypotheses into such issues in this forum.
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,995
Points
31
I'd have to disagree with the popular "its all crap" school of thought when they discuss ADD. There are some people who have bloomed in many ways once they finally got the meds right, I’m one of them. Thank god for those that have recognized that the child with ADD may grow up to be an adult with ADD that has just developed good coping skills. Believe me when I say I looked at all the alternatives I could find for this condition for 38 years before giving meds a try. I feel just as sharp as before, I can just read "signals" far better now that mind is not racing (a very accurate description of my first 38 years). It's good to be a little less manic and a little more introspective. Plus, the meds are worth a fortune down at the truck plaza! ;)
 
Messages
7,649
Points
29
el Guapo said:
I'd have to disagree with the popular "its all crap" school of thought when they discuss ADD.
Just to clarify: I am not of the "it's all crap" school of thought. I voted 'What is this ADD of which you speak?" as a tongue in cheek commentary on the fact that I think it is not well-understood, the "experts" aren't real sure what in heck it is, it ends up being a catch-all phrase for a set of symptoms that can have multiple causes, etc.

ADD and Aserpger's have a lot in common -- and they both have overlap with "symptoms" of high IQ. Anecdotally, extremely high IQ seems to be commonly associated with being "different" in other way -- so much so that I believe that being 'twice exceptional' is the Norm, not the exception. There is anecdotal evidence that the more extremely high the IQ, the more likely there are to also be other issues. Bill Gates and Einstein both have symptoms of Asperger's. Asperger's and ADD are hard to distinguish and when Asperger's is misdiagnosed as ADD and a child is put on Ritalin, it is really tragic because Ritalin suppresses blood flow to the entire brain and Aspie's have high blood flow to some parts of the brain but low blood flow to other parts -- so these kids can be seriously harmed by Ritalin. Additionally, some studies show significantly better results from vitamin supplements and exercise than from giving hyper kids Ritalin.

I am apalled at the casual manner in which such diagnoses are treated. I am apalled that "drugs" are the FIRST response in so many cases when other, safer things could be tried that have a track record of success for SOME of these kids. No, vitamin therapy, etc, is not successful for all such kids. But it is so much safer than Ritalin that I feel strongly that it should be tried first. Ritalin should be a "last resort" for CHILDREN. An adult brain is a whole other ball game.

Many Aspies also benefit from drugs. Their brains are more unevenly developed than other brains -- but their brilliance and their "weirdness" are inseparable. If you could make them stop being Aspie, they would lose far more than their issues with "social skills" (the big issue that most literature seems to focus on). But I have gotten extremely good results with my kids without such drugs. If there ever comes a time when drugs seem meritted, I will weigh that option seriously. But I will also know that if we go that route, it truly is an absolute necessity and not a mere convenience for mom and the public school system.

I am ultra conservative when it comes to giving mind-altering drugs to children. You are not a child and you clearly turned to this as a "last resort". I am glad it has improved your life. But the definition of ADD is one of ELIMINATION -- there is no affirmative "test". If you have these issues and they cannot find another explanation, you fit the official defintion in the DSM 4. Few kids who get this label have been gone over with a fine enough toothed comb to genuinely claim that all other possible explanations have been exhausted. So it is a diagnosis that I am skeptical of, not because it isn't real but because, like Ritalin, it is also passed out like candy.

FWIW: my oldest son -- who I know is NOT ADD due to testing he had in Kindergarten, also is plagued by a restless mind that darts around excessively. He finds that music (without lyrics -- he listens to wav files of favorite video game music) helps regulate the flow of thoughts in his mind. His IQ is also most likely over 200 -- probably substantially so, but due to other factors, including his many handicaps, we will never be able to say with any certainty exactly what it is. When he gets his bottomless hunger for knowledge fed adequately, he is not nearly so miserable and prone to insomnia. There is quite a lot of anecodtal evidence that people of very high IQ are prone to insomnia when their genuine need for intellectual stimulation is not met. I know a LOT of people who suffer from an overactive mind and who are not ADD -- but who appear to be so when insufficiently mentally challenged by their work and environment.

So don't shoot, eG -- I am "on your side". :) Besides, you would miss my raunchy sense of humor. ;-)
 
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el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,995
Points
31
Michele Zone said:
Just to clarify: I am not of the "it's all crap" school of thought. ....So don't shoot, eG -- I am "on your side". :) Besides, you would miss my raunchy sense of humor. ;-)
Michele,
Nope, not shooting at you or anyone here. I just hear the lament on occasion in person. So, once again not shooting at anyone...oh look a squirrel.... ;)
 

Gedunker

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41
Knowing your physician, and your physician knowing you, makes a gigantic difference. My pediatrician knows me, knows my kids. When we were concerned about some behavior issues with my son, she counseled a cautious approach. Her take has borne fruit and he is doing very well, thank you. (The opposite, of course, comes when she decides to be very agressive. Then you know something is up 8-! )

I worry about folks in the health mills -- places where they line 'em up and diagnose them hour after hour. "Oh, teacher says Janie can't sit still? Ritalin! NEXT!"
 
Messages
7,649
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29
el Guapo said:
Michele,
Nope, not shooting at you or anyone here. I just hear the lament on occasion in person. So, once again not shooting at anyone...oh look a squirrel.... ;)
Well you can't be talking about me -- I shaved recently. I am not that furry today. :-D
(Besides, I was just being playful with my closing line -- you are fun to play with. :) )
 

Dan

Dear Leader
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Messages
18,706
Points
69
I hope you folks who are claiming to have ADD have gotten a formal diagnosis, and not just saying that because you got bored at a meeting and felt the need to get out of your chair for a few minutes. I can't believe that half of all planners have ADD, but it is more prevalent in the US; not because teachers are more quick to recommend Ritalin to a hyperactive kid, but supposedly because those with a sense of wanderlust and adventure were more likely to emigrate here than those that remained behind in the old world. It's genetic, so it got passed down from our ancestors.

I'll be blunt, and say that after years of therapy, I was formally diagnosed with ADD about three years ago. I'm textbook PI (not PH), I'll spare you the complete list of symptoms. My Myers-Briggs personality type is ENFP (borderline E; could just as well be an I); most diagnosed with ADD are *N*P, with the majority of those ENFP and INFP.

The brain chatter with PI ... it doesn't stop. That's really the worst part; you're always internally talking to yourslf. It's not like you're hearing voices telling you to kill people; it's just non-stop thinking, which can be quite tiring.

So, how does it affect me in planning? I can't work in an environment where there is constant interruption that is beyond my control; where the phone is always ringing, customers are always coming into the office, and so on. I also find myself excruiatingly bored if I'm doing pure current planning. My current job is nearly perfect; there's a lot of work, but it's mostly comprehensive/long range planning, I have a real office with four walls and a closing door, the phone doesn't ring all the time, and there's very little unscheduled public contact. The office environment is quiet, so I can maintain an open door policy and not be that distracted. I get the chance to be creative, which is something I don't have the opportunity to do when I'm stuck reviewing building permits for zoning compliance.

The true sign of having ADD, though ... you have ADDdar. You can pick ADDers out of a crowd, and for some reason you click with them better than with "normals."

Ultimately, though, meds are the way to go. I'm taking Straterra, which isn't a stimulant. It's okay, but there seems to be something missing compared to Concerta (time-release Ritalin).
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
25,803
Points
61
:-$ How do low (<80) Blood Glucose levels relate to ADD ?
 

Dan

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JNA said:
:-$ How do low (<80) Blood Glucose levels relate to ADD ?
I don't know. My blood glucose level is normal.
 
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29
JNA said:
:-$ How do low (<80) Blood Glucose levels relate to ADD ?
As I understand it:
ADD originates in the brain.
Low blood sugar (aka "functional hypoglycemia") is a somatopsychic condition which originates elsewhere in the body but the chemicals involved can and do effect the brain. (Somatopsychic means the opposite of psychosomatic. A psychosomatic condition is a mental issue that leads to physical symptoms. A somatopsychic condition is a physical issue which has mental consequences.)

Low blood sugar can adversely affect the ability to focus due to what amounts to "starvation" of the brain combined with high levels of adrenaline in the system. When blood sugar levels drop too low, the body releases adrenaline in order to access stored sugars (I believe from the liver). However, the adrenaline also has its "usual" effect on the body of "fight or flight" reaction. If you are routinely subjected to this, it can make you somewhat paranoid.

Low blood sugar tends to interfere with getting adequate sleep, can cause other symptoms like itchy skin, and can leave one on a daily emotional roller coaster ride, as one's blood sugar spikes then plummets again and again.

The cyclical nature of the problem is usually due to the fact that when your blood sugar bottoms out, the body craves sugar as a 'quick fix'. However, people who suffer from functional hypoglycemia typically overproduce insulin and are hypersensitive to sugar. So, when they consume sugar, their body overreacts, dumps a lot of insulin into the blood stream, which quickly burns up the sugar and leaves one with even lower blood sugar levels than when they tried to "fix" it by having a candy bar.

When I did the research on this (21 years ago), the only known treatment for it was a stringently controlled diet and high doses of vitamins. Perhaps things have changed but I haven't heard anything new. However, my severe and chronic issues with hypoglycemia dramatically improved after my underlying genetic disorder was ID'd and I was put on enzymes to help me properly digest and absorb my food. I am no longer essentially starving on a full stomach anymore and my hypoglycemia is now a relatively minor issue.

The classic profile/proof for hypoglycemia is a blood glucose test in which they measure your blood glucose level, then give you glucose (liquid, I think) and measure your blood sugar level at regular intervals over the next 90 minutes or 2 hours or thereabouts. They are looking for two things: a dramatic spike upwards followed by a dramatic plunge. Normal people experience a more gradual rise and fall of their blood sugar.

Changes in diet can make a huge difference in quality of life for someone with functional hypoglycemia.

Anything else you want to know about it? :)
 

boiker

Cyburbian
Messages
3,889
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26
My wife has battled hypoglycemia since she was 12. MichelleZone, I commend your research into the problem. My wife and I had believed that her hypoglycemia had been starting to come under control the last couple years. Mainly, because the "shakes" had stopped when she had severe reactions. However, you're descriptions of the symptons has opened my eyes to some problems she's been having....specifically with sleep.
 

GeogPlanner

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Messages
1,433
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25


i've got hypothyroidism and if i forget to take my meds, i get a bit foggy and find it hard concentrating. before all this, i thought that i was losing my mind and called my doc and he checked my thyroid levels and upped my meds and its been great ever since. i can read more than 4 pages at a time in a book.

anytime your body lacks the ability to regulate a chemical (hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia included), the brain is a bit off. hypoglycemia causes people to slow down and confused and hyperglycemia makes you a bit...energized and loopy...both of these present as altered mental status in the early stage and progress.
 
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OT: coping with low blood sugar (for boiker's wife)

boiker said:
My wife has battled hypoglycemia since she was 12. MichelleZone, I commend your research into the problem. My wife and I had believed that her hypoglycemia had been starting to come under control the last couple years. Mainly, because the "shakes" had stopped when she had severe reactions. However, you're descriptions of the symptons has opened my eyes to some problems she's been having....specifically with sleep.
There is a lot more information out there now than when I did the research when I was 17. For example, there are glycemic indexes on the internet for common foods which can be useful in addressing the dietary issues.

A few tips that should help:
Liquid sugar is like mainlining a drug for someone with functional hypoglycemia because rate of absorption significantly affects how severe the body's reaction is. This is part of why I drink so much diet soda. I sometimes get weird reactions when I order diet coke and a slice of cheese cake, but my body can handle the occasional piece of cheesecake, it cannot handle liquid sugar. Period.

The cheesecake example brings me to another point: when she has been "bad" and imbibed sugar, something high in protein and NATURAL fats (like cheese, milk, butter) NOT fats from deep frying etc, can help to counter-act the problem as quickly as physiologically possible.

Because of the issues with liquid sugar, I rarely drink fruit juice. It isn't quite as bad as soda but it is problematic.

If she hasn't done so yet, she (and you) should learn all the various names for sugar, such as: lactose, fructose, dextrose, glucose, sucrose, honey, corn syrup, etc ad nauseum. And then read labels like crazy. She shouldn't put anything in her mouth that she hasn't read the label on. MOST "crackers" contain so much sugar that they are really not-so-sweet cookies. There are only a few brands of crackers I buy. A good cracker is a perfectly acceptable substitute for bread in a meal. Most crackers do NOT fulfill that function. And "whole wheat" crackers are sometimes the biggest offenders: they are sweetened to a ridiculous degree in order to market them to the twisted American "white flour, white sugar" taste buds.

As a rule of thumb: the less processed the food, the better. Whole grain breads rather than white breads, raw fruits and veggies rather than cooked, cooked fresh veggies rather than canned, etc.

She should have a high protein, somewhat fatty snack just before bed. I usually have a sugar-free carnation instant breakfast. I have a friend who usually has a hunk of cheese. If she cannot give up sugar completely, she should have her desert at lunch time. The last 6 hours before her usual bedtime need to be a "sugar free zone" as stringently as possible. That can make a big difference in her sleep issues.

It takes several days of improved diet to begin evening out the blood sugar levels. The improvement is not usually instantaneous. It always took me at least 3 days to begin getting a real pay off. The longer she is consistent about her diet, the more her twitchy pancreas will likely calm down.

If her shakes continue to mysteriously improve "for no apparent reason", she may be a candidate for becoming diabetic in the future and should discuss that with a doctor at some point. My hypoglycemia slowly got better over the years without any treatment. Then my genetic disorder was ID'd. I have been informed that, if I live long enough, I will almost certainly become diabetic. That is typical for my genetic disorder and has to do, in part, with thickened mucous gunking up the ducts from the pancreas and blocking its release.

I hope that helps.
 

DA Monkey

Cyburbian
Messages
84
Points
4
My wife claims that I suffer from ADD but I have never bothered with diagnosis or medical treatment, I just am.

Consequentially, 2 of my four kids have been diagnosed as ADD and 1 ADHD and one is too young to tell at this point. My family doctor did the diagnosis and he knows us real well.

Do we use medical treatment such as ritalin or dexamphetamines - no, although it has been strongly pushed on us. However, we have no real issue with the drugs and I allow my kids to decide for themselves (after paediatric advice).

My own personal beliefs tend towards the "complex society theory" - that is we ,lately, have discovered some people dont fit the mould or do well in a systematic style of life and learning (such as school). As we have discovered this thing and dont truly understand it we categorise it (through an incomplete list of symptoms that may overlap other not very well understood syndromes/categories) and then seek to treat the perceived "problem" through medication that regulates/adjusts the symptoms (without having understood the nature of the thing first - for instance take the earlier treatment of "sweating" out a temperature or sucking out snake venom or even the blaming of epileptic siezures on possession by demons).

As we learn more about the thing itself, we also develop sub-categories etc to explain variations (such as ADHD).

The concept behind the theory being the more ordered and controlled society becomes, the more we try and define the acceptable norm and seek to have people conform to that norm.

Im probably wrong in a lot of the above stuff but it works for me.

I like me the way I am, I love that my kids "bounce off walls", try to do 1000 things at once, run everywhere and all the things that make them unique. I also understand society has rules and generally those rules need to be followed. The concept of restrictions and acceptable behaviour can be taught to dogs and people :)

I guess my family and I just dont fit in the world were building - big deal, who wants to fit anyway. :-D
 

Globe

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Messages
26
Points
2
This is so funny! I was searching something for someone and I stopped to read this. They just came in here to see if I found their addressing issue and I'm reading about ADD. Ha-ha!!!
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,329
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31
Katie has ADD. Usually it is pretty funny.....sometimes, though, the lack of focus leads to an unpaid bill or a stove left on, etc.

Bear
 

LadyBuc

Cyburbian
Messages
198
Points
7
ADD is a common misdiagnosis for "bored gifted kid desperately trying to entertain themselves in public school" syndrome. Throw in a kinesthetic learner (who is probably incapable of keeping still in his seat while learning -- moving and thinking must occur in tandem) and you have a recipe for being told by the school "PUT HIM ON RITALIN" (NOT "We think you should consider having him diagnosed. We are concerned for his welfare." etc).

Not that I ever had such a thing said to me when my 16 year old was 8 or 9. :-D
I believe that you are confusing ADD with ADHA. These are, contrary to common belief, two separate ailments. ADD does not make you jump around, throw furniture, and not be able to sit still. The "H" stands for "hyperactive". Most adults do not have this form. They have actual "ADD". The reason I know this, is because both my daughter and myself have been diagnosed with it.
When she was in 6th grade a doctor told me she needed to be on Adderal. I thought all this medication stuff was a bunch of cr*p and decided to take her off myself. After 3 miserable years, and her "parking" for a year in Middle School, a friend (she is a Psychiatric Nurse), told me once more that my daughter needed Adderal. This time I took the advice and Stephanie has not had a GPA under 3.0 since.
While she was in a session with her Dr. I decided to get tested. ADD is hereditary and I happened to notice that I answered a lot of question the same way my daughter did (silent of course). I had also always been terrible in school and had to work hard for grades that a mediocre student should have had no problem with. Go figure, I did not know that there was something wrong with how my brain dealt with new information.
I am very grateful to whomever decided that something could be done for people like us, and also angry at people who have no clue badmouthing the meds because of misinformation or abuse by a few. Personally, I could kick myself for not making it easier on my daughter years ago. She suffered through school for no reason, other than my not wanting to "medicate my child". She has good grades now, she is happy, she can focus on individual tasks (whether academic or social), and the pressure is as good as gone.
Also, I have never in my life had a blood sugar problem ;-)
 
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I believe that you are confusing ADD with ADHA. These are, contrary to common belief, two separate ailments. ADD does not make you jump around, throw furniture, and not be able to sit still. The "H" stands for "hyperactive". Most adults do not have this form. They have actual "ADD". The reason I know this, is because both my daughter and myself have been diagnosed with it.
I wasn't confusing anything. The title of the thread says "ADD". I considered writing "ADD/ADHD" and talking a little about the differences. I decided most people wouldn't be that interested and it added unnecessary length.

Also, I have never in my life had a blood sugar problem ;-)
I never suggested there was a connection between the two. Someone else inquired if there was and I basically indicated that, to the best of my knowledge, there isn't.
 

luckless pedestrian

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I have many close friends with ADD kids and they laugh at this joke:

How many kids with ADD does it take to screw in a lightbulb?









...Hey, ya wanna go ride bikes?

I think I had it as a kid undiagnosed.
 
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