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Does Canada have any enemies?

Dan

Dear Leader
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Considering that there has always been a large continent of people internationally who have an extreme dislike towards the United States, I was thinking that maybe this country should follow the example of Canada with regards to foreign policy. I've never heard opf an angry mob burning Canadian flags, threats of bombing the CN Tower, or widescale boycotts of Canadian beer. Canadian backpackers adorn themselves with maple leaf patches whenever trekking internationally, so they aren't confused with us evil Americans.

Still, though, I wonder ... does Canada have any enemies? Is there a country out there somewhere where its citizens and leaders just hate Canada and all things Canadian? If so, why?
 

Rumpy Tunanator

Cyburbian
Messages
4,473
Points
25
You know, I typed in Canadian flag burning and I got nothing, so I just left it as flag burning and I actually found another country's flag burning besides ours.



But of course a lot of people hate us too.

And then I saw this.


So maybe somebody does hate Canada.

They are armed.
 

Tranplanner

maudit anglais
Messages
7,917
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36
Dan said:
I've never heard opf an angry mob burning Canadian flags
Never been to Quebec then, eh?

We tend to be lumped in with America when it comes to Foreign Policy. Al Queda has made threats against us for our involvement in Afganistan, and recently a suicide bomber killed a member of the Canadian Peacekeeping contingent in Kabul. A few Canadians have been taken hostage in Iraq, I know one has been released, not sure about the others.

Brazil and Canada had a nasty trade war over aerospace subsidies a year or so back. And the Portuguese don't like us much right now as we're going after them for illegal fishing off the Grand Banks.

I think Americans tend to be the most polarized with regards to Canada - you either love us for our "free spiritedness" or hate us for the same.

The latest issue between Canada and the U.S.? Frozen Pizza
 

Dan

Dear Leader
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18,705
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69
Very strange.

Go to Google image search, type in the name of a country, and the words "flag" and "burning." You almost always find images of even more American flags burning.

After some hunting around, I found this unlikely image.



Sorry JNL.
 

The One

Cyburbian
Messages
8,289
Points
30
Fishing War?

There for a while I thought Canada and the US were going to war over Fishing rights? Oh and what about that rift in the 60's when Quebec wanted to close the St Lawrence Seaway to US use....? Maybe some of you older members could help with the history on this one...?

Canada, as far as I know doesn't take a stand on much regarding foreign policy. The last real stand and show of support I remember, was most likely Kosovo and First Gulf War. Did Canada offer support to the English during the Falklands War?

Oh, I forgot East Timor....whoops, thats Australia....easy to confuse the two sometimes..... :)
 

jresta

Cyburbian
Messages
1,474
Points
23
every country has "trade wars" but i think you'll find most Canada haters in the US. Aside from buying into US foreign policy Canada just doesn't register on most people's radar screens.

Australia on the other hand . . . got into East Timor about 20 years after the fact and of course, only out of self-interest, to check Indonesian expansion on their northern flank.
 

jmf

Cyburbian
Messages
594
Points
17
We have had disputes with Spain and Portugal over fishing rights. But we seem to allow just about anyone to dump oily bilge water in our fishing areas.....
 

boiker

Cyburbian
Messages
3,889
Points
26
Apparently none of you have seen the fantastic documentary and commentary on American/Canadian relations, "Canadian Bacon." :-D
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
25,802
Points
61
Did you know that the Zamboni started in Southern California, NOT Canada http://www.zamboni.com/story/story.html

"And it is the strangest brew of political satire and farce since Dr. Strangelove.
By parodying U.S. ignorance of Canada, however, Moore's film may fly over the heads of American moviegoers."
http://www.dogeatdogfilms.com/macleans.html

Quote from "Canadian Bacon"
Smiley:
When have you ever heard anyone say, "Honey, lets stay in and order Canadian food"?
http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0109370/maindetails
 

Rem

Cyburbian
Messages
1,523
Points
23
I heard an American political commentator (comedian actually) on TV last night refer to Canadians as Mexicans with pullovers and as the main role of Canada to "insulate us from all that snow and ice up north". Made me laugh (sorry Canadians). I was wondering how I would be able to bring that up on Cyburbia - didn't have to wait too long. :c:

jresta said:
Australia on the other hand . . . got into East Timor about 20 years after the fact and of course, only out of self-interest, to check Indonesian expansion on their northern flank.
Australia has a population of just under 20 million and a military force of less than 300,000. Indonesia has a population of 234,000,000 and millions in uniform. (The CIA has taken defence personnel numbers off their fact book site so I'm not precise with these figures). Indonesia is Australia's 2nd closest neighbour geographically (after Papua New Guinea).

It would have been suicidal and ineffective to take Indonesia on earlier than Australia did. I think the main motivation for the government of the day to be involved, was significant internal agitation to address the Indonesian invasion, US agreement for Australia's involvement and UN backing for free elections. I may be wrong, but I don't see any change in "Indonesian expansion" between the '70s and late 1990's, hence I can't agree that Australia suddenly sprung into action out of self-interest in 1999. Economically Australia would have been far better off leaving Indonesia alone, BTW - I really don't know where the self-interest thing comes from. The US still hasn't "got into East Timor" - maybe not enough oil there?

Even Australia's involvement in Iraq is questionable from a direct self interest point of view. We are a net exporter of energy and our Asian neighbours are predominantly Islamic. All Australia got out of it is the promise of a US Free Trade deal. Something many other countries have achieved without going to war. :)
 
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Quail64

Cyburbian
Messages
55
Points
4
Tranplanner said:
Brazil and Canada had a nasty trade war over aerospace subsidies a year or so back. And the Portuguese don't like us much right now as we're going after them for illegal fishing off the Grand Banks.
Ah, if only we were in a nasty trade war over aerospace subsidies with Iraq.

Tranplanner said:
I think Americans tend to be the most polarized with regards to Canada - you either love us for our "free spiritedness" or hate us for the same.
/Canada lover

Vancouver is one of my favorite cities. Haven't seen much though that isn't out west here.

I heard from a secondhand source (my mom who supposedly heard it from a Canadian expatriate) that Canada is seriously considering switching to American currency sometime in the forseeable future. Is this true?

/end threadjack
 

The One

Cyburbian
Messages
8,289
Points
30
Spooky Indonesia

REM: I think the US has your back on the issue of Indonesia invading :-c OZ... If they were in a hurry, we would probably arrive at about the same time they were getting ready to take Tasmania (Not that you blokes aren't tough, its just sheer numbers).....
 

jresta

Cyburbian
Messages
1,474
Points
23
Rem said:
I may be wrong, but I don't see any change in "Indonesian expansion" between the '70s and late 1990's, hence I can't agree that Australia suddenly sprung into action out of self-interest in 1999. Economically Australia would have been far better off leaving Indonesia alone, BTW - I really don't know where the self-interest thing comes from. The US still hasn't "got into East Timor" - maybe not enough oil there?

Even Australia's involvement in Iraq is questionable from a direct self interest point of view. We are a net exporter of energy and our Asian neighbours are predominantly Islamic. All Australia got out of it is the promise of a US Free Trade deal. Something many other countries have achieved without going to war. :)
Indonesian expansion hasn't slowed at all, they're still colonizing the whole of New Guinea.

When the Indonesians invaded E. Timor and commenced with killing 60,000 people in the first few months (which later grew to 200,000) The Ford administration condoned it . . . and worse. So much for the US ridding the world of "evil dictators." Suharto makes Saddam look like a pathetic amateur and, lest you need reminding, Rumsfeld was a member of the Ford administration.

In the year following the invasion, the Ford administration more than doubled its military assistance to Indonesia (to $146 million). In late 1977, when it looked as if Indonesia might run out of military equipment, the Carter "human rights" administration authorized $112 million in commercial arms sales to Jakarta, up almost 2000% from the previous fiscal year. US military sales peaked during the Reagan administration, exceeding $1 billion from 1982 to 1984. Over 2600 Indonesian military officers have received training in the US since the invasion of East Timor, under the International Military Education and Training Act (IMET).

as for australia - US interests are their interests. When the Indonesian expansion touches the shores of northern Queensland who do you think will be coming to the rescue?

Prime Minister Fraser attempted to undermine support for FRETILIN within Australia. He seized a radio transmitter in Darwin that had been used to communicate with FRETILIN inside East Timor, and later denied Australian entry visas to FRETILIN leaders in exile. In addition, he reportedly gave an informal OK to Indonesia's takeover of East Timor during a visit with Suharto in Jakarta in October 1976.

Australian military assistance to Jakarta nearly doubled between 1975 and 1981. Australia now exchanges military intelligence with Indonesia and supplies both military hardware (like naval patrol boats) and training to ABRI.

US pressure may have had an influence on Australia's stance. It's been reported that high-ranking members of the Ford administration warned Fraser to back down from his criticisms of Indonesia's takeover of East Timor. Given US influence over Australia, it seems likely that Australia would have complied. As a 1974 Australian Defense Department paper noted, "It is desirable...that Australian policy...pay regard to US interests and reactions, as an important ally and principal power in the Western strategic community."
 

otterpop

Cyburbian
Messages
6,655
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28
The most important phrase in any foreign language for an American to learn is: "Don't shoot me! I'm Canadian!"
 

Gedunker

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otterpop said:
The most important phrase in any foreign language for an American to learn is: "Don't shoot me! I'm Canadian!"
They would have shot you, otterpop!

Everybody the world over knows the phrase is "Don't shoot me! I'm Canadian, eh!" :-D
 

Rem

Cyburbian
Messages
1,523
Points
23
jresta said:
Indonesian expansion hasn't slowed at all, they're still colonizing the whole of New Guinea. [/i]
My point is that that there has been no real change in Indonesia's attitude. Australia's assistance in freeing East Timor occurred over a long period, needed UN sanction and finally a nod from the US via Pres. Clinton during the Wellington (APEC I think) conference. Of course there were differences of opinion within Australia about whether we should have been working on Indonesia to quit East Timor or not, but your suggestion that Australia suddenly sprung to action when it became concerned for its borders is not correct.

Australia's relationship with Indonesia remains tenuous - every year or so there is an official incident where an insult is traded or Indonesia turns an Australian plane back from one its airports (usually Denpassar). Unofficial incidents are more common, such as burning the Australian flag in front of the embassy in Djakarta, fire bombing of the embassy, street marches. Of course the grandaddy of them all was the Bali bombing.

jresta you seemed to suggest Australia acted out of self interest to assist East Timor only when its borders were threatened. I say there has been no significant change to that threat and Australia's self interest would have been better served by toeing the US/Indonesia line indefinitely. Instead, over a long period, Australia worked diplomatically to assist in bringing democratic elections to East Timor and militarily to protect that election process from Indonesian militias. You can't believe Australia could have forced Indonesia out of East Timor.
 

jresta

Cyburbian
Messages
1,474
Points
23
Rem said:
jresta you seemed to suggest Australia acted out of self interest to assist East Timor only when its borders were threatened. I say there has been no significant change to that threat and Australia's self interest would have been better served by toeing the US/Indonesia line indefinitely. Instead, over a long period, Australia worked diplomatically to assist in bringing democratic elections to East Timor and militarily to protect that election process from Indonesian militias. You can't believe Australia could have forced Indonesia out of East Timor.
You're right, i don't believe that Australia could've taken on Indonesia. Especially with a de facto oil for guns program going on with the US.

I guess my last reply was a little ambiguous. As hypocritical as it may sound I hold countries like Australia and Canada to higher standards than my own country. Those governments seem a bit more rooted in social justice. Mine seems hopeless. So when other countries toe the line of the US protection racket, esp. countries like Austalia, (especially when their population is vehemently opposed to the policy, and especially when it involves genocide) because they think it's in their long-term best interest, it's disturbing to say the least.

The irony certainly isn't lost on me that later Australian govt's come to find that the US line is not in their best interest after all (isn't this the theme of every Midnight Oil album?).

The US is rightfully finding itself increasingly isolated in the world. Our "allies" in Iraq consist of a handful of 3rd World countries (read:puppet governments) and a few eastern european countries who are being paid for it. Without the support of Japan, the UK, Australia, and the Netherlands (of all countries), this war wouldn't be happening. You can't expect to check countries like Indonesia who operate with a wink and a nod from the US unless you first check the US.

That's all i'm saying - not that Australia is capable of taking on Indonesia (or even that it should if it were) but that Australia, with some partners, is capable of shaping a stable future for your region and the world. Your country is certainly capable of sh*tcanning the Kissinger diplomacy that's responsible for most of the world's mess in the first place.
 

jresta

Cyburbian
Messages
1,474
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23
The One said:
REM: I think the US has your back on the issue of Indonesia invading :-c OZ... If they were in a hurry, we would probably arrive at about the same time they were getting ready to take Tasmania (Not that you blokes aren't tough, its just sheer numbers).....
I don't think an Indonesian force would even make it across the desert before it got the crap bombed out of it by the Aus. & NZ air forces and the US and British Navy and air forces. There are always plenty of Marines floating in the Indian and Pacific Oceans, there's a whole US infantry division in South Korea, and the 82nd ABN could be there within 24 hours with the rest of the XVIII ABN Corps (the 3rd ID, the 10th Mtn Div., and the 101st ABN) showing up a day or two later.

I don't see the Indonesians "invading" Australia, they'd need a really crazy leader. If it ever happens i see an armed conflict arising over Papua New Guinea.
 

Tranplanner

maudit anglais
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jresta said:
I don't think an Indonesian force would even make it across the desert before it got the crap bombed out of it by the Aus. & NZ air forces and the US and British Navy and air forces.
New Zealand no longer has an air force - they disbanded it! I don't think the Indonesian's would ever make it to Australia's shores. There is a heck of a lot involved in an amphibious invasion and I doubt Indonesian has the heavy-lift capability to transport and sustain an invasion force.
 

Duke Of Dystopia

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2,713
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24
jresta said:
......there's a whole US infantry division in South Korea, and the 82nd ABN could be there within 24 hours with the rest of the XVIII ABN Corps (the 3rd ID, the 10th Mtn Div., and the 101st ABN) showing up a day or two later......./QUOTE]


Our own forces listed above are NOWHERE NEAR THAT MOBLE! Its propaganda the US military wants people the world over to believe.

The beggining of Korean War was the last time we tried something like that and it was a dismal failure.

I'm learning a lot about Australia & Indonesia though.
 

jresta

Cyburbian
Messages
1,474
Points
23
Tranplanner said:
New Zealand no longer has an air force - they disbanded it! I don't think the Indonesian's would ever make it to Australia's shores. There is a heck of a lot involved in an amphibious invasion and I doubt Indonesian has the heavy-lift capability to transport and sustain an invasion force.
hahaha - wow. disbanded their air force. Amazing. I see your point on moving armor and large amounts of fuel/supplies necessary to sustain an invasion force.

as for the mobility of US forces . . . i spent 4 years in the XVIII ABN Corps and lived a few blocks from 82nd for most of that time. We were called in the middle of the night several times a year to show up with all of our gear. Maybe it was a urine test, maybe it was a drill, maybe it was the real thing. If it was the first we knew right away. If it was the latter we didn't know until we were given the details of the drop-zone. We always had a maximum of 6 hours to be ready. The 82nd always has a battalion that's on "lock-down" and ready to deploy immediately with the rest of the Brigade ready to go a few hours later.

Every piece of combat essential equipment that the Corps has can fit on a plane and be dropped from said plane if necessary. With the exception of the 3rd ID (mechanized) all of the other divisions in the Corps are light infantry and their training revolves around 2 week field exercises because this is how much time is exected to pass before significant back-up arrives.

Marines doing their 3 months at sea are just as mobile. Granted Australia may be as far from the US as you can get but believe me when i say that if the deployment word is given Ft. Bragg and Ft. Campbell will be ghost towns within 48 hours
 

Maister

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71
Does Canada have enemies? (snorts of derisive laughter ensue). As a native Michigander I live on the front lines.... across the Detroit River lies that land from which the wicked north winds blow. Geographically, the province of Ontario is positioned like a dagger stabbing into the midwestern US heartland....
Sure, Canadians like to pass themselves off as these likeable 'regular folks' who hail from North America's hinterlands. Parading a seemingly endless supply of comedians on American telelvision for one purpose alone....to lure us into a false sense of security! But people south of the border who are in the know see right through the thin veneer of civility they don. Really they covet our warmer climes.

I pleaded with Dubyah back in 2000 when he was looking for a war to start that we should preemptively invade Canada - I told him to think about the benefits: - no having to ship troops and costly supplies to the other side of the world, our troops could be taught to speak Canadian easily (just add 'eh?' to the end of each statement) thereby making our role as an occupation force easier, we could invade on the pretext that we would be interceding to prevent a bloody civil war ready to break out between francophones and English speakers......he didn't listen though. ;-)

The US actually DID invade Canada during its Revolutionary war and again in 1812 and was repulsed both times. Also, y'all should check out this link
www.glasnost.de/hist/usa/1935invasion.html
 

Howard Roark

Cyburbian
Messages
276
Points
10
I attacked Canada four years ago. I established a beach head in a bar in Vancouver where I killed off a bunch of Molsen. Striking terror in the local populace I moved fruther inland where joined with a group of other like minded Americans we atacked several other bars in Whistler. We planned to push east towards Ottawa when our vactions ended and we were forced to retreat back to the midwest. I did recieve a citation from Clinton though for bravery in the face of Canadian beer.

Sorry for the irreverence, and no offense to those who are facing real peril.

HR
 

Dragon

Cyburbian
Messages
750
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21
Maister said:
The US actually DID invade Canada during its Revolutionary war and again in 1812 and was repulsed both times.
But they were British at the time. :p

I don't think Canadians like Conan O'Brien too much. :-c Of course this is now old news, but I just thought about it.
 

Maister

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Howard Roark said:
I did recieve a citation from Clinton though for bravery in the face of Canadian beer.
HR
Bravery for drinking Canadian beer? I think not!!!! In my opinion Canadian beer should be one of the principle reasons the US should invade - good beer is a resource we lack and one they have in abundance. They have it; we want it.
 

otterpop

Cyburbian
Messages
6,655
Points
28
Maister said:
Bravery for drinking Canadian beer? I think not!!!! In my opinion Canadian beer should be one of the principle reasons the US should invade - good beer is a resource we lack and one they have in abundance. They have it; we want it.
I love Canadian beer. However, I disagree that good beer is a resource we (the USA) lacks. It was certainly true in the past. But nowadays, nearly every reasonably-sized town in the USA has a decent to excellent microbrewery. Helena's Blackfoot Brewery is quite good. We had a good small brewery - Keesler - for many years, though now they only make root beer. Missoula's Big Sky Brewery has won many awards - Moose Drool is very popular and very good. When I lived in Ketchikan, I drank their beer and the Sprucetip Ale was very interesting (fresh spruce tips were used to flavor it). For a good-tasting, reasonably priced beer, I like a Henry Weinhard's Ale, which tastes similar to and almost as good as a Molson.

But I reiterate, that I am very fond of Canadian beers.
 
Messages
148
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6
The only people I could find burning Canadian flags were a pack of angry newfies.

Angry Newfies burn flag

I seem to recall a pack of Spaniards burning a Canuck flag during the Great Turbot War. We apologized for the noxious soot it made, and have initiated a Parliamentary Royal Commission Report to study methods for creating Canadian flags that will burn in an environmentally sound and Kyoto-friendly manner.
 

zman

Cyburbian
Messages
9,244
Points
32
I love this thread. I haven't laughed more before 9 am (mountain daylight time) in a long time.
On a serious note, I love Canadians. I have family in Montreal, my favorite band is Rush, my team the HABS, and I love Molson.
One thing I noticed, talking with some Canadians last summer in BC, is that they are content. They don;t seem to want to be a world power and spread their influence around, and as an American living during these days, I envy that.
Also being a young American, lots of young people here make fun of or dislike Canada for reasons unknown or very ignorant ones. I always back the Canadians up on this. Also going to Vancouver, I noticed that a lot of young Canadians do not like Americans while some of the elders I spoke with seem more tolerant. Why is that? (any answer from you Canadians would be great).
I also watched Canadian Bacon a long time ago, and then watched it when I was younger. Moore's underlying plot about the American psyche jumped out at me the second time and I bring the movie up a number of times when talking about the American political climate.
I may be deported for this rant, so if any Canadian would like to offer a "sympathizer" a planning job, that would be most appreciated. I can learn to write the "r" before the "e" when writing center.
Thanks for listening Cyburbia, I bid you Good Day.
 

Plan Man

Cyburbian
Messages
125
Points
6
zmanPLAN said:
They don't seem to want to be a world power and spread their influence around..."
We just gave up after we realized a canoe was no match for a modern battleship..... :)
 

nerudite

Cyburbian
Messages
6,544
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30
Plan Man said:
We just gave up after we realized a canoe was no match for a modern battleship..... :)
Don't forget Alberta's great defense system... Take *that* Montana!

 
Messages
148
Points
6
nerudite said:
Don't forget Alberta's great defense system... Take *that* Montana!

That reminds me.

I did two years of my undergrad at the University of Calgary, living in residence with a whole floor full of small-town, crazed Alberta good-old-boys. We came up with the wildest plots for what would happen when America finally invaded, as we all agreed, with 100% certainty, was bound to happen eventually. The best plan I ever heard was to dress everyone up in cow suits (Top Secret style) and wander out en masse to the invasion routes, with sniper rifles hidden inside the cow snout. We would move entire herds of cattle south to mass along the border, and hide ourselves among the cattle. When the US army appeared, all us good-old-boys, in cow suits, would snipe away at them from the protection of the herds. This seemed like a good idea.

It reminds me of the song Cows with Guns

At Simon Fraser University (Vancouver, BC) we were a little more sensible with our "defend ourselves against the American hordes" approach. One plan was to fill a cargo ship full of good old BC Bud and light it up in the Georgia Straight (seperating Seattle from Vancouver for those who don't know), unleashing a very pleasant form of chemical warfare on any US Navy forces daring to investigate. The witless Americans, high on life and not used to such a potent Canadian brew, would realize the error of their ways and decide to come out to Tofino for a beach party instead. We would supply plenty of good, strong Bowen Island Hemp Cream Ale, and Washington and Oregon would mass defect, join BC, and create the glorious new nation of Cascadia.
 

The One

Cyburbian
Messages
8,289
Points
30
Invasion...Talk...or is it....

Spatial_Monkey said:
That reminds me.

I did two years of my undergrad at the University of Calgary, living in residence with a whole floor full of small-town, crazed Alberta good-old-boys. We came up with the wildest plots for what would happen when America finally invaded, as we all agreed, with 100% certainty, was bound to happen eventually. The best plan I ever heard was to dress everyone up in cow suits (Top Secret style) and wander out en masse to the invasion routes, with sniper rifles hidden inside the cow snout. We would move entire herds of cattle south to mass along the border, and hide ourselves among the cattle. When the US army appeared, all us good-old-boys, in cow suits, would snipe away at them from the protection of the herds. This seemed like a good idea.

It reminds me of the song Cows with Guns

At Simon Fraser University (Vancouver, BC) we were a little more sensible with our "defend ourselves against the American hordes" approach. One plan was to fill a cargo ship full of good old BC Bud and light it up in the Georgia Straight (seperating Seattle from Vancouver for those who don't know), unleashing a very pleasant form of chemical warfare on any US Navy forces daring to investigate. The witless Americans, high on life and not used to such a potent Canadian brew, would realize the error of their ways and decide to come out to Tofino for a beach party instead. We would supply plenty of good, strong Bowen Island Hemp Cream Ale, and Washington and Oregon would mass defect, join BC, and create the glorious new nation of Cascadia.
My brief summer in Calgary ('91) yielded similar discussion of how to stop us....mostly just involved drinking until we passed out and waking up to basically the same country, only with more valuable money and no need to show a passport when going to Florida....ha ha ha..... :p
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,329
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31
This Bear doesn;t want to p-off all you good Canadians (other side of box car is "Canadiens"), but.....

Living just north of the strongest country in the world has probably garnered you some protections that you might not have had if you were geographically somewhere else.

For those protections you have been good world citizens, supporting the USA (and mant times the whole "free world") during tough times, tough wars. Your lands have been open to the USA (notice i didn't say "America") forever.....allowing us to build an Alaskan Highway (for the continent's defense), allowing military training,
etc.

You also provide us a great place to visit.....and wander lost in a maze of underground tunnels of shopping in Toronto.

You guys are cool and we help you stay that way.....with big guns.

CN Bear
 

otterpop

Cyburbian
Messages
6,655
Points
28
Damn those Canucks for their good beer and Canadian bacon! But we got back at them. Pamela Anderson came to us a nice girl and the USA turned her into a plastic, sleazy, hepatitis-infected rock ho'.
 

SkeLeton

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Messages
4,853
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26
[pipedream]Well, everybody loves Chile! :)[/pipedream]

Now, seriously, The US although has foreign suicide bombers and all, at least doesn't have 3 neighbors that have a tendency to ignore treaties and turn to ancient debacles for a populistic comeback for crappy presidents that can barely get a 2 digit percentage of approval. (Sorry Peruvians, Bolivians and Argentineans)

I've never heard Mexico whine about why they're poor because US "stole" California, Arizona, New Mexico and Nevada from them... Or at least they don't whine that loud (sorry Bolivians).
 

The One

Cyburbian
Messages
8,289
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30
Bolivia

SkeLeton said:
[pipedream]Well, everybody loves Chile! :)[/pipedream]

Now, seriously, The US although has foreign suicide bombers and all, at least doesn't have 3 neighbors that have a tendency to ignore treaties and turn to ancient debacles for a populistic comeback for crappy presidents that can barely get a 2 digit percentage of approval. (Sorry Peruvians, Bolivians and Argentineans)

I've never heard Mexico whine about why they're poor because US "stole" California, Arizona, New Mexico and Nevada from them... Or at least they don't whine that loud (sorry Bolivians).
Didn't Chile steal the Bolivian port of Antofagasta in 1879?

Link- http://www.boliviaweb.com/mar/sea/chapter3.htm

I think you better watch your back Chile ;-) ....ha ha ha....they could roll rocks down onto you..... :-C
 

otterpop

Cyburbian
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6,655
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28
SkeLeton said:
[pipedream]. . . I've never heard Mexico whine about why they're poor because US "stole" California, Arizona, New Mexico and Nevada from them...
"We" stole California, Arizona, New Mexico and Nevada fair and square. We took it through war and really good real estate deals. After all, that is the American way!
 

jresta

Cyburbian
Messages
1,474
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23
otterpop said:
"We" stole California, Arizona, New Mexico and Nevada fair and square. We took it through war and really good real estate deals. After all, that is the American way!
let's not forget Texas . . . and the cry for war with canada over BC was pretty fierce as well. Remember "54º40 or fight!"

If that were the case the entire Pacific coast from San Diego to the Bering Sea would be American
 

otterpop

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jresta said:
let's not forget Texas . . .
Though techincally "we" didn't take Texas from Mexico. The Texicans won it, once again, fair and square by dealing out some whoop-*ss to Santa Anna and his boys at San Jacinto. The Texas Republic was a sovereign nation for a decade before we annexed them peacefully into the United States.
 

Johnsonjj

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No don't think so

I live in the US and I wonder the same. I met someone who lived in Canada on a game a while back. He had joined the military there and he said all through high school and even now people think he wasted his time with the military. The only enemy I could think of would-be ISIS but I'm not entirely sure.
 

Whose Yur Planner

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Though techincally "we" didn't take Texas from Mexico. The Texicans won it, once again, fair and square by dealing out some whoop-*ss to Santa Anna and his boys at San Jacinto. The Texas Republic was a sovereign nation for a decade before we annexed them peacefully into the United States.
Texas wanted to be annexed by the United States, only to leave 16 years later.
 

michaelskis

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The Answer is yes.... the US. But Canada fired the first shots by giving us Justin Bieber and Nickelback.
 
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