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Geography 🌎 Exploring Google Maps

Messages
2,963
Points
23
In what window of years was it a thing to deliberately plan geometrically symetric neighborhoods like these?
Rando subdivision of the day. Liberal, KS
I don't think we have any of those geometrically symmetric neighborhoods in Fort Worth.

Another one. Planner friend lives here. Janesville, WI

Janesville, WI- Former House Speaker Paul Ryan owns (and maybe still live in) a multi-generational mini-mansion there.
I wonder if he or his ancestors had anything to do with making ^that^ part geometrically symmetric?
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
19,174
Points
71
Rando subdivision of the day. Liberal, KS
I looked at that neighborhood not too long ago! The pattern screams “1920s move-up subdivision”, and the housing age tells me it sat postlude empty for 30+ years, thanks to the Great Depression and WWII.

There’s alleys, but few alley load garages. Houses have mostly street load attached garages.

There’s quite a few interesting mid-century “architectury” houses among the mix. I saw a lot of cool mid-century modern houses when looking around Garden City, too.
 

TOFB

Cyburbian
Messages
2,914
Points
38
I looked at that neighborhood not too long ago! The pattern screams “1920s move-up subdivision”, and the housing age tells me it sat postlude empty for 30+ years, thanks to the Great Depression and WWII.

There’s alleys, but few alley load garages. Houses have mostly street load attached garages.

There’s quite a few interesting mid-century “architectury” houses among the mix. I saw a lot of cool mid-century modern houses when looking around Garden City, too.
Did you see this MCM Mission Style just off the park, Dan? MCM Mission Style
 

SlaveToTheGrind

Cyburbian
Messages
1,584
Points
28
In what window of years was it a thing to deliberately plan geometrically symetric neighborhoods like these?





Janesville, WI- Former House Speaker Paul Ryan owns (and maybe still live in) a multi-generational mini-mansion there.
I wonder if he or his ancestors had anything to do with making ^that^ part geometrically symmetric?
I can only imagine the traffic issues at those three perimeter corner intersections.
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
15,489
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53
I'm honestly surprised that they are worth up to $150,000, but that's still relatively cheap in the Phoenix market.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
19,174
Points
71
I took a wrong turn. I did nazi the street sign.

 

bureaucrat#3

Member
Messages
116
Points
8
Suloszowa, Poland. Town is basically one long street 4+ miles long.

https://goo.gl/maps/kT48qhTEApQBt6nr8
That's an interesting pattern. You can tell there are fields directly behind the homes. A lot of the homes appear to be multi-unit, stacked or traditional duplexes with warehouse/barns behind them. Not what I would assume of a rural-ish place.

There is a nice castle to the south-east a bit. Also there was a cemetery that appeared to be all vaults.

I know next to nothing about Poland, so maybe this is standard.
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
26,506
Points
70
What's going on here, JNA? Navy Support Activity Crane

Why the U.S. Navy Manages a Forest​

 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
15,489
Points
53
There used to be a $1 Bud night there at one time.
There used to be a nice oyster bar on the beach where we would get a bucket of oysters and a bucket of rolling rocks for $10 and just hang out and watch the ocean. I can't find it now. Must be gone.
 

jsk1983

Cyburbian
Messages
2,507
Points
25

Taking neighborhood watch to a whole new level?

I'd assume this is leftover from when this area was made into a suburban neighborhood, because I can't imagine something like that being allowed otherwise.
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
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Moderator
Messages
29,624
Points
73

Taking neighborhood watch to a whole new level?

I'd assume this is leftover from when this area was made into a suburban neighborhood, because I can't imagine something like that being allowed otherwise.
Dayum! Where's the 12' chain link fence topped with razor wire? Where are the guard dogs?
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
14,056
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57

Taking neighborhood watch to a whole new level?

I'd assume this is leftover from when this area was made into a suburban neighborhood, because I can't imagine something like that being allowed otherwise.

Well ya see, his son wanted a tree house and being there's no sufficient tree in the backyard, he adjusted the plans and built this. Now that Sonny is in college, daddy has a new 'man cave' since there's no basement. Getting the pool table up there was a pain though.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
15,248
Points
59

Taking neighborhood watch to a whole new level?

I'd assume this is leftover from when this area was made into a suburban neighborhood, because I can't imagine something like that being allowed otherwise.
That's cool. I'd bet it meets the maximum building height for the underlying zoning district. Likely about 35-40 feet.

I live in a similar aged and developed neighborhood and my maximum building height is 35 feet. I was even talking to my boys this past summer about this concept - a cool tower on the top of our ranch house.
 

MD Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
2,950
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47

Taking neighborhood watch to a whole new level?

I'd assume this is leftover from when this area was made into a suburban neighborhood, because I can't imagine something like that being allowed otherwise.

I'm not sure I'd be wild about it being next door. But at the same time it is kinda cool.
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
29,624
Points
73
New Cumnock, Scotland. They knocked down (most of) the houses, but never removed the streets.

I've seen this sort of thing a number of times, yet it never fails to have an eerie 'ghost burbs' effect.
 

wintergirl

Cyburbian
Messages
35
Points
2
At least in Liverpool, evidently.
"Courage" is a reference to White, Tomkins and Courage, a company which had a large landmark grain silo where the Costco now sits.

Staying in Liverpool:

"Club O-Five-One", a long closed nightclub which still has its signage up from the 1990s. Local radio still regularly refers to it in terms of "hey, remember this track from the 051?". Its main use now appears to be as a place to house a mobile phone tower.
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,788
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46
"We were very careful buying our house; we never dreamed that this street would go though. After all, it has a tree in the way!"

Link
That has to be the dumpiest fire hydrant I've ever seen. "Stand up, man! Have some pride!"
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
26,506
Points
70
Fire hydrant not to code.
The lowest outlet cap nut shall be a minimum height of 18-inches above finished grade.
 

TOFB

Cyburbian
Messages
2,914
Points
38
Fire hydrant not to code.
The lowest outlet cap nut shall be a minimum height of 18-inches above finished grade.
Private Water Company. Reported! I'd bet a hundred bucks this thing has not been shoveled out; we have about 18 inches of snow on the ground.
 
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