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Election Time

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5,352
Points
31
This past Saturday, a slew of statewide and parishwide elections were held in Louisiana.

When I went to the polling place, there were signs all over the place indicating that a person only has three (3) minutes in the voting machine to cast votes. I had heard about it but I thought that it was some urban myth until that day. There were about 20 candidates for governor, 15 constitutional amendments written in legalese, and several other ballots to vote on. I honestly don't think that anyone can read through all of that and make a decision in 3 minutes or less. Granted, the rationale is that you do your research prior to voting hence saving you and the other voters time. I personally think that this is rather intrusive and borderline unconstitutional.

What do you think about the time limit? Is it good or bad and do other states have them?
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
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5,995
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31
I wholeheartedly agree with you. Truly this must be a case of the government restricting the right of franchise for their convenience. Somebody has to be preparing to sue. I'd join in as a plantif.
 

donk

Cyburbian
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6,970
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30
Would the American's with Disabilities Act kick in for dyslexics or what about people with mobility issues?

Our ballots are real simple and it still takes me longer than 3 minutes to choose, even having given it forethought.

Voting on Saturday seems odd. Here it is usually on a Monday.
 

SGB

Cyburbian
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3,388
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26
That time limit is just so wrong. Be sure to let us know about the lawsuits that should likely result by the dozens.
 

Tranplanner

maudit anglais
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7,903
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35
We had provincial elections last week. No time limit, but seeing as you're only picking one candidate, it shouldn't be that hard to flip your coin or play one-potato, two-potato and get the deed done.

One thing they have done is take the party affiliation off of the ballot. You better now who is running for what party before you step up to the box!

Municipal elections are next month - that's where it gets a bit more complex as you have to vote for a mayor, local councillor, school board trustees, etc. We don't vote for DA's, judges, sheriffs, or dog-catchers though.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
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10,080
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34
I would hope that the time limit is not something that is actually enforced, but is meant to encourage people to read through the ballot and make their decisions before taking up time in the booth. I can see where some very populated areas might run into problems when people descend on the polling place before or after work. If the polls close at seven and you are still waiting in line becasue people are all taking twenty minutes to vote, what happens?
 

Big Easy King

Cyburbian
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1,361
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23
I also had and still have concerns about the 3-minute, time-limit statute imposed during the Lousiana elections this past Saturday, October 4, 2003.

The time-limit issue can easily be seen as unfair and/or unconstitutional, especially to those who don't have a chance to familiarize themselves with the issues until they're in the voting booth, or for those who may not have the educational wherewithal to understand the legalese in order to make a calculated decision upon voting.

My question is, "why and how are 3 minutes determined to be the amount of time adequate and/or sufficient for someone to vote, especially when there are many items on a ballot?
 
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5,352
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Cardinal said:
I would hope that the time limit is not something that is actually enforced
The guy in front of me took his sweet ass time in the booth - well over 5 mins and the polling people didn't seem to care. I probably ran over my time because I read over everything twice to make sure I had the right votes recorded. The ballots are covered with this clear plastic that does not lay over the board very well. You literally have to smooth it down to actually read the ballots. Not as bad as Florida, but still not an ideal voting situation.
 
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3,690
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27
Three Minutes? I honestly can't see how that could be enforceable.

Yesterday at a rest area on the NYS thru-way, a tour bus pulled in right before we did and it took most of the elderly ladies more than three minutes to figure out how to use the motion sensor sinks and paper towel dispensers.
 

ph4red

Member
Messages
3
Points
0
Time limits are there to probably offset peak voting times when many people are waiting. It's hard to enforce, especially w/the septuagenarians that work the booths, but it's necessary to post in order to keep everyone moving. With all the bills, etc posted in the paper and inside/outside the voting area, it would seem that you "should" know what you want to do before walking through the curtains.

What "should" happen and what does happen, however, are two entirely different things.
 

El Feo

Cyburbian
Messages
674
Points
19
3 minute limit?

I know good and well it takes all those dead people in Louisiana more than three minutes to fill out their ballots...

;)
 

Floridays

Cyburbian
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769
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21
No time limits on voting, but South FL isn't exactly a role model when it comes to elections! At least the CA recall election has taken the heat off us for awhile...
 

SkeLeton

Cyburbian
Messages
4,853
Points
26
[bad_joke]That would be impossible for Florida[/bad_joke] :p
Still, 3 minutes is too little time, I'd rather prefer a camapgin to inform people about what's going to be voted and to point out that fast voting times benefit all, rather than imposing some 3 minute rule...Old people need more time anyways...
 
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