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Community development Economic and community development strategies in a high-socioeconomic, suburban setting.

Doberman

Cyburbian
Messages
209
Points
9
It seems like the majority of economic and community development programs are; rightfully so, geared toward largely urban and economically distressed communities.

What does this look like for medium-sized, suburban areas with higher income and education levels that are perhaps looking to compete or remain competitive with the larger cities nearby?
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
13,902
Points
57
It seems like the majority of economic and community development programs are; rightfully so, geared toward largely urban and economically distressed communities.

What does this look like for medium-sized, suburban areas with higher income and education levels that are perhaps looking to compete or remain competitive with the larger cities nearby?
Allow for 'some' diversity of development form (like town centers, etc) and hype, hype the quality of the local school district(s).
 

Doberman

Cyburbian
Messages
209
Points
9
Allow for 'some' diversity of development form (like town centers, etc) and hype, hype the quality of the local school district(s).

Thanks.

What would you say in terms of workforce development strategies? The city I'm alluding to has some of the best schools in the state. How do you create a pipeline so to speak where they are growing up and coming back later? I think this is a question of creating a marketable and attractive city like you said with vibrant down towns etc., but in turn making sure they want to and can afford to move back after college.

This is more prevalent in urban areas, but a lot of resources city uses for workforce development programs end up causing brain drain IMO. They invest in these high schoolers and college age kids and then they leave the city altogether.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
13,902
Points
57
Thanks.

What would you say in terms of workforce development strategies? The city I'm alluding to has some of the best schools in the state. How do you create a pipeline so to speak where they are growing up and coming back later? I think this is a question of creating a marketable and attractive city like you said with vibrant down towns etc., but in turn making sure they want to and can afford to move back after college.

This is more prevalent in urban areas, but a lot of resources city uses for workforce development programs end up causing brain drain IMO. They invest in these high schoolers and college age kids and then they leave the city altogether.
The community would need to 'get over' itself and allow a wide range of housing forms/scale/size to allow bounce back natives.

I think Dublin, OH's (this and especially this) strategies (metro Columbus, OH) are great examples that you need to dig into, maybe emulate, if you didn't already know about what they're doing.

They are working to break out of their binary development past - massive job center and large lot suburban housing tracts. They appear to be successful so far, because they didn't wait till they were on the down slide, which can happen.
 
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Faust_Motel

Cyburbian
Messages
649
Points
27
The community would need to 'get over' itself and allow a wide range of housing forms/scale/size to allow bounce back natives.
Welcome to my entire world. Except my community is large-lot suburban, exports high wage workers to the city next door, and reaps local option sales tax dollars from a regional; shopping center on the backs of the low wage workers it imports but is reluctant to refuses to house.

The name of the game as best I can tell is diversify, diversify, diversify. We are starting to get a better mix of sizes and types of housing and slightly better than national box-store retail. If we have anything to do with that, it's been through a system of performance standards, alignment of water/sewer with areas planned for growth, and incentives that make it economically unfeasible to build total junk. Actual affordable housing? Not yet, but it isn't much less affordable here than anywhere else around. Our competition there is drive-until-you-can-buy rural burbs (rurbs?) that are still pretty easy to live in and commute from- and boy oh boy to we make it cheap to drive in and free and easy to park! Not much incentive to pay extra to live here when it's free and easy to drive in from where you can pee off the back porch.

And we get the whole range of NIMBY fears about housing types. People in $450,000 houses freak out about having neighbors with $375,000 town-homes. Seriously. Luckily the citizen planners and governing body have a little more expansive view of the world- some even have young-adult kids and have talked to them about what they are looking for in a house and a neighborhood if they want to stay- and what would be affordable. They want to live near a place where they can go to brunch on the weekends and mountain biking after work. We can have that, if we set the stage right.
 
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