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Architecture EIFS

MD Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
2,563
Points
39
I know there are previous threads on this but they are many years old. I am not a fan of this material and would like to prohibit EIFS in a corridor overlay zone we are working on. One of our commissioners worked with the stuff and wants some arguments why we shouldn't permit it. I've talked about some of the reasons I don't think it's something we want to promote but what do others here say? I'd appreciate your thoughts. Thank you.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
14,020
Points
58
20+ years ago, the installation best practices and system designs were lacking which resulted in many of the 'issues' we learned about or directly experienced in practice.

As with many things in architectural design regulation, design/composition are key, not necessarily the material in and of itself.

It really depends on your community's intestinal fortitude for ongoing enforcement, but I suggest, at a minimum, detailing requirements to break large expanses of such, especially on facades primarily visible from the public realm.

Or stick to your guns, but make sure the politicians, the appointed regulatory bodies and/or administrative staff are strict during their parts of the enforcement process.
 

Hink

OH....IO
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
15,930
Points
52
We permit it, but require that it be stamped. The technology has move forward tremendously over the last 5 or so year and they can make this product look reasonable. The quality and ability of it to last under any weather conditions are still suspect, but you can stamp it to look like brick on the second and third stories of buildings and you wouldn't know it wasn't brick.

We allow it as a secondary material, and do not permit it on a first floor, as if you kick that stuff it falls apart easily. It is a good material that has a high R value, but generally a terrible look. On hotels or other multi-story buildings it can be used in conjunction with solid brick or stone to create a better look. As the only material on a building though it looks cheap and falls apart... making the building cheap...
 
Messages
2,549
Points
21
Thanks guys. I like the idea of allowing it as a secondary material. That might be a reasonable compromise if it looks like things are heading south.
MD Planner
This is one of those times where you never planned on being an expert on a particular subject, yet it's in your best interest to become one.
An EIFS expert, that is.

Seriously consider moving this discussion to SSFP.

Dryvit as a secondary material is not a "reasonable" compromise in any place with a year-round warm, humid climate and a long tropical storm/hurricane season.

(Some ****s will end up interpreting 'secondary material' as comprising 49% of the structure.)

Also, make sure that a final decision is not made, (or close to being made), while you are on vacation.
 
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