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Geography 🌎 Exploring Google Maps

Dan

Dear Leader
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19,150
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70
Not just an abandoned interurban right-of-way, but an abandoned interurban right-of-way with track and wire. Sacramento Northern in Rio Vista, California. (EDIT: apparently a railroad museum still uses it for old streetcars.)


Illinois Terminal remnants in St. Louis were still under wire the last time I saw them, but the overhead is gone now.


Also, the shittiest location for a chain hotel ever.


I'd like to know the story behind this house.


Or this house.

 
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wintergirl

Cyburbian
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34
Points
2
Another "street that's not where you'd expect it" - Third Avenue:


It's a pleasant, leafy little street with cute cafés and delis and hairdressers, it could be in the bougie district of any city - zoom out, and you'll see that it's right in the middle of one of Europe's biggest industrial areas, surrounded by miles and miles of factories and warehouses.
 

Bubba

Cyburbian
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5,687
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43
Another "street that's not where you'd expect it" - Third Avenue:


It's a pleasant, leafy little street with cute cafés and delis and hairdressers, it could be in the bougie district of any city - zoom out, and you'll see that it's right in the middle of one of Europe's biggest industrial areas, surrounded by miles and miles of factories and warehouses.
You could walk over to Old Trafford from there...
 

TOFB

Cyburbian
Messages
2,851
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37
What's the story behind this?
I'd like to know too. My first thought is that it is a "company estate" for the nearby quarry, but the quarry does not look that big to support that number of workers. Why wouldn't they live in Staindrop? (Cool town name, BTW)
 

jsk1983

Cyburbian
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2,503
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25
I'd like to know too. My first thought is that it is a "company estate" for the nearby quarry, but the quarry does not look that big to support that number of workers. Why wouldn't they live in Staindrop? (Cool town name, BTW)
When they built those I'd assume no one had cars...
Also I'd sort of expect a pub, a few dozen houses is enough to support at least one pub right?
 

wintergirl

Cyburbian
Messages
34
Points
2
What's the story behind this?
It was built as mineworkers' housing (in a similar style to other miners' housing of the era). The mine was unsuccessful - there were technical problems meaning significant quantities of coal couldn't be raised, and the First World War broke out shortly after the houses were completed, so it ended up as just a row of houses in the middle of nowhere.

Most locals now commute to work in Darlington or Barnard Castle, nearby towns.

 

Dan

Dear Leader
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19,150
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70
South Cleatlam, County Durham. It looks like any terraced street in any northern English town, until you zoom out...
What the ...

That one has "what planning permission?" written all over it. I know UK planning rules have always frowned on frontage development, but I'm scratching my head over this one.

The North American equivalent is the mobile home park in the middle of nowhere. Nothing for miles, and then boom, a hundred singlewides. Where did the people who live there come from? Why do they live there? Where do they work?
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
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What the ...

That one has "what planning permission?" written all over it. I know UK planning rules have always frowned on frontage development, but I'm scratching my head over this one.

The North American equivalent is the mobile home park in the middle of nowhere.
More likely...what's all this then?

If this happened just before WW1, were there even 'planning permission' rules/processes in the manner we think of them today?

@wintergirl
 
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wintergirl

Cyburbian
Messages
34
Points
2
Oh man...I wish small country cities/towns/villages looked like this in the US (at least in urban form).

The setting for All Creatures Great and Small?

:daydream:

EDIT: Nope. Apparently, it was filmed in Grassington
Barnard Castle is a lovely town in its own right, and is the home of the finest museum of art and design in the north, the beautiful Bowes Museum, home to Canalettos and Goyas.

The town gained some notoriety in 2020 as the destination of Dominic Cummings' ill-fated trip during the first Covid-19 lockdown.
 

TOFB

Cyburbian
Messages
2,851
Points
37
When they built those I'd assume no one had cars...
Also I'd sort of expect a pub, a few dozen houses is enough to support at least one pub right?
Rule of thumb in England: one dozen homes/one pub. Ireland it is more like 9/1.
 

TOFB

Cyburbian
Messages
2,851
Points
37
Speaking of Islands, I recently discovered my Grandmother lived here immediately before she emigrated to the US in 1913. My Great-Grandfather was a tax collector working for the Crown at the local distillery. They were 100% Irish, though.

Love genealogy.

Bowmore, Islay, Scotland
 

Bubba

Cyburbian
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5,687
Points
43
Mmmm, whisky....

25-year-old-small.png
 

luckless pedestrian

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13,001
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55
I'd like to know the story behind this house.


Or this house.


They almost look like old company housing - or maybe hold-outs (they ain't takin my propertay! or I'll wait a bit and get some real money for this!)
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
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29,470
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73
I heard the word used regularly when we recently watched the BBC shows 'Victorian Farm' and 'Edwardian Farm'
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,602
Points
54
Speaking of Islands, I recently discovered my Grandmother lived here immediately before she emigrated to the US in 1913. My Great-Grandfather was a tax collector working for the Crown at the local distillery. They were 100% Irish, though.

Love genealogy.

Bowmore, Islay, Scotland
I know what you mean. I learned that my ancestors lived on or near this street in the mid to late 1700's.

 
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