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Places 🏙️ Do you have an accent?

michaelskis

Cyburbian
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21,322
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61
About... and some other words make me sound like I came from our Northern Neighbor.

Watch Escanaba in Da Moon Light and you will understand.
 

Breed

Cyburbian
Messages
589
Points
17
I've been told that I have an accent, but only with certain words. I don't know what kind of accent it would be though.

The only word I can think of at the moment is the word, "Boston." I've been told that I pronounce it like there's a W in it... as in Bwoston.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,843
Points
40
It is always fun (and sometimes nauseating) to hear Yankee transplants try to master "Ya'll". You get it or you don't.
 

jestes

Cyburbian
Messages
230
Points
9
Lord yes do I have an accent. Having lived in South Mississippi for 33 of my 37 years I have definitely developed what could best be described as a drawl. The only problem is that I have quite a bit of South Louisiana (Cajun) heritage so most people in Mississippi that I know think that my accent sounds like a cross between a southern accent and a cajun accent - or a cross between a red neck and a coon a$$...just call me a red a$$!!
 

Zoning Goddess

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13,843
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40
RichmondJake said:
I can't say it. I will never say it. I don't even know what it means.

It's the alternative to "youse guys" for persons of a certain social status. Sigh. You're just gonna have to learn it unless you want all your citizens to think you're a dumb Yankee. ;-)
 

Richmond Jake

You can't fight in here. This is the War Room!
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18,300
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45
Zoning Goddess said:
It's the alternative to "youse guys" for persons of a certain social status. Sigh. You're just gonna have to learn it unless you want all your citizens to think you're a dumb Yankee. ;-)
Hey, you told me I'm not a Yankee because I'm from the west coast. Change your mind already? (As I recall from my CA history classes, we were lured into the Union because of our gold....oops, am I treading on thin ice here?)
 

biscuit

Cyburbian
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3,899
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25
jestes said:
Lord yes do I have an accent. Having lived in South Mississippi for 33 of my 37 years I have definitely developed what could best be described as a drawl. The only problem is that I have quite a bit of South Louisiana (Cajun) heritage so most people in Mississippi that I know think that my accent sounds like a cross between a southern accent and a cajun accent - or a cross between a red neck and a coon a$$...just call me a red a$$!!

Friend of yours? ;-)
baboon.jpg
 

Whose Yur Planner

Cyburbian
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12,234
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49
Michele Zone said:
Oh, gee -- you mean that plus all the stuff Gedunker said is also Hoosier? I just thought it was cuz daddy grew up on a farm and dropped out of the 9th grade. Clearly, I haven't spent 'enough' time in Injiana. I don't knows me own heritage.

Indiana accents depend on were you are at and from. I'm from the northern part of the state w/ my family coming from Indiana side of Chicago. My accent is a mix of Chicago and nothern Indiana/southern Michigan/northwest Ohio. When I go back home, I'll slide back into the Chicago accent in a heartbeat. My accent is slightly different than Central Indiana and very different from southern Indiana, which is a Kentucky accent. My accent also has German undercurrents because of my family and northern Indiana was/is strongly German.
 

michaelskis

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21,322
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61
I just remembered, When I have a few too many, I start to sound like I am living in Philly again... How youuu doin'?
 
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1,260
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22
They say midwesterners (NE, IA, KS and MO) don't have accents. However, sometimes, I can hear my own drawl when speaking to my in-laws in OH or my wife's cousins in Queens.
 

Maister

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I have no accent (midwesterners set the standard in American English, you know - just ask your local news anchor), but I can do just about any accent well enough to pass myself off as a local (my favorite by far is Engrish, though 'you are having thought of good time')
 

pandersen

Cyburbian
Messages
244
Points
9
Gedunker said:
Growing up in the Garden State, I was fortunate to miss most of the truly horrific Jersey accent (having a mother from Denmark probably had a lot to do with it).

I still find myself sometimes saying "cawfee" or "tawk" or "wooder" instead of coffee, talk and water.

As I've gotten older, I've found myself something of an accent "leech", mimicing accents as I am around them. When I spent two weeks in Denmark recently, it took several days to erase the accent after coming home.

Now in southern Indiana, I occasionally hear myself saying the "Vee--Hickle" needs an "awl" change before we drive "acrosst" "Illi-noise".

My children definitely have southern Hoosier accents.


Hailing from Ontario, Canada, I can't say I have much of an accent. My mum's side of the family are of Welsh and British origin and until a couple of years ago, my dad was a proud citizen of Danmark (until 9-11 forced him to consider canadian citizenship to ease travel through U.S. of A).

Interestingly, when I worked in Michigan, when I was speaking with folks on the phone, a few often interuped the tread of the conversation and remark "say, you're Canadain aren't you". Apparently there are certain words that us poor cannucks speak that give us away to Americans - in particular the word "about". Frankly, I can't hear the diffrence between the American pronunciation and the Canadian equivalent. I don't say "aboooot", I say "about"!!!
 

Man With a Plan

Cyburbian
Messages
219
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9
Greenescapist said:
Someone the other day said to me that I "didn't talk like I was from here." She asked where I was from and I told her New England. "You don't talk like that either," was her reply.

I said that the TV and movie version of New England accents is way overblown, unless you're in a hard core blue collar suburb of Massachusetts, anywhere in Rhode Island or maybe in a Maine fishing village. Generally, I guess I just sound like I'm from the Northeast, although a polite version of the stereotype, with all my R's pronounced normally.

New England has many different accents. The TV version is always way off. The accent that TV tries to imitate is from places like Southie, Charlestown, Dorchester, Quincy, Somerville, etc...- basically inside 128. Once you head west past Worcester , the accent appears to sound midwestern. If you go southwest to Rhode Island , the accent almost sounds like NYC. In summation:

Boston- wawtah
Western MA - wAteR
N. Providence RI- ohwuadah
 

Planderella

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5,344
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31
otterpop said:
Having spent my formative years in New Orleans, I do have a mild Uptown new orleans accent. Not a full-blown Yat (as in the denizens of the Irish Channel who welcome each other with a "Where y'at, dawlin'." To which the other might say, "Fine, fer sure. How's yor mama 'nd 'em") I do say "New Orlens" rather that "N'Awlins" or "New Orleens."

When people find out I am from the Deep South, they often say "But you don't have an accent."

My New Orleans accent only comes out when I'm around others with a strong one. However, I still have trouble pronouncing words that begin with "th." I try to catch myself during presentations and other professional activities but sometimes those words still come out as: "dem," "dat," "dese" and "dose."

Hearing someone say "New OrlEENS" is like hearing nails on a chalkboard. 8-!
 

Maister

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Planderella said:
Hearing someone say "New OrlEENS" is like hearing nails on a chalkboard. 8-!
How does a native pronounce it? I've heard "Nawlins" is that true?
 

oulevin

Cyburbian
Messages
178
Points
7
Having been born in Cleveland and grown up in Oklahoma, people can't really tell. Someone thought I had a DC accent. I characterize it as Midwestern slowed with a slight twang. I'm apt pronounce long i's (as in "I will") as ah. Still, Southerners instantly hear me as not one of their own, and when I worked for a call center, no one would place me as an Oklahoman.
 

Planderella

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5,344
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31
Maister said:
How does a native pronounce it? I've heard "Nawlins" is that true?

Pretty much and like otterpop said, "New Orlenz." That's how I and most of the people I know pronounce it.

Now there are people (mostly of Creole heritage) who use the somewhat French pronounciation: New Or-LEE-UNS.

The only time you will hear a native say "New OrLEENS" is in a song. Also, natives call the parish (or county) in which the city is located OrLEENS Parish.

To break it down:

City: New Orlenz, never New OrLEENS
Parish: OrLEENS, never Orlenz

Confusing, huh? ;) :-D
 

nighthawk1959

Cyburbian
Messages
334
Points
11
Accent? Who me?

After 45 years in souther NC too close to Charlotte, my accent is decidely southern except for the fact that I do attempt to use correct english, with occasionally very funny results. However, when I get tired or drunk, the guys I went to school with from the tidewater areas of VA, NC,SC, and GA get their revenge. house becomes hoose, out becomes oot, etc. I just get slower and quieter until it becomes the funniest thing most have ever seen. Of course I deny all of this.
 

donk

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Messages
6,961
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31
I have a smallmaritime accent, will disappear in tim ethough, mostly it comes out in phrases that I use to describe things:

dooryard - you have a front yard, a rear yard a side yard and a door door yard
up/down river - directions
minihome - "nice" trailer
skidder
subdivison - for everything realted to lot creation
parcel to be added - land to be added to another property
parcel - portion of a lot
popple - generic for tree that you don't know the name of - usually associated with poplar or willow
 

Seabishop

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3,832
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25
Man With a Plan said:
New England has many different accents. The TV version is always way off. The accent that TV tries to imitate is from places like Southie, Charlestown, Dorchester, Quincy, Somerville, etc...- basically inside 128. Once you head west past Worcester , the accent appears to sound midwestern. If you go southwest to Rhode Island , the accent almost sounds like NYC. In summation:

Boston- wawtah
Western MA - wAteR
N. Providence RI- ohwuadah

ohwuadah?


I think the biggest difference between Mass and RI is as follows:

Mass: "Sully was smokin' pawt in the cah"

RI: "Vinny was smokin' pot in the cah"


The example's exaggerated but its that sound that makes me think you say your own name funny.
 

jresta

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1,474
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23
I grew up in NJ far enough from NYC to not carry that around but still not in South Jersey so i don't say "'yuz want some wooder?" or "i'm tired i'm gaown haowm".

Growing up we used to make fun of my grandparents for their accents. My grandfather from Joisey Ciddy was famous for saying "hoooww aaawwww yuh!
and my grandmother from the irish ghettos of the Bronx " . . . so oi says to huh, i'm nevuh takin' yuh fathuhs draws to that cleanuhs agen." All of my grandparents do this weird Cockney thing with a double t as in Bottle or throttle where they break the word into two syllables but they don't really pronounce the tt. They best way i can put is BOHt-LL. Which reminds me that a "Th" before an "r" always comes out "tr" as in "once, twice, trice" or "take the Trog's Neck Bridge".

When i lived in South Carolina everyone would always say "eeewwww don' tok laahk yeeewur from joisey." I'd usually reply "that's a New York accent - we just can't keep them from coming over the bridge." (if you ever want to get an eye roll or a patronizing smile from someone from NJ say "joisey" in front of them.)
When i moved to the Philly area i noticed my accent more so than i did when i lived down south. I guess in part because i expected the people in South Jersey to sound more like me than they did. It's slight but people here point out my "we tawked for an hour" or "they have the best chawklet".

People from the midwest and west coast (and you guys do have accents that are really easy to pick out on the east coast) have a lot of fun with the way i say cherry, hairy, Harry or marry, Mary, merry. They tend to pronounce marry, Mary, merry all like Mary but pretty nasaly. I, and most people from NJ pronounce Mary like a midwesterner would but the "a" in marry isn't a long vowel becase the "r" is followed by another "r" not a vowel. I would try to spell it phonetically but it just doesn't work because it's not a sound you make. As for "merry" well, it's a friggin "e" like in the word "bet" it's not supposed to rhyme with fairy. Anyway, Next time you watch the Sopranos listen for "Harry" or "marry".

I also call the citrus fruit "ahrunge" and the state they come from "flahriduh" and for some strange reason when i'm in a hurry i have a tendency to drop they r in "yestuh'day." I'm also starting to pick up on the Delaware Valley/Chesapeake strange "o" pronunciation that i find incredibly annoying. Haowm is the place you hang your hat, phaown is what you talk on, baown is what you give a dog, and aown as in yuh'rawn yuh'raown.

ohh - in the Army i had a co-worker from NeWARlinz, Metarie to be exact. I thought he was from New Jersey. Other people also remarked that we had really similar accents.
 

Maister

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jresta said:
I also call the citrus fruit "ahrunge" and the state they come from "flahriduh" and for some strange reason when i'm in a hurry i have a tendency to drop they r in "yestuh'day." I'm also starting to pick up on the Delaware Valley/Chesapeake strange "o" pronunciation that i find incredibly annoying. Haowm is the place you hang your hat, phaown is what you talk on, baown is what you give a dog, and aown as in yuh'rawn yuh'raown.
.
'ahrunge' and 'Flahriduh' are definately east coast pronunciations. I knew a guy from Baltimore who referred to lions and tigers as 'larns and taggers' I think that's pretty interesting too (maybe it was just him but I got the impression those were normal pronunciations in that neck of the woods).
 

Man With a Plan

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219
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I hear ya. I guess to the outside world we do say "pawt". But to me it sounds like we say "pot" and yooze peoples says "paht".


Seabishop said:
ohwuadah?


I think the biggest difference between Mass and RI is as follows:

Mass: "Sully was smokin' pawt in the cah"

RI: "Vinny was smokin' pot in the cah"


The example's exaggerated but its that sound that makes me think you say your own name funny.
 

Gedunker

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jresta said:
<snip> All of my grandparents do this weird Cockney thing with a double t as in Bottle or throttle where they break the word into two syllables but they don't really pronounce the tt. They best way i can put is BOHt-LL. Which reminds me that a "Th" before an "r" always comes out "tr" as in "once, twice, trice" or "take the Trog's Neck Bridge".

My Jersey born and bred dad always pronounced battery as "Batt-Ree".

<snip> I guess in part because i expected the people in South Jersey to sound more like me than they did. It's slight but people here point out my "we tawked for an hour" or "they have the best chawklet".

Directly from my Somerset County accent. Also "cawfee" and "wooder" :D

<snip>I also call the citrus fruit "ahrunge" and the state they come from "flahriduh".

My mother, who learned the King's English in school in Denmark always pronounced it "Floy-duh". She retired to NewAmpshah. ;)
 

jresta

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1,474
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Maister said:
'ahrunge' and 'Flahriduh' are definately east coast pronunciations. I knew a guy from Baltimore who referred to lions and tigers as 'larns and taggers' I think that's pretty interesting too (maybe it was just him but I got the impression those were normal pronunciations in that neck of the woods).

In Baltimore the word for the machine you cut your grass with and a lover who is not your spouse are spelled differently but pronounced the same, "paramour". People that speak the hardcore Bawlmerese do sound like that - but when i hear it i hear the southern influence. The pronunciation that a drawl brings, just sped up for city life. In SC it was "laahn and taahgher."
 

Whose Yur Planner

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Whose Yur Planner said:
Indiana accents depend on were you are at and from. I'm from the northern part of the state w/ my family coming from Indiana side of Chicago. My accent is a mix of Chicago and nothern Indiana/southern Michigan/northwest Ohio. When I go back home, I'll slide back into the Chicago accent in a heartbeat. It also comes out when I'm tired or excited.

My accent is slightly different than Central Indiana and very different from southern Indiana, which is a Kentucky accent. My accent also has German undercurrents because of my family and northern Indiana was/is strongly German.

My accent is also re-aquired. I was on speech and debate teams in high school and they effectively scrubbed it. The reason is that the judges took point away for accents. It took several years after that for me to get it back.
 

clare2582

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Messages
193
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7
I absolutely HEART my western New York accent. It freaks people out, alot. I often wish my accent could be as spectacular as most of the folks in Buffalo.

Besides the accent, theres the lingo. Pop. Suckers. Sneakers. Putting "the" in front of any route or highway: "the 90" "the 290" "the 33". I never knew people just refer to them as numbers until I went away to school in central New York. Don't forget the Polish/Italian words (based on your heritage) that people use.... for example, I also never knew until I went away to school, that underwear was not normally called "gotchies" or "gotchka" (sorry for the bastardized polish there...).

I friggin love western New York! Nasal accents of the world unite!!!
 

jread

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736
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20
Here in Texas, we do not have an accent. It's the rest of the world that talks funny :-D

Honestly, though, the cool thing about a Texas accent is that we can imitate ANY other accent, from New York to California. However, NOBODY can do ours. Every time I hear some actor trying to do a Texas accent in a movie it makes me cringe. We do NOT sound like Southerners. We do NOT sound like John Wayne either. The absolute best example I can give of a Texas accent (and this is just the Central area since they vary quite a bit by region) is Matthew Mcconaughey. Then again, Ethan Hawke was born and raised right here in Austin and his is different.
 

Missy

Member
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39
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2
In the UK we are used to being told that this is one one of the few places that accent matters. Because you can tell so much about someone's class from how they speak. My Fair Lady (Pygmalian) couldn't have been set anywhere else. :D

Accent, it seems does matter though even in the States. I've read a couple of articles about George W Bush's changeable Southern accent. It appears that the further from Texas he gets the milder his accent becomes. I was also talking to an American friend and she was adamant that his accent is part of a cultivated persona - the Texan image being one which is very gung ho and extremely American.
 

jsk1983

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I go to school with people who are primarily from downstate NY and the topic of accents came up and someone for some reason thought it entertaining the way people from Bflo say "I parked the car in Harvard Yard." I personally have failed to grasp why this is so interesting, perhaps someone could explain.
 

Salmissra

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jread said:
Here in Texas, we do not have an accent. It's the rest of the world that talks funny :-D

Honestly, though, the cool thing about a Texas accent is that we can imitate ANY other accent, from New York to California. However, NOBODY can do ours. Every time I hear some actor trying to do a Texas accent in a movie it makes me cringe. We do NOT sound like Southerners. We do NOT sound like John Wayne either. The absolute best example I can give of a Texas accent (and this is just the Central area since they vary quite a bit by region) is Matthew Mcconaughey. Then again, Ethan Hawke was born and raised right here in Austin and his is different.

Too true. Someone born of native Dallas parents, learning to talk in Dallas and staying in Dallas, sounds very different than someone born of native Houston parents, learning to talk in Houston and staying in Houston.

Those of us who follow the old bumper sticker "I wasn't born in Texas, but I got here as fast as I could" sound different, too. I was raised by parents from Illinois (they were the first to leave in like 4 generations) but learned to talk in Dallas. I sound different than other Dallasites. I did have a Texas twang, but add to that a midwestern influence and living in Hawaii (where my twang made me so embarrassed I worked on losing it), and I don't sound like other Texans.

I've been told by many people that they can't tell where I'm from. I usually respond with "Where I'm from depends on what year of my life we're talking about". Living in other extreme locations (Texas is extreme in a lot of ways, and add Hawaii, Germany and Virginia to the mix) tends to alter one's speech.
 

chrissy

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1
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0
Accents

Hey you guys!
Well I was born and raised in CA and lived there all my life until my husband moved me to NC because of the military. Being here in NC for 4 years suck, the only thing good about the south is the warm beach. Unfortunetly im acquiring a southern accent and my friends are getting mad at me because they want the old Cali girl Chrissy back. By the way, does anyone know where the southern accent comes from...like from what country?
thanks
chrissy
 

Boru

Cyburbian
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235
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9
A quick guide to Dublin Irish.

Roundabout = Roun'je' bowt.
Dublin = Dubbelin.
Hello! = Story!
Can I help you? = Whar' yew lukkin ah?
Jesus = Jaysus.
Baby = Babby.

To make any of these the definative article, just put "de" instead of "the" in front of the word.

Also, its very important to note that the letter "h" has no real use in the southern Irish accent.
That = dat.
There = dere.
Thin = tin
Thighs = ties.

and so on and so forth until my northern Irish girlfriend starts to crease up with laughter whenever I open my "mout".

dat said, I have a very mild Irish accent, dis comes from being constantly picked up on words by my parents, who were terrified I'd get a Dubbelin accent. Apart from de "h" ting, I enunciate perfectly.
 

Budgie

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chrissy said:
Unfortunetly im acquiring a southern accent and my friends are getting mad at me because they want the old Cali girl Chrissy back.

Sister, southern accents are like way sexxxxxy.;-) Keep working on that accent.

A couple weekends ago I visited my family in Mississippi and I found myself working in an accent. Over the last 10 years my mom has spent lots of time with the Mississippi clan and she's developed an accent, while dad hasn't.
 

biscuit

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chrissy said:
Hey you guys!
Well I was born and raised in CA and lived there all my life until my husband moved me to NC because of the military. Being here in NC for 4 years suck, the only thing good about the south is the warm beach. Unfortunetly im acquiring a southern accent and my friends are getting mad at me because they want the old Cali girl Chrissy back. By the way, does anyone know where the southern accent comes from...like from what country?
thanks
chrissy
The quick and over-simplified answer is that you only need to read the post below yours to figure out which country contributed a lot to the accent of the Southern Appalachian's. The more Eastern accents can mostly be traced back to a mixing of English and West African dialects.

And listen to Budgie for he is wise. ;-) A Southern Accent is the bomb... Chicks dig it.
 
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jmello

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jresta said:
People from the midwest and west coast (and you guys do have accents that are really easy to pick out on the east coast) have a lot of fun with the way i say cherry, hairy, Harry or marry, Mary, merry. They tend to pronounce marry, Mary, merry all like Mary but pretty nasaly. I, and most people from NJ pronounce Mary like a midwesterner would but the "a" in marry isn't a long vowel becase the "r" is followed by another "r" not a vowel. I would try to spell it phonetically but it just doesn't work because it's not a sound you make. As for "merry" well, it's a friggin "e" like in the word "bet" it's not supposed to rhyme with fairy. Anyway, Next time you watch the Sopranos listen for "Harry" or "marry".

I had a friend from CT who used to make fun of the way I say "merry," "mary," "marry" and similar words. I guess in some places people pronounce "Carrie" and "Kerry" the same. Not here.
 

tsc

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My mother was from the Oranges in Jersey...and Dad from Long Island... I grew up in Upstate...but my friends always thought I had an accent...and my cousins in Jersey always had an accent. Made me identify with Cher's "Half-breed"....

Living in NYC Metro...the accents are so diverse...it always amazes me....but am getting good at distinguishing... the Bronx, Brooklyn, LI, Jersey, E. Manhattan, Queens and Westchester.
 

Hceux

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Having learned English at a late age but as my first vernacular language, I tend to think that I don't have an accent. What I mean is that I don't think I have drawls, nasals, twangs, etc when I speak. I do lack of loudness in my speech, though. I don't even know how to yell, scream, yelp, etc. :-c

I have always tried to figure out the phonetics of a certain word before pronouncing it. But, then I do know that there are words that more than one way of saying it. Route is one that I can think of. I pronounce it both ways: rwa-out and roo-t. I grew up saying the former and then when I learned about the latter, I began mixing both pronounciations. Yet, people say that I don't speak like a typical Canadian.

If anything at all, I use sometimes slip in vocabulary that are not Canadian. Every once a while, instead of saying a hectare/acre of land, I'd say a plot of land. Apparently, saying "plot of land" is a British thing. I did spend two terms in England during my post-secondary years. So that may be where I get these British terms. However, I must admit, I did modify my speech when I was in England. Instead of saying "can't" with a short a, I would say it with a long a as the British do it. I believe that you must speak appropriately and accordingly to your audience at times.

Ever since I've recently moved to Toronto, I have noticed that I must avoid the temptation of speaking like the way I normally do and must start making a conscious effort to speak a bit slower and in a more enunciated way especially in neighbourhoods that are ethnically and linguistically diverse. Am I alone or do some of you realized that you must do the same? Plus, I'm trying to learn all of these accents too (and reading their lips too!).

Plus, I'm going to have to be more conscious of my own speech even more when I work with people who have a hearing impairment. However, I must work on making my voice louder as it's a bit quieter than normal - but it's definitely louder than Mom's, whose voice is so quiet that it's almost like whispers.

Slightly O/T, I remember travelling in northern England and chatting with a few travellers in a hostel in Liverpool. There was a German female , a male Londoner, and myself. We were talking about accents. The German person didn't have a problem acknowledging that she had an accent. I didn't either because I have been told that I don't speak like a normal Canadian. But this Londoner was adamant in saying that he speaks the most perfect form of English in the world! Why is it that?

And in addition to this off-topic dialogue, whenever I met people in hostels in northern England or Ireland last summer, we'd tell each other what is our home country. And more often than not, I was asked if I was French Canadian. I said no and asked why. They all said that I don't sound like an "English Canadian". Yet, whenever I met French Canadians overseas, they understand that I'm an "English Canadian" (I'm avoiding the term Anglo-Canadian, because I'm not completely Anglo-Saxon). Then, I'd tell them about my conversations about how non-Canadians would think that I'm French Canadian because they didn't think I sound like an "English Canadian." These French Canadians and I have agreed that these non-Canadians didn't really know what a French Canadian accent would sound like because it definitely doesn't sound like my own. So, the morale of the story - you may have a very distinctive accent that no one can pinpoint what it is. You may have your very own accent! Perhaps I do?!

jmello said:
I had a friend from CT who used to make fun of the way I say "merry," "mary," "marry" and similar words. I guess in some places people pronounce "Carrie" and "Kerry" the same. Not here.

:-o

jmello, how on earth does "merry," "Mary," and "marry" sound different? (and "Mari" if it's different these three)

And the same with Carrie and Kerry? I've always thought that names like these are ones that sounds the same, but are spelled differently such as Lindsey, Lindsay, Lyndsey, Lyndsay, etc.
 
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jmello

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Hceux said:
:-o

jmello, how on earth does "merry," "Mary," and "marry" sound different? (and "Mari" if it's different these three)

And the same with Carrie and Kerry? I've always thought that names like these are ones that sounds the same, but are spelled differently such as Lindsey, Lindsay, Lyndsey, Lyndsay, etc.

"Merry" and "Kerry" are pronounced like "berry."
"Mary" is pronounced like "fairy"
"Marry" and "Carrie" are pronouced like "maa-ree" with a longer "a" similar to "at" (no comparible words)

So, you pronounce "carry" and "Keri" the same? How about "berry" and "Barry?" "Ferry" and "fairy?"

I would really have to hear it to believe it.
 

mendelman

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jmello said:
So, you pronounce "carry" and "Keri" the same? How about "berry" and "Barry?" "Ferry" and "fairy?"

I would really have to hear it to believe it.
Yes...us in the Great Lakes region pronounce all those words exactly the same.
 

Maister

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jmello said:
"Merry" and "Kerry" are pronounced like "berry."
"Mary" is pronounced like "fairy"
"Marry" and "Carrie" are pronouced like "maa-ree" with a longer "a" similar to "at" (no comparible words)

So, you pronounce "carry" and "Keri" the same? How about "berry" and "Barry?" "Ferry" and "fairy?"

I would really have to hear it to believe it.
Absolutely. I know of no one from the midwest that pronounces any of those words differently. Those are all considered homonyms where I live.
 

zman

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No discernable accent for this planner.

My mom is from Memphis, but lost her accent. My Dad is from South Bend, raised by heavily accented Hungarians, but he has no accent.

My grandparents have a heavy Hungarian accent, but I always understood what they were saying in English even when some folks didn't. BTW they spoke fluent English, Hungarian and German. It was always odd when people would try to tell them "This is the way we talk in America," "You need to learn more English, I cannot understand you" when my grandparents English grammar and usage was usually better, and they had been in the USA longer than some of these people have been alive!
 

chukky

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I have not an accent, but damned annoyingly correct pronunciation. I credit/blame my mother, the number of time I heard: "thats a pict-URE. NOT a pitcher. That's a jug". Hence im the only person i know who bothers to emphasise the "t" sound in sh*t.
 

jmello

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chukky said:
I have not an accent, but damned annoyingly correct pronunciation. I credit/blame my mother, the number of time I heard: "thats a pict-URE. NOT a pitcher. That's a jug". Hence im the only person i know who bothers to emphasise the "t" sound in sh*t.

That reminds me of another New Englandism. Names like Canton, Manton, Taunton, Stoughton, etc. are pronounced with an almost non-existent "t". We use a sort of gutteral stop between sylables. For example: can'unn, man'unn, taun'unn, sto-unn.
 

Seabishop

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jmello said:
That reminds me of another New Englandism. Names like Canton, Manton, Taunton, Stoughton, etc. are pronounced with an almost non-existent "t". We use a sort of gutteral stop between sylables. For example: can'unn, man'unn, taun'unn, sto-unn.

Its funny, I've heard Taunton said without either N really being pronounced almost like Tau-uh or Tau-eh. (That's when someone really needs to whisked away to speech therapy somewhere in Ohio)

The word "Pawtucket" is a way to tell is someone is from around here. Natives say PuhTUcket. Sportscasters say "NomaR was rehabbing in triple-A PAWtucket."
 

pete-rock

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Why do so many Midwesterners feel like they have no accent? Yes we do.

I've often thought the actor Gary Sinise has the classic and traditional Midwestern accent -- flat vowels all over the place. His accent is what's most common around the Great Lakes, from Buffalo to Milwaukee. Just south of there, north of a line from Pittsburgh to Columbus, OH and Indianapolis, there's a Midland accent -- sounds a little southern, but not quite. I think Pat Robertson speaks like that. And south of that line there's Ohio Valley speak, which a softer version of the Appalachian accent (but still not quite southern).

I know I've written this somewhere else but I haven't bothered to look.
 

jordanb

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^-- I've heard the explanation being that a Midwestern dialect (Eastern Wisconsin, I believe, around Green Bay) was chosen by radio networks to be the "proper" accent to use by their nationwide broadcasters, on the grounds that it was considered the "most clear" without sounding too funny to people in other parts of the country (unlike Minnesota/Nordic accents, which are clear but sing-songy).

Consequently it became known as "network standard" English and any dialects that were similar came to be considered "unaccented American English."

I don't know if that's true or not though.

EDIT: According to Google, the Network Standard came much later, with Walter Conkite and the TV networks.
 
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