• Cyburbia is a friendly big tent, where we share our experiences and thoughts about urban planning practice, planning adjacent topics, and whatever else comes to mind. No ads, no spam, no echo chambers. Create your FREE Cyburbia ID, and join us today! You can also register through your Reddit, Facebook, Google, Twitter, or Microsoft account.

Exploring Google Maps

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
27,896
Points
70
I think that what's cool about. It's similar to what I liked hiking at Pictured Rocks. There were places where you felt you were at the end of the earth. The next closest piece of ground was in Canada, on the other side of the big lake.
Folks have difficulty sometimes understanding just how great in size the Great Lakes are. Like no, you can't see the other side of the lakes no matter how clear a day it is because of the curvature of the Earth.
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
2,386
Points
33
Like no, you can't see the other side of the lakes no matter how clear a day it is because of the curvature of the Earth.
You can just make out the Toronto skyline from the Buffalo side of Lake Ontario (actually, Youngstown, NY).... about 30 miles across the lake.

While I'm exploring tangents, It's about 60 miles from Buffalo to Toronto as the crow flies, but it's 100 miles by car since you have to drive around the tip of Lake Ontario.
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
27,896
Points
70
learned about the most messed up national border on earth this morning. It's the Belgium/Netherlands border around the town of Baarle-Hertog. It consists of a series of gerrymandered lines around what were obvious individual properties centuries ago and a score or so of Belgian enclaves scattered throughout the otherwise Dutch town (and Dutch enclaves within Belgian parts of town). It is bizarre, and the strangest thing is that I'd never heard of it before.

Here's a sample of how this 'national boundary' looks at streetview level

1581002691393.png
 
  • Like
Reactions: Dan

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
12,299
Points
44
This is Anfield ... and Goodison too.

Liverpool's and Everton's home field are very close in proximity to each other.

1581024203095.png
 

giff57

Corn Burning Fool
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
5,427
Points
33
yep. Agreed
And Carter Lake is in Iowa. If you look at the dotted lines you can see where the town used to be East of the river. FYI Carter Lake used to have the reputation for being quite the "Den of Iniquity" .
 

kjel

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
12,347
Points
39
And Carter Lake is in Iowa. If you look at the dotted lines you can see where the town used to be East of the river. FYI Carter Lake used to have the reputation for being quite the "Den of Iniquity" .
When I was going to the airport in an Uber I was watching the map on the app and saw that we were in Nebraska, then Iowa, then back in Nebraska :ha:
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
25,146
Points
55
AIB this discussion of map splits

There is a Illinois piece west of the Mississippi River
and
there are Missouri pieces east of the Mississippi River


There is a piece of Kentucky north of the Ohio River
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
27,896
Points
70
This represents the most scenic vista in Cisco, UT.
Seriously, that is best view of the town right there. Whatever you do don't look behind you.

 

giff57

Corn Burning Fool
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
5,427
Points
33
AIB this discussion of map splits

There is a Illinois piece west of the Mississippi River
and
there are Missouri pieces east of the Mississippi River


There is a piece of Kentucky north of the Ohio River
The Carter Lake example may be the only one that contains an entire town.
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,245
Points
37
The Statue of Liberty which is in New York, lies entirely within New Jersey.

After the 1977 NYC blackout, a fellow I worked with noted that the lights stayed on at the Statue of Liberty. In his reasoning, "Weedman, they owe us (New Jerseyans) 200 years of electric bills we been payin'".:wow:
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
2,386
Points
33
AIB this discussion of map splits

There is a Illinois piece west of the Mississippi River
and
there are Missouri pieces east of the Mississippi River


There is a piece of Kentucky north of the Ohio River
This is undoubtedly an artifact of the movement of the rivers over time. I'm trying to remember.... I believe the "official" border between Texas and Oklahoma is the Red River, which also moves from time to time, and I think a land owner along the river brought a suit to argue that the border shouldn't move with the river because he had land that had the norther border of Texas as the northern boundary, but the movement of the river had "stolen" some of his land.
 
Top