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Exploring Google Maps

Maister

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I think that what's cool about. It's similar to what I liked hiking at Pictured Rocks. There were places where you felt you were at the end of the earth. The next closest piece of ground was in Canada, on the other side of the big lake.
Folks have difficulty sometimes understanding just how great in size the Great Lakes are. Like no, you can't see the other side of the lakes no matter how clear a day it is because of the curvature of the Earth.
 

Doohickie

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Like no, you can't see the other side of the lakes no matter how clear a day it is because of the curvature of the Earth.
You can just make out the Toronto skyline from the Buffalo side of Lake Ontario (actually, Youngstown, NY).... about 30 miles across the lake.

While I'm exploring tangents, It's about 60 miles from Buffalo to Toronto as the crow flies, but it's 100 miles by car since you have to drive around the tip of Lake Ontario.
 

Maister

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learned about the most messed up national border on earth this morning. It's the Belgium/Netherlands border around the town of Baarle-Hertog. It consists of a series of gerrymandered lines around what were obvious individual properties centuries ago and a score or so of Belgian enclaves scattered throughout the otherwise Dutch town (and Dutch enclaves within Belgian parts of town). It is bizarre, and the strangest thing is that I'd never heard of it before.

Here's a sample of how this 'national boundary' looks at streetview level

1581002691393.png
 
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Planit

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This is Anfield ... and Goodison too.

Liverpool's and Everton's home field are very close in proximity to each other.

1581024203095.png
 

giff57

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yep. Agreed
And Carter Lake is in Iowa. If you look at the dotted lines you can see where the town used to be East of the river. FYI Carter Lake used to have the reputation for being quite the "Den of Iniquity" .
 

kjel

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And Carter Lake is in Iowa. If you look at the dotted lines you can see where the town used to be East of the river. FYI Carter Lake used to have the reputation for being quite the "Den of Iniquity" .
When I was going to the airport in an Uber I was watching the map on the app and saw that we were in Nebraska, then Iowa, then back in Nebraska :ha:
 

JNA

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AIB this discussion of map splits

There is a Illinois piece west of the Mississippi River
and
there are Missouri pieces east of the Mississippi River


There is a piece of Kentucky north of the Ohio River
 

Maister

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This represents the most scenic vista in Cisco, UT.
Seriously, that is best view of the town right there. Whatever you do don't look behind you.

 

giff57

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AIB this discussion of map splits

There is a Illinois piece west of the Mississippi River
and
there are Missouri pieces east of the Mississippi River


There is a piece of Kentucky north of the Ohio River
The Carter Lake example may be the only one that contains an entire town.
 

Gedunker

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The Statue of Liberty which is in New York, lies entirely within New Jersey.

After the 1977 NYC blackout, a fellow I worked with noted that the lights stayed on at the Statue of Liberty. In his reasoning, "Weedman, they owe us (New Jerseyans) 200 years of electric bills we been payin'".:wow:
 

Doohickie

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AIB this discussion of map splits

There is a Illinois piece west of the Mississippi River
and
there are Missouri pieces east of the Mississippi River


There is a piece of Kentucky north of the Ohio River
This is undoubtedly an artifact of the movement of the rivers over time. I'm trying to remember.... I believe the "official" border between Texas and Oklahoma is the Red River, which also moves from time to time, and I think a land owner along the river brought a suit to argue that the border shouldn't move with the river because he had land that had the norther border of Texas as the northern boundary, but the movement of the river had "stolen" some of his land.
 

Planit

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My Grandmothers (former) house. It wasn't blue then.

 

Gedunker

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My Grandmothers (former) house. It wasn't blue then.

What would Grandma think of the new circular driveway? (Cute house and 'hood by the way.)
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
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The country corner store my maternal grandmother seldom got to visit as a child in the early 1920s

My maternal grandparents' retirement house and where I spent many a summer week or weekend as a kid. (Aerial view - they owned about 6 acres and 500 feet of nice shallow sandy frontage on the river) They bought it as a cottage in the mid-1960s when they lived in Detroit. Then built this house in ~1970 and lived/owned there until 1991 when my grandfather died. My parents actually spent their honeymoon at the cottage in 1966. I still harbor dreams of buying it to bring the property back into the family as the current owners are still the couple that bought the house/property from my grandmother in 1991.
 

Planit

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What would Grandma think of the new circular driveway? (Cute house and 'hood by the way.)

It was a duplex turned into a SF house by the present owners so I think the circular works. Grandmother owned it with her sister from 1950. This is the 4th or 5th duplex turned into SF in that neighborhood over the last few years (Mom had full ownership and sold it in 2015).
 

Dan

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This is undoubtedly an artifact of the movement of the rivers over time.
The Rio Grande between El Paso and Juarez used to change course, putting parts of the United States on the southern side, and parts of Mexico on the northern side. The Rio Grande was channelized in 1899, but the border didn't change until 1964. Before then, there was a chunk of Mexico on the US side of the river. The solution -- rechannel the river again, and swap Mexican territory north of the new channel for US territory that was south.
 

JNA

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This place as good seafood

 

Gedunker

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Wonder what the deal is with the dazzle camouflage boat?
 

Planit

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Not the "quite right" Little Mermaid

 

Doohickie

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JNA

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Here is what is happening at Maisterisaari, Padasjoki, Finland

then there is Maisterinkatu, Riihimäki, Finland
 

mendelman

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mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
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mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
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I think they're referring to a different kind of planners. Or maybe urban planners are viewed as sex symbols in Luxembourg (quickly checks immigration requirements).
Also - Lanners is apparently a well-known surname and at least one hotel's name in Luxembourg.
 
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