• Ongoing coronavirus / COVID-19 discussion: how is the pandemic affecting your community, workplace, and wellness? 🦠

    Working from home? So are we. Come join us! Cyburbia is a friendly big tent, where we share our experiences and thoughts about urban planning practice, planning adjacent topics, and whatever else comes to mind. No ads, no spam, no social distancing.

Exploring Google Maps

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
13,689
Points
53
No no. It was an oversight. I'm sure the 'p' fell off.
That's what I automatically assumed, but then I asked the Google machine and I was soon disabused of that assumption.

:confused:
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,379
Points
39
Underground utility location markings?
Not utility locates, pavement markings. Stop bar with no stop sign; parking lane closure line; no cross-walk. Somebody in NC needs the approved NCMUTCD, stat!
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
12,829
Points
51
I kinda like the chest a drawers. Looks like the town was/is a furniture manufacturer.

Very furniture oriented. They host the market furniture show twice a year.

For example, if you're in furniture industry, you'll go to "Market" in April. The cool part is when Market is over, you can by some great samples for dirt cheap and those pieces are better constructed because they're being shown.
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
12,829
Points
51
Hey there's a BBQ joint in our collective favorite town:

 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
28,249
Points
71
This is the quintessential scene from Kenya: a combination animal feed store and 'computer secretarial college'
Humans always do what they gotta do to survive and get by.
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
12,829
Points
51
I have to do some calculating on exchange rates, but $35 seems a lot for a 2 course lunch. ($1US = $1.5AU so about $23US)

And just at the corner there's an interesting name for a cafe
 

kjel

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
12,384
Points
39
And just at the corner there's an interesting name for a cafe
It's a quote from the British show Keeping Up Appearances :ha:
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
28,249
Points
71
Can someone explain to me why this location is designated as a 'train station'? An important stop for folks who are interested in collecting sand?
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
25,576
Points
59
Eudora, AR could compete with Cairo, IL for ghost town main street


Look what Parkdale, AR has on their main street
 
  • Like
Reactions: Dan

SlaveToTheGrind

Cyburbian
Messages
1,387
Points
26
Look what Parkdale, AR has on their main street
[/QUOTE]

I was waiting for the tumbleweed to roll across the road.
 

TOFB

Cyburbian
Messages
2,429
Points
29
Sad to see this old ballroom where I have played countless gigs is shut down.

It sits in a hole about 50 yds from a River; thus the floodwall.

Check out the name through the partial obscuring. F-Land
 

SlaveToTheGrind

Cyburbian
Messages
1,387
Points
26
Out in southwest Montana on I-15, there is a north facing slope covered in evergreen trees. As you can see, the surrounding area is bare other than prairie grasses. Perfect micro-climate and orientation to allow such growth. Always find it interesting when I drive by.
PineTop.JPGPineTop2.JPG
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
25,576
Points
59
Levee maintenance at Old Shawneetown, Illinois


change the streetview
2012 before
2016 after
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
18,521
Points
69
Want to be as far from COVID-19 as possible, but you don't want to go to the middle of the desert? Head to Liberal, Kansas. According to the Johns Hopkins COVID-19 map, there's no cases for a couple hundred miles around the city. Garden City and Dodge City are also COVID-19 free, but Liberal is in the middle of the no-COVID zone. Life in these little western Kansas towns might be boring. They all have small "other side of the tracks" neighborhoods, but otherwise they seem like idyllic middle class meccas from the air and on the ground. They're not shrinking, so they're doing something right -- my guess is welcoming immigrants.

Wide streets everywhere. Fire chiefs must love it.

This house.

A standard 1920s-era planned subdivision. And a mid-century modern house in the middle. I saw a lot of them Googledriving Garden City, too.

Seems like the 1950s and 1960s were boom times for Liberal, based on the bulk of the housing stock.

The hosuing stock isn't that diverse, though. Lots of ranches, ramblers, some mobile homes, and a few working class apartment complexes.

Every city has to have an east side.

Downtown has seen better days. No facade restoration here; aside from the vacancies, it's straight out of the 1950s.

There's a bunch of 1950s motels. Even the commercial signs are out of the 1960s.

Vehicle-oriented commercial. Meh.

I'm going to bet the Mexican food is probably pretty good in Liberal.

I'd rather ride out the zombies in Garden City.
 

willbaska

Member
Messages
1
Points
0
Want to be as far from COVID-19 as possible, but you don't want to go to the middle of the desert? Head to Liberal, Kansas. According to the Johns Hopkins COVID-19 map, there's no cases for a couple hundred miles around the city. Garden City and Dodge City are also COVID-19 free, but Liberal is in the middle of the no-COVID zone. Life in these little western Kansas towns might be boring. They all have small "other side of the tracks" neighborhoods, but otherwise they seem like idyllic middle class meccas from the air and on the ground. They're not shrinking, so they're doing something right -- my guess is welcoming immigrants.

Wide streets everywhere. Fire chiefs must love it.

This house.

A standard 1920s-era planned subdivision. And a mid-century modern house in the middle. I saw a lot of them Googledriving Garden City, too.

Seems like the 1950s and 1960s were boom times for Liberal, based on the bulk of the housing stock.

The hosuing stock isn't that diverse, though. Lots of ranches, ramblers, some mobile homes, and a few working class apartment complexes.

Every city has to have an east side.

Downtown has seen better days. No facade restoration here; aside from the vacancies, it's straight out of the 1950s.

There's a bunch of 1950s motels. Even the commercial signs are out of the 1960s.

Vehicle-oriented commercial. Meh.

I'm going to bet the Mexican food is probably pretty good in Liberal.

I'd rather ride out the zombies in Garden City.
Fascinating. Gotta love a good western Kansas town. Reminds me of No Country for Old Men when I go out there. My mother was from Colby.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Dan

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
14,631
Points
51
Liberal might actually have good Mexican food. The nearby slaughter houses hire a lot of migrants.

Lived in Salina too long. They're all shut down before any of this crap spreads to them.
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
25,576
Points
59
I used to live down this lane in Synder, TX in the house on the side NOT at the end.
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
14,631
Points
51
I'm not sure about small towns in Maine and their attitudes, maybe LP can tell us, but Kansas small towns are afraid of everything and will jump ahead of most of the country in protecting people against the problem. They're still afraid of the 1980's gang activity from LA and don't get them started on drugs. They provided parents tips on spotting drug dealers around your kids. Apparently the in school dealers have started wearing t-shirts with kittens on them. My kids still laugh at that one and now one several shirts with kittens.

Yes, any Kansas small town could easily be a Steven King book.
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
12,829
Points
51
There's something in the middle of this lake - wait, its a car!
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
28,249
Points
71

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
18,521
Points
69
Dan needs to admit he has a THING for South Africa. That's okay, I have a THING about islands and other extremely remote communities.
It's sort of like Southern California, if they drove on the wrong side of the road, allowed advertising in the right-of-way, had Jim Crow-style segregation that lasted into the 1990s, and a Gini coefficient that makes the Mississippi Delta seem like Norway in comparison. I'm fascinated with its aspect of being an outpost of post-WWII Anglosphere vehicle-oriented urbanism, with a dystopian twist of heavy fortification and Apartheid-era townships.

The racial makeup of the population is the opposite of the US -- about 12% white/Asian, 88% black/biracial. The white population is generally lower-middle to upper-middle class by American standards. Black people in SA as a whole are much poorer than their peers in the US. Yes, there's a growing black middle class. Still, South African cities remind me of the developed world/developing world divide along the Rio Grande, only without a national boundary in the way.

Here's the neighborhood in Buffalo, New York, where I grew up. In the 1970s and 1980s, it was racially integrated, and generally lower middle to middle class. Middle class and whites and blacks moved away between the mid-1980s through the mid-2000s, and today, the area about 90% black (with some white holdouts). Poverty and all the related indicators (single mothers, schoolchildren on free lunch programs, high school dropout rate, etc.) are high. Buffalonians now consider this area as a generally poor to working class area. (There are some islands of affluence, though, with far more holdouts.) An equivalent "middle class flight" neighborhood in Johannesburg might be Yeoville, which resegregated after apartheid ended. Much of Soweto is quite nice, almost like a fortified version of a 1950s starter suburb in the States or Canada. However, it's far more common to see neighborhoods with street patterns that look vaguely North American suburban from the air, but with a much different story on the ground. They're huge subdivisions with a monoculture of tiny houses, mostly far removed from employment centers. Many of these developments were planned and developed long after apartheid ended.

Look around this intersection in Sandton, or this one, and you could just as well be looking at any suburban neighborhood gone edge city in the US, like Westheimer Road in Houston, or Fairfax Drive in Arlington. (Except for the driving on the wrong side of the road, of course.). However, Alexandria Township is about a mile away, and it's nothing like Arlington's neighbor with the same name. And this, too.

I still want to visit someday, though. Seffricans are generally friendly folks.

I'm waiting on comprehensive Google Streetview coverage for Namibia and Zimbabwe, especially the north side of Harare. What do those old Rhodie neighborhoods look like 40 years after independence?
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
18,521
Points
69
Best wings in Buffalo!

(My favorite. At CNU 22, it'sw here I introduced a group of planners from Austin to real Buffalo-style wings and urbanism. They came back just about every night.)

(Some say this is the best of the best)

(My parents actually met here back in the 1950s!)

(For the tourists)

(A corner bar in a neighborhood with a "you need a passport to visit" reputation)

(In the same old-school ethnic stronghold. If you value your life, do NOT wear orange in here. Even if you claim to be a Syracuse fan, or Buff State alumni, just don't do it.)

(A block away from my #1)

(Underrated. Same for next door.)
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
12,829
Points
51
Traffic was light this morning coming in to work at the market...

 
Top