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Evil, rotten, mean, and nasty birds

Maister

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Scary Canadian goose update: a flock of (at last count) 31 Canuckistanian geese have established an outpost/listening station across the street from MY HOUSE. So far none has dared set feather in my yard, but I've got an OCD German shepherd who is patrolling vigilantly to see that that never happens.
 
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The last couple of years or so on the street, we spent most of our time camped in a field near a river. Our exact campsite varied. There were probably a half dozen or so places we set up, but we strongly favored a corner of the field near some bluffs.

This was near a de facto nesting ground for some very large birds. I mean, these were the kind of bird that likely inspired Native American stories of Thunder Birds that brought the storms and carried off small kids. These were some scary birds.:-c

It actually was initially just one big bird that my son gave a nickname too, like Big Bully Bird. The bird aggressively protected his territory, probably because it was during a drought initially and he needed to defend his food supply.

Initially, Big Bully Bird kept a close eye on us. He was suspicious. But I guess he eventually decided we didn't eat what he ate and calmed down. Later, as the drought eased up and there were more rabbits and the like in the area, other birds moved in. At one point, there were more than a dozen nesting near our campsite in a copse of trees at the foot of the bluff.

It took me a while to realize they actually could have been dangerous to us as they sometimes eat small deer and other surprisingly large animals.8-! But once Big Bully Bird decided he was okay with us, everything was fine. When he finally let friends of his move in to the area, they never hassled us.

There was also a quite large coyote pack in the area. I'm not afraid of coyotes, which is sort of humorous because I'm phobic about dogs and will freak out about even rather tiny dogs. But this pack was large enough and aggressive enough, I didn't really want to be out and about in the dark and run across them.

But they left that corner of the field mostly alone. We occasionally heard them make a kill, but we heard this a lot more when we moved camp and slept someplace other than the corner of the field. They avoided that area.

We eventually concluded it was because these birds were big enough to eat coyotes. Coyote was actually listed somewhere online as something these birds ate, if they could catch one alone. So the coyotes were probably avoiding the birds near our camp site.

Nice birdie. We friends, right?:D:-x
 

kjel

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Scary Canadian goose update: a flock of (at last count) 31 Canuckistanian geese have established an outpost/listening station across the street from MY HOUSE. So far none has dared set feather in my yard, but I've got an OCD German shepherd who is patrolling vigilantly to see that that never happens.

They waddle and crap and crap and waddle.

Three wild turkeys did scare the bejesus out of me one morning a few years ago. Not sure what they were doing in urban Essex County but they were hanging out by my car in the parking lot and weren't happy about me wanting to get into my car.
 

Brocktoon

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Walked out to my car to go to lunch an a seagull decided that my windshield and hood were fitting toilet for them. Seagulls are the full sized version of pigeons
 
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Australian man undergoes eye surgery after vicious magpie attack​


The 68yo Australian man's recount:
“A juvenile magpie sat down in front of me, I had a one-way conversation for a few seconds and it was just looking at me. . . . I started to open [my] lunchbox, the next thing I knew, the bird had flown at my face and struck me in the left eye.”

“The bird sat on the concrete in front of me, and saw I hadn’t dropped the food, or I think that was what its thinking was. . . . It immediately attacked the right-hand side of my face, on the eye with a fair bit of force, and drew some blood.”

This year, about 60 patients with bird-related injuries have checked into Australia's Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital.

Magpie swooping season may be worse this year due to coronavirus-fueled mask mandates in the area, experts in the [Australian] area have warned. The birds are "spooked by masks" and “tend to swoop the people they see as a threat,” said Sean Dooley of Birdlife Australia.
 
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