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Do you have an accent?

pete-rock

Cyburbian
Messages
1,547
Points
24
mendelman said:
Yes...us in the Great Lakes region pronounce all those words exactly the same.

There was a classic "Candid Camera" episode in the '60s when Allen Funt went down south, and asked some people how to pronounce "oil" and "all". Nearly everyone said "awl" for both words.

BTW, merry, Mary, carry, Keri, Kerry, Barry, berry, fairy -- they all have the "air" sound to me.
 

Whose Yur Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
12,006
Points
46
His accent is what's most common around the Great Lakes, from Buffalo to Milwaukee. Just south of there, north of a line from Pittsburgh to Columbus, OH and Indianapolis, there's a Midland accent -- sounds a little southern, but not quite. I think Pat Robertson speaks like that. And south of that line there's Ohio Valley speak, which a softer version of the Appalachian accent (but still not quite southern).


I find this true in my office. One of the building inspectors and I come from north of the first line that you talk about and have a similar accent. The rest of my staff comes from central or southern Indiana and they have a different accent.
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,852
Points
47
pete-rock said:
There was a classic "Candid Camera" episode in the '60s when Allen Funt went down south, and asked some people how to pronounce "oil" and "all". Nearly everyone said "awl" for both words.

Yee gads! I've heard myself saying awl for oil -- and I'm from Jersey now using the local Ohio Valley Speak.

Of course, no one not from New Jersey can correctly pronounce the word *tournament*.;)
 

jmello

Cyburbian
Messages
2,580
Points
22
pete-rock said:
Why do so many Midwesterners feel like they have no accent? Yes we do.

If you think "merry," "Mary" and "marry" are homonyms, you most certainly do! :)
 

City-zen

Cyburbian
Messages
41
Points
2
differences between NW and NE

Seabishop said:
Some accent questions for Cyburbia:

Is there a Pacific NW accent at all? Or is the region so full of transplants that one hasn't emerged.

I think the accent in the Pacific NW is pretty much indistinguishable from California. There haven't been enough of us for long enough to come up with our own. We do, however, have some lingo that definitely differs from other parts of the US (at least the Northeast anyway), and I'm not sure whether or not Californians use these:

pop (instead of soda)
tennis shoes (instead of sneakers)
sprinkles (instead of 'jimmies')
elephant ears (instead of 'fried dough')

Also, we never refer to pizza in any way as a 'pie' (as in, "I would like to order two large pies"). We would always just say "I would like to order two large pizzas."

Having lived in Jersey now for almost a year, some of these things have caused me a bit of confusion. :D
 

pete-rock

Cyburbian
Messages
1,547
Points
24
City-zen said:
I think the accent in the Pacific NW is pretty much indistinguishable from California. There haven't been enough of us for long enough to come up with our own. We do, however, have some lingo that definitely differs from other parts of the US (at least the Northeast anyway), and I'm not sure whether or not Californians use these:

pop (instead of soda)
tennis shoes (instead of sneakers)
sprinkles (instead of 'jimmies')
elephant ears (instead of 'fried dough')

Also, we never refer to pizza in any way as a 'pie' (as in, "I would like to order two large pies"). We would always just say "I would like to order two large pizzas."

Having lived in Jersey now for almost a year, some of these things have caused me a bit of confusion. :D


I thought that the Pacific Northwest and California was initially populated largely by Midwesterners, and some of the terms you use above seem to confirm that. Many of us say those same things.
 

jread

Cyburbian
Messages
736
Points
20
City-zen said:
pop (instead of soda)
tennis shoes (instead of sneakers)
sprinkles (instead of 'jimmies')
elephant ears (instead of 'fried dough')

For us:

coke (instead of soda or pop)
tennis shoes (we say the same thing)
I have never heard of "sprinkles" or "jimmies" in my life
I'm not sure what you mean by "fried dough"
 

nuovorecord

Cyburbian
Messages
444
Points
13
Another NW trait

You can always tell a transplant to the northwest by the way they refer to freeways. Natives will say something along the lines of, "Interstate 5 is backed up from the Fremont Bridge to the Interstate Bridge."

Transplants will say, "The 5 is backed up...blah, blah, blah." I think that's mainly a California habit, given the number of freeways there compared to here.
 

Rem

Cyburbian
Messages
1,521
Points
23
I don't have an accent and neither do my friends, but I did notice on my recent trip to the US that lots of people over there do.

That aside - I don't think we have the range of regional differences in accent you have in the US. The only noticeable speech habit I can think of (not an accent) is people from the far north tend to end most sentences with a rhetorical "eh?".
 

jresta

Cyburbian
Messages
1,474
Points
23
Missy said:
In the UK we are used to being told that this is one one of the few places that accent matters. Because you can tell so much about someone's class from how they speak. My Fair Lady (Pygmalian) couldn't have been set anywhere else. :D

Accent, it seems does matter though even in the States. I've read a couple of articles about George W Bush's changeable Southern accent. It appears that the further from Texas he gets the milder his accent becomes. I was also talking to an American friend and she was adamant that his accent is part of a cultivated persona - the Texan image being one which is very gung ho and extremely American.


Most americans have an accent that indicates their social status (which is often but not necessarily tied to their economic status). I just think americans aren't trained to listen for it but i think we all notice it.

When i was at the bar earlier i was sitting next to these three guys who I could immediately identify as coming from the blue-collar Philly riverwards.

I met a friend of a friend a few days ago and after 20 minutes talking to her i asked "so are you from western PA?" she said "no, northeastern Ohio." She didn't have a strong accent at all but i could still pick it up.

People usually have the rough edges of their accent worn off in college and even more so if they move around the country during and after the college years.

BTW - i always think it's funny when southerners (still living in the south) say "i don't have a southern accent". I mean, my friends from Atlanta and Charlotte say that (they're not transplants) all the time. They don't have a drawl and you can't place what part of the south they're from but you can definitely tell that their speech is vaguely southern. It has more to do with what syllables they stress than how they pronounce vowels. My sister-in-law (from Charleston) says INsurance rather than inSURance and TEE-vee instead of tee-VEE. She also calls a shopping cart a "buggy" and when talking about sewing she'll occasionaly refer to pants as "trousers".
She doesn't have much of an accent but things like that give it a way.

The accents in big southern cities are always a lot less extreme than those you find out in the country anyway. It's sort of the opposite in the northeast. I actually find that dynamic really interesting - how the "country" folk interact with the "city" folk down there especially when the contrast between accents is so sharp.

There's nothing wrong with having an accent i just think it's sort of like when i lived in South Carolina and people would say, "i can't place your accent, where are you from?" i would never try to tell them "you can't place it because i didn't have one." They always knew i was from somewhere north of NC. When they found out i was from NJ (which conjures up images of Dante's Inferno in many of them) they would always say "you don't have a NJ accent at all." I'm just not quite sure they would know what a real NJ accent sounded like (as if there were only one) if they did hear it.
 

jresta

Cyburbian
Messages
1,474
Points
23
from Oxford's Dictionary website

English
US English is of course particularly influential, on account of America's dominance of cinema, television, popular music, trade, and technology, including the Internet. Many terms that enter an Oxford dictionary from the US quickly become established in British English: some examples from the last ten years or so are geek, nerd, school student, and 24/7. Many US equivalents for British terms are familiar: sidewalk for pavement, checkers for draughts, cookie for biscuit, and vest for waistcoat. Other differences are more subtle. Some words have a slightly different form, e.g. dollhouse (US)/doll's house (Brit.), math (US)/maths (Brit.), tidbit (US)/titbit (Brit.), while American constructions that are strange to British ears include I just ate, teach school, and a quarter of ten (rather than a quarter to ten).

I love that - our dominance of tv, movies, music, etc, etc. Could it be that we have 220+ million native english speakers (and a lot of other non-native speakers)? That's more than the UK, Ireland, Canada, Australia, and NZ combined.

The term "pavement" for sidewalk is quite common in Philly and i've actually heard "footpath" a lot more in the UK and Ireland than i've heard "pavement".

I don't say "quarter of ten" and actually only know a few people who do and usually cringe whenever they say "10 of . . . " .

I also find the expression (not unique to americans) "we'll try and help" or "we'll try and find" really silly. Whenever i hear it i always find my inner-monologue rolling - "uhh? what? I really only need you to do one and trying isn't going to cut it" It seems it should be "we'll try TO help" or "we'll try TO find it"

Canadian English
Canadian English is subject to the conflicting influences of British and American English. In vocabulary there is a lot of US influence: Canadians use billboard, gas, truck, and wrench rather than hoarding, lorry, petrol, and spanner; but on the other hand they agree with the British in saying blinds, braces, porridge, and tap rather than shades, suspenders, oatmeal, and faucet.

I normally say blinds although, to me, blinds and shades are not the same thing.
Blinds are adjustable and can be drawn. Vertical blinds. Venetian blinds. Shades, what i have at home, can be drawn but not adjusted.

The thing in your kitchen that water comes out of is the tap. The one in your bathroom is the faucet. Generally anything that you drink from is the tap.
Water, beer, soda - whatever. It all comes from the tap not the faucet.

Braces and suspenders are also different things. A lumberjack and a thoughtful plumber might wear suspenders. They're thick and usually fasten to your pantwaist with metal clasps. Braces are thin and are typically worn with a suit and fasten to your pantwaist with a button.
 

City-zen

Cyburbian
Messages
41
Points
2
jread said:
For us:

coke (instead of soda or pop)
tennis shoes (we say the same thing)
I have never heard of "sprinkles" or "jimmies" in my life
I'm not sure what you mean by "fried dough"

Sprinkles/jimmies are the little things you put on top of ice cream.
Elephant ears/fried dough is sold at carnivals, fairs, zoos--anything that you would take kids to. It is a large slab of dough, fried, and usually topped with cinnamon and sugar. We called them elephant ears because they are large and floppy.
 

jmello

Cyburbian
Messages
2,580
Points
22
City-zen said:
Elephant ears/fried dough is sold at carnivals, fairs, zoos--anything that you would take kids to. It is a large slab of dough, fried, and usually topped with cinnamon and sugar. We called them elephant ears because they are large and floppy.

Or "doughboys," as they're called here. "Funnel cakes" in Philly are similar.
 

mileage2762004

Cyburbian
Messages
150
Points
7
not necessarily an accent, but has anyone ever noticed different words for the same object?

bag - sack
soda - pop

anyone got any others??

born and raised the upstate NY, college in NC, grad school in NEB, military several places - have tried to control any accent I might have picked up. But then again why/
 

jmello

Cyburbian
Messages
2,580
Points
22
mileage2762004 said:
not necessarily an accent, but has anyone ever noticed different words for the same object?
bag - sack
soda - pop
anyone got any others??

Plenty:

grinder = spuckie = hoagie = submarine sandwich
jimmies = sprinkles
T = el = subway
cabinet = frappe
laundry = wash
rotary = traffic circle
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,843
Points
40
jresta said:
It has more to do with what syllables they stress than how they pronounce vowels. My sister-in-law (from Charleston) says INsurance rather than inSURance and TEE-vee instead of tee-VEE.
I think your sister-in-law is dead- on. Plus, they are MO-tels and HO-tels.:)
 

Kovanovich

Cyburbian
Messages
180
Points
7
mileage2762004 said:
not necessarily an accent, but has anyone ever noticed different words for the same object?

bag - sack
soda - pop

anyone got any others??

born and raised the upstate NY, college in NC, grad school in NEB, military several places - have tried to control any accent I might have picked up. But then again why/

I'm fairly sure that the pop-soda (throw in the generic "coke" for Texans) divide has come up before in Cyburbia...The line seems to cut through central Pennsylvania (east of that it's soda, to the west it is pop). Most of Ohio is pop (not sure about Cinci area). In St.Louis it is soda, but in Chicago it is pop, so the line apparently runs through central Illinois. When I lived in N. Carolina, I occasionally would say "pop" and was generally understood (presumably because enough people from Ohio and western PA had moved there). Anyway, others on this forum are probably more up to date on this all-important topic.;)

Also, in response to jresta, I tend to try and avoid the locution "try and," but some grammarians say that this expression is completely acceptable, on the grounds that it implies a much greater likelihood of success, whereas "try to" implies that ultimate success is not likely. This may be a useful distinction among the highly articulate, but I suspect that most who use "try and" do so in ignorance, and not for some sophisticated semantic reason.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,843
Points
40
Kovanovich said:
Also, in response to jresta, I tend to try and avoid the locution "try and," but some grammarians say that this expression is completely acceptable, on the grounds that it implies a much greater likelihood of success, whereas "try to" implies that ultimate success is not likely. This may be a useful distinction among the highly articulate, but I suspect that most who use "try and" do so in ignorance, and not for some sophisticated semantic reason.
All the natives down here say "try and". Educated or not. It's just the way we talk.
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
30,148
Points
74
Those who attended Stanfest 2005 were treated to a UP'er accent demonstration between Mski, Maister and Bear (I'm not a UP'er like those guys but can fake it almost well enough to pass as a local)

Yah, I saw a tirty pointer buck up dere las' week.
 

Bailey

Member
Messages
13
Points
1
I grew up in Brownsville, Texas which was 90% hispanic. I never really picked up an accent there though, having originated in Ohio and visiting it often. When my family moved to North Carolina about seven or eight years ago, I picked up a southern draw to certain words.

I also went from saying "You guys" to "Ya'll" and "Pop" became "Soda".

Andrew
 

oneshot

Member
Messages
1
Points
0
I'm Taiwanese and my English is better than my Chinese. I've been in this American school for over ten years and I'm sure I don't have a Taiwanese accent. But the thing is, I've had teachers from hawaii, new york, cali, texas, indiana, oregon, oklahoma, nova scotia, australia, england and scotland so uh......what the hell is my accent? I tend to speak with a stronger R sound but am working on bringing it down a little. Like "terrrrible". I've asked a few westerners if i got an accent and they all say no. but theres just something in my voice, different from the others. ah yes- and we got two teachers from maine also. one from ecuador, a french canadian, two norwegian friends- etc etc etc.
 

jmello

Cyburbian
Messages
2,580
Points
22
Seabishop said:
I've never been in Philly long enough to get a handle on the accent and how it differs from NYC.

I lived in Philly for a year. The city has two very distinct accents. Most black people born and rasied in Philly sound extremely southern, while the whites have more of an Appalachian/South Jersey accent. They say "worsh" for "wash," (meaning laundry for us northerners), "wooder" for "water," and the long Os are more like long Us (ex. "Dude, I am soo stoohned.").
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
13,317
Points
55
My accent is likely odd - I grew up in Syracuse, NY so I have that upstate/western NY sorta midwestern flat "a" and swallowing my "r"'s things going - but I lived in Boston and its suburbs for 16 years so I have a little of that accent going, and now, I'm really trying hard not to pick up a Maine accent (but my husband has one because it's mixed with his Vermont and Massachusetts one)

when I visit my parents in Syracuse, the accent there comes back full-range - it's painful, I am sure, to others - lol
 

SkeLeton

Cyburbian
Messages
4,837
Points
26
Let's see:
In Spanish: my accent is Chilean, more southern regional than Santiagonite.

In English: Probably close to NY/NJ accent, with it's few variations (since it's been a while since I've been out of the US for quite a while now)
 

TOFB

Cyburbian
Messages
3,000
Points
41
jmello said:
I lived in Philly for a year. The city has two very distinct accents. Most black people born and rasied in Philly sound extremely southern, while the whites have more of an Appalachian/South Jersey accent. They say "worsh" for "wash," (meaning laundry for us northerners), "wooder" for "water," and the long Os are more like long Us (ex. "Dude, I am soo stoohned.").

Some Iowa folks say "worsh". Language is pretty vanilla though. Maybe that's why so many famous 'voices' are from Iowa - -Johnny Carson, Harry Reasoner, John Wayne. If you want to hear what an Iowa accent sounds like - - listen to Tom Arnold. I swear everybody I went to high school with sounds like him.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,843
Points
40
TOFB said:
Some Iowa folks say "worsh".
My mom grew up around Pittsburgh, never set foot in Iowa, and we kid her about saying "worsh the squorsh".

Do Yankees say "What in the Sam Hill?"
 

jmello

Cyburbian
Messages
2,580
Points
22
Zoning Goddess said:
Do Yankees say "What in the Sam Hill?"

Nope. "Hell" is not a swear up north. We don't say "could goo" or whatever that expression is either. We just say "good God."
 

CosmicMojo

Member
Messages
543
Points
16
RichmondJake said:
I can't say it. I will never say it. I don't even know what it means.
"Y'all" is a valid contraction of "you" and "all."
:)

I used to have an accent, but everyone said I lost it when I went away to college.

I thought regional accents were fading away due to TV, but a story on NPR a few days ago said differences are increasing.
 

pmf

Member
Messages
1
Points
0
I was taking the T home from work one day and I heard some tourists whispering to one another "did you here what she said? they really talk like that!!" and then began mimicking the pahk the cah in hahvahd yahd thing. It's really funny how infamous our accent is.

Many bostonians actively try to drop the accent. I'm ok with mine. Its who we are.

I've heard people say "What in Sam Hill" (more as a goof).
 

CosmicMojo

Member
Messages
543
Points
16
When we went to Boston, we asked for directions and the guy told us to turn on "Puberty Street."
I exclaimed "what kind of name is Puberty Street? ha ha,"
and my college roommate said: "He said Peabody Street."
 

jmello

Cyburbian
Messages
2,580
Points
22
pmf said:
I was taking the T home from work one day and I heard some tourists whispering to one another "did you here what she said? they really talk like that!!" and then began mimicking the pahk the cah in hahvahd yahd thing.

Let me guess, that was right before they fell on their fanny-pack covered a##es because they forgot to hold on to the pole.

CosmicMojo said:
When we went to Boston, we asked for directions and the guy told us to turn on "Puberty Street."

It's pronounced more like "Pee-bidee Street."

Edit: see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston_slang
 
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CosmicMojo

Member
Messages
543
Points
16
jmello said:
It's pronounced more like "Pee-bidee Street."
Yeah, you should have seen my expression when I asked a Boston bartender what kind of dark beer he had. I just said "I'll have the last one," 'cause I had no idea what he said.:-D
 

dandy_warhol

Cyburbian
Messages
10,199
Points
52
i've lived in NOLA for almost 2 years now and i often still have no idea what people are saying. i've gotten used to some colloquialisms Bur-GUN-dy rather than BUR-gun-dy, Charters for Chartres, etc. but sometimes i feel like i'm in a different country.

for the most part i don't have much of an accent, i grew up in upstate NY where rumor has it, young broadcasters, just starting out, get sent in order to pick up our lack of accent. but my dad is from Cleveland, my mom is from Boston, i went to school in Virginia and Buffalo, and i've lived in NJ, Long Island, and Minnesota. so i'm sure i have a rather unique accent and colloquial vocab since i've been in all these places.

the other night at soccer some Long Island slipped out and the guys on my team proceeded to pick on me for the "Get Beeeyaak" that came out rather than "git back".
 

Planderella

Cyburbian
Messages
5,344
Points
31
dandy_warhol said:
i've lived in NOLA for almost 2 years now and i often still have no idea what people are saying. i've gotten used to some colloquialisms Bur-GUN-dy rather than BUR-gun-dy, Charters for Chartres, etc. but sometimes i feel like i'm in a different country.

We're not DAT bad. ;-) Have you gotten used to "makin' groceries" yet?
 

dandy_warhol

Cyburbian
Messages
10,199
Points
52
Planderella said:
We're not DAT bad. ;-) Have you gotten used to "makin' groceries" yet?

sho'nuff. :)

and the other day i noticed myself saying, "it might not be open RIGHT YET."
 

crisp444

Member
Messages
43
Points
2
I know this thread is very old, but the topic of accents interests me a lot so I am going to respond. :)

I suppose I have a bit of an accent, which can be called a "South Florida" or "Miami" accent. Many people in South Florida speak English with the fusion of a VERY-slight Spanish accent and a slight NY/NJ one. Because massive migration from the Northeast and Latin America (Spanish speakers) has only occurred in the last 40 years or so, this "accent" is very new and people are just now starting to acknowlege it.

Many people outside of South Florida ask me where I am from after hearing me speak. I have heard four things:
1) Are you from the Northeast?
2) Were you born in Latin America? Your English is perfect but you have a bit of an accent.
3) You sound like you're from Florida.
4) I can't indentify your accent. Do you have one?

I grew up thinking that I spoke standard American English, but when I finally started to travel around the US, I was absolutely shocked at the varieties in accents. Sometimes I really have to make a concentrated effort to understand people (especially older, working class people with especially heavy accents) from Boston, Pittsburgh, New Orleans, etc.

For kicks, I'll add than when I speak Spanish, I have mainly a Cuban accent with a lot of Argentinean influence. After having resisted developing a Castillian Spanish accent for a while, I have now "given in" (as I am currently living in Madrid) and now some of my speech is influenced by that as well.
 

crisp444

Member
Messages
43
Points
2
I would like to add something. I have read articles both affirming and negating that regional speech differences in the United States are stronger than ever. What do you all (haha - notice that I did not say y'all or you guys) think? Do you notice a trend in the fading or strengthening of accents?

Also, I want to hear of any accents that seem to be emerging. The Miami/South Florida accent is the only developing accent that I can name - are there others of which I am not aware?
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,843
Points
40
crisp444 said:
Also, I want to hear of any accents that seem to be emerging. The Miami/South Florida accent is the only developing accent that I can name - are there others of which I am not aware?
I was just down there a couple years ago and they all sounded like Yankees from NY. It was so bad I could barely finish my dinner. What are you referring to?

Oops, didn't read your first post. We don't have that here. Hispanics speak Spanish or accented English but I have not heard it with a NY accent. Try to avoid that at all costs!
 

jmello

Cyburbian
Messages
2,580
Points
22
crisp444 said:
I suppose I have a bit of an accent, which can be called a "South Florida" or "Miami" accent.

I don't think your theory can be applied across southeast Florida. My aunt moved to Broward County from New England about thirty years ago. Since living there, she has developed a rather strong Midwestern twang.

Zoning Goddess said:
I was just down there a couple years ago and they all sounded like Yankees from NY

You guys really seem to think that the "Yankee" label bothers us. I got news for you, it doesn't.
 
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BeansandCod

Cyburbian
Messages
284
Points
10
Both my parents grew up in NJ along the PA border and have lived in Vermont for over thirty years and my dad still can't stop saying 'wooder' for water and 'pool' when he means 'pull'. It makes me crazy. Certain Vermontisms are still in my speech, although I have tried to exorcise them. In high school we would make fun of those certain classmates who had thick 'woodchuck' accents by mimicking the speech patterns. It got to be tiresome to speak with one's lower jaw forced forward all the time. But it certainly made French class go by quickly.

I recently sent my husband (from CA, so no accent - says he) into a fit of laughter when I couldn't remember to say back yard and came out with dooryard instead. He asked me what the h**l a dooryard was! Clearly from past posts this term is not limited to just Vermont.

Now after almost 20 years in Boston I know the effort was fruitless. For the most part my accent is just 100% New England. However, after a couple of belts - and the Red Sox on a losing streak - and I begin to really drop my Rs and draw out my As. (or should I say dra rout my A's?):p
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,843
Points
40
jmello said:
You guys really seem to think that the "Yankee" label bothers us. I got news for you, it doesn't.
I really couldn't care less, it's just what we say here. If we meant it to be an insult, it'd be "damn Yankees". We get a lot more of this:

I didn't know that they could read in Columbus, Georgia.
Must have been the sophisticated intellectual content that scared them off.

with the redneck put-downs, than ya'll will ever get of the Yankee stuff. So there.
 

Richmond Jake

You can't fight in here. This is the War Room!
Messages
18,300
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44
ZG and I just ended a long phone call in which she tried to tutor me in transforming my Left Coast inflection toward the southern dialect. Trust me, I recommend you never get into a conversation with ZG regarding the southern vernacular. Things sound different in the south—not wrong, just different.. I’m still blushing. :-$ :-$ :-$
Holy cow!!!

(I'm struggling to save my California accent, dude.)
 

jmello

Cyburbian
Messages
2,580
Points
22
Zoning Goddess said:
I really couldn't care less, it's just what we say here. If we meant it to be an insult, it'd be "damn Yankees". We get a lot more of this: with the redneck put-downs, than ya'll will ever get of the Yankee stuff. So there.

"Redneck" is a specific socio-economic racial group. "Yankee" is a regional slur.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,843
Points
40
jmello said:
"Redneck" is a specific socio-economic racial group. "Yankee" is a regional slur.
Yankee is a reaction to a modern invasion of the south. And the redneck slurs. Don't get me wrong, it's not everyone from up north. Just the obnoxious, overbearing, accented, insulting, anal, bingo-playing, golf-obsessed, "you f*cking redneck", impatient, plumbers from New York and New Jersey.

So why are you dowm here? Masochistic tendencies?
 
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jmello said:
"Redneck" is a specific socio-economic racial group. "Yankee" is a regional slur.
I have never heard that "Yankee" was some kind of slur. If it's so bad, why are there teams with names like "New York Yankees"?
 
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