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dream retirement towns

Floridays

Cyburbian
Messages
769
Points
21
Fortune magazine recently named these 5 cities as "dream retirement towns" in the U.S.:
1. Flagstaff, AZ
2. Grants Pass, OR
3. Austin, TX
4. Sarasota, FL
5. Beaufort, SC

full article here


Is your city/town included? If so, do you agree with these selections? If not, what is it about YOUR city/town that would make it an appealing to retirees?

Obviously South FL has more than its share of retirees and "snowbirds." It seems that a lot of them are heading to the west coast (Tampa, Naples, etc) where it's a quieter lifestyle than Ft. Lauderdale or Miami.
 

plankton

Cyburbian
Messages
751
Points
21
Let me tell you a little about Grants Pass, Oregon......

I think my response is similar in nature to several others that speak to the sometimes ridiculous nature of these "Best Of...." surveys.

Grants Pass is relatively close to Ashland and the redwoods, and has reasonable home prices - I'll give it that.

But......in the summer it is brutally hot. The hot air from the Redding, CA area circulates through that part of the Rogue Valley and it gets downright oppressive there. (I'd be remiss if I didn't plug the wonderful Rogue River at this time.) Lots of depressing fog and low clouds in the winter. The surrounding mountains (big hills really) are hammered with clearcuts and burns - not a very pretty picture.

Did I mention the towns folk? No shortage of wrestling fans here. Raise your awareness, not your truck, I always say.

The traffic in GP is ridiculous for a town that size (20,000+) The couplet through "downtown" is four (fairly certain on this) lanes wide on each side and you're always choking on diesel fumes as you crawl past the Jiffy Lubes and McDonalds.

Admittedly, I am happy to see an Oregon town on the list, but GP.....hmmmm, not sure about that one :-\
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,853
Points
39
Sarasota is (well, was) admittedly a great place, if a little humid in the summer. Unfortunately, it was overrun by retirees decades ago. Now you feel like an alien if you are under 70 and have the audacity to go there.
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
30
If you don't like teh heat or humidity you could always try Elliot Lake

"The average rainfall in a year is 69cm (about 26 inches), while the average snowfall is 249.0cm (100 inches).

The coldest month is January with a historical average temperature of -10.9 C. The warmest month is July, with an average temperature of 18.4 C."

or how about my personal fav

Retirement Miramichi , located on the edge of an industrial park in abandoned military base housing.
 

Lee Nellis

Cyburbian
Messages
1,371
Points
29
So who can afford to retire?

I think Flagstaff would be bidable if I could retire right now, but suspect it will have grown too large and dysfunctional by the time I reach that age.
 

The One

Cyburbian
Messages
8,289
Points
29
Lee Nellis said:
So who can afford to retire?

I think Flagstaff would be bidable if I could retire right now, but suspect it will have grown too large and dysfunctional by the time I reach that age.
Exactly my point......I'll be working till I'm dead.............
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
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11,209
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36
My current 'burg has negative attractiveness as a retirement haven, so we aren't doing any planning for that land use ;-)

My preferred locale would be the mid-coast area of Maine, right on that rocky shoreline. When Mrs. G wants humidity, I'll gladly drop her off in Portland so she can fly south.
 
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Obviously South FL has more than its share of retirees and "snowbirds." It seems that a lot of them are heading to the west coast (Tampa, Naples, etc) where it's a quieter lifestyle than Ft. Lauderdale or Miami.[/QUOTE]



I like Naples, my soon-to-be in-laws live there half of the year.
 

SGB

Cyburbian
Messages
3,388
Points
26
Dream retirement town? Here's my criteria:
  • Northern New York or Northern New England
  • Small college town
  • vibrant small downtown/CDB

Like others, I'll probably retire upon my death - and not likely any sooner. [morbid]Perhaps I should use my criteria for selecting a cemetary?[/morbid]
 

Mud Princess

Cyburbian
Messages
4,896
Points
27
I'm with Gedunker and SGB. If I am ever able to retire, I would prefer Vermont, Maine or northern NY any day over any of those southern/southwestern states. I like small cities and towns with character, a central town square or a downtown. And no attached condos!
 

boiker

Cyburbian
Messages
3,890
Points
26
pipe dream: i'll retire to an unspecified address as I tour the world.

Realistic: I'll retire to some urban town with lots of cultural events.
 

ludes98

Cyburbian
Messages
1,264
Points
22
Lee Nellis said:
So who can afford to retire?

I think Flagstaff would be bidable if I could retire right now, but suspect it will have grown too large and dysfunctional by the time I reach that age.
It is already there IMO. My parents own a vacation home and some propery there. The infrastructure is poor for the population they have now. I don't think they have ROW to expand roadways, and I have heard of no plans for transit.
 

The One

Cyburbian
Messages
8,289
Points
29
Life Span....

ludes98 said:
It is already there IMO. My parents own a vacation home and some propery there. The infrastructure is poor for the population they have now. I don't think they have ROW to expand roadways, and I have heard of no plans for transit.
Yeah, but you can't inherit something from the parents if at least one of them outlives you :-c ....I like the idea of picking a cemetary or place for the ashes as my retirement plan (maybe under my desk :p at the time of death? or my parking space ;-) .......Anyone know who is the oldest living planner (in your departments).....If it is less than 70 years old......I have a great chance of beating the record, or die trying :-# . ha ha ha........
 

H

Cyburbian
Messages
2,850
Points
24
the north omaha star said:
Obviously South FL has more than its share of retirees and "snowbirds." It seems that a lot of them are heading to the west coast (Tampa, Naples, etc) where it's a quieter lifestyle than Ft. Lauderdale or Miami.

I like Naples, my soon-to-be in-laws live there half of the year.
my grandparents bought a place in Naples back in the 60's and wow has it changed since I was a kid (in the 70's). The southern west coast of FLA is death's waiting room as far as I am concerned. I hope to retire in a place like Guatemala or somethinhg and die when I am about 80, passed out piss drunk on top of a mountian while watching a sunset...or the like ;)

to quote the great 'leh-'nerd 'skin-'nerd, "you wont find me in no old folks' home"

peace, love and grape jelly...
 

teshadoh

Suspended Bad Email Address
Messages
437
Points
13
Beaufort's a great town - but is anyone surprised that a fairly large city is included, Austin, TX? I wonder how much of the criteria was based on suburban Austin...
 

DecaturHawk

Cyburbian
Messages
880
Points
22
teshadoh said:
Beaufort's a great town - but is anyone surprised that a fairly large city is included, Austin, TX? I wonder how much of the criteria was based on suburban Austin...
Yeah, I suspect Sun City in Georgetown may have had something to do with it. On that level, I wonder why they left out Huntley, IL?
 
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