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Land use Dumpsters during renovations

ryan.smith21

Member
Messages
5
Points
0
Hello,

Has anyone had to deal with commercial dumpsters being used long-term in residential areas? We have traditionally allowed commercial dumpsters in residential areas only when they have an active building permit as long as they’re stored on a paved surface. However, we are having an issue with renovations that are going on for years, dumpsters becoming a long-term neighborhood feature (eyesore), and neighbors complaining.

Has anyone come up with a creative way of dealing with this issue in a way that serves the people doing renovations while satisfying concerned neighbors?

Thanks in advance.
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
12,215
Points
50
How long is a building permit good for? Typically a building permit has to be commenced upon in x months (often it's 6) and then completed in x time (usually a year or two) - so if the dumpster is there beyond the life of the permit, then the inspector should be able to tell them to get it out of there
 

ryan.smith21

Member
Messages
5
Points
0
Yes, they are good for a year. But they are renewable. We're having problems with people who renew year after year and the dumpsters just stay.
 

ryan.smith21

Member
Messages
5
Points
0
Yeah, that's a good idea but I don't think that would fly locally - impinging on people's rights. Really I'm posting here because I can't come up with anything other than time place and manner.
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
14,649
Points
51
My last city had a couple things:
1. We would allow them through a temporary use permit for 30 days. That was mostly for remodel jobs that didn't need a permit. Redoing drywall or flooring.
2. We allowed the with an active permit like you do, but to be considered active a permit needed an inspection every couple months. I think it was 3 months and the permit was dead.
 

MD Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
2,327
Points
34
Increase fees substantially after a certain period of time. The object is to get the project completed. So if the dumpster is still on site after say a year or two (depending upon size of job) then the fee goes up exponentially.
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
12,846
Points
51
There was a similar issue in the city next door. If I remembered correctly, the owner of the house was remodeling it while not living there. He would come in one day a month and "work" (well more like piddle around). This went on for 2 or 3 years and the neighbors weren't happy - it came out later he was doing this intentionally because he was pissed at the guy next door.

Long story short, the city got him through code enforcement with broken windows, hanging gutters, debris and open dumpster, which collected water and became a breeding ground for insects and a harborage for vermin. Nuisance code requires things be taken care of within 90 days.

He got the message evidently through threat of $$$fines$$$ and he finished the reno and sold the house.

Don't know if that will work in your scenario, but it's an option to be explored.
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
2,723
Points
37
We've got two homes with dumpsters on my street. I know they sit there for longer than they should but at least someone is doing something about houses that got run down. One of the houses I might have mentioned before- it was a drug house that was bought by a neighbor. He evicted the addicts, has secured the house and is working on fixing it up. He has a full time job and he's doing this on the side just to improve the neighborhood so I'm not going to get too upset about it.
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
2,723
Points
37
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