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Urban design ⛲ Encouragement of neo-traditional mixed use neighborhoods.

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
21,216
Points
61
The corner market, neighborhood pub, or community coffee shop and restaurant. I am always fascinated when I go to older neighborhoods that were constructed before automobiles became the dominate factor in development. As an example, this fine Irish Pub located in a neighborhood would be completely out of place among current residential development codes, but seems to work so well in this context:


Are there communities being built today that encourage this style of development that has these community resources mixed in among single family homes? I have been trying to find a way to propose this to our City Council as a text amendment to encourage more of a neo-traditional development pattern with the establishment of neighborhoods like this, but I need to do a lot more homework to see if it is even possible in todays regulatory world.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
21,216
Points
61
Wow, the level of response is overwhelming.

I guess I will toss out an additional question. Do you think that this would even be something that people would want in their neighborhood? Would you want a stand alone pub a block over from your house?
 

akepps

Member
Messages
23
Points
2
I guess I will toss out an additional question. Do you think that this would even be something that people would want in their neighborhood? Would you want a stand alone pub a block over from your house?

It doesn't look "stand alone" to me....it's likely apartments up top? So it's a mixed up building on a corner parcel in a neighborhood.
It's a zoning thing....In Buffalo, our Green Code just allowed such properties to be used as commercial again, after being not allowed by zoning for more than 60 years. There's been several nice properties that came back on line in the last few years since the Green Code was passed.
 

bureaucrat#3

Member
Messages
152
Points
10
I would take a look at Nashville's plans. When they instituted their new code, they would often mark corners with a slightly different zone that allowed commercial development. Interior blocks were still required to be residential in most cases.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
21,216
Points
61
It doesn't look "stand alone" to me....it's likely apartments up top? So it's a mixed up building on a corner parcel in a neighborhood.
It's a zoning thing....In Buffalo, our Green Code just allowed such properties to be used as commercial again, after being not allowed by zoning for more than 60 years. There's been several nice properties that came back on line in the last few years since the Green Code was passed.
At one point I think it was apartments up stairs, but now it is a continuation of the business as a cantina.

I agree that it hasn't been permitted in a long time for most places. But would like to change that but need to do homework on how to make that happen.
 

UrbanUnPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
47
Points
2
I guess I will toss out an additional question. Do you think that this would even be something that people would want in their neighborhood? Would you want a stand alone pub a block over from your house?
As a corner building, I think it'd make sense, especially if we're talking an intersection of more collector/connector-type streets, or something that fronts on such a street at least. If this was mid-block/mid-fabric, it'd depend much more on the intensity of the use at that point -- "sleepy neighborhood watering hole" is much less of a nuisance to the neighbors than "regular party joint".

As to that specific building, being more of a restaurant? We used to have just that in a one-story corner building more or less in the neighborhood I grew up in (at the corner of a collector/collector intersection near the rough boundary between two neighborhoods), ate there on several occasions. Decent joint, too -- made it on an episode of D3 even!
 
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RandomPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
1,895
Points
29
In my former Small Town, the corner parcels in a basic grid neighborhood were zoned Neighborhood Commercial which basically allowed for corner stores/ small restaurants/ and the like. Not many folks took advantage of that zoning but I appreciated that it was there.
 
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