Favorite style?

Suburb Repairman

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#3
I love craftsman-style homes:

http://georgiamagazine.com/counties/glynn/photos/gly-272.jpg

http://www.shna.net/homes/703emmett.jpg

http://www.jeffersoncountytrails.org/HTrail/HT_PICS/pic34A.jpg

(note that the last one has a solar panel on the roof :D

Why I like them:
the neighborhoods they are usually in (historic, walkable, close to stuff)
simple lines
cool ways to customize like adding gingerbread, etc.
large front porch
garage where it belongs--behind the house usually
pier & beam construction (slabs are a nightmare for serious remodelling)
often have high ceilings with crown molding or tin
usually have wood floors.
 
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SkeLeton

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#4
For me and I believe, common sense, Architecture styles should be somewhat influenced by the climate, for an example: For Valdivia my Favourite styles are:
-Tudor (Rarely seen here in Chile and I don't know any tudor style house in Valdivia)
http://architecture.about.com/library/graphics/bodnantwales02.jpg
The thing is, that most of Valdivias' architecture is modern BS mass production of the same model made by one developer that builds only like 2 or 3 styles of houses that don't fit very well into a generic category, and the historic buildings that survived both the 1909 fire and the 1960 quake, are a german style that's vernacular to southern Chile, since I haven't seen that style elsewhere (Not even in Germany) which consists in a house, normally rectangular with the exterior in a tin cover. The cielings are high (around 3m high) and has plenty of terraces and corridors that are closed with glass.

This is an example of the similar houses in Valparaiso, although Valdivian houses have a bit more details in the tin exterior.

For Santiago, the typical mediterranean style, with adobe tiles and stucco walls.
I have no pics of that style but they're everywhere here.
 
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#5
I'm a "Vernacular" type of guy

I’m not sure what you call these exactly, but there is a certain house type in Toledo that was once quite prevalent in the old German and Polish sections of town and found nowhere else. They were mostly built between 1882 and 1902, with a side gabled footprint, off-center entrance and a prominant gable pediment, or "false gable" usually located off-center in the roofline. Kind of a "Gothic Vernacular".

What is most unusual about these houses though is that they are usually set way back on the lot with some lacking windows and porches on the front elevation. I speculate that the original facades were only temporary: As the family grew and acquired more money, an extension was added onto the front (hence the reason for the deep setback) and resulting in the house being changed into a "Gabled Ell" footprint. Indeed there are many gabled Ells in this section of Toledo that look suspiciously like Side Gabled houses with a later Ell extension.

But in one part of town - the Lenk's Hill/Kuschwantz sections, many of these houses were never changed, such as in the cases below. Windows and porches may have been added onto the front, but no gable front extension was ever built.





Note how recessed this house is in relation to it's neighbors. Also no windows and no porch.



Moderator note:
Image link broken


Before And After Pictures of another setback house.



Moderator note:
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Unsually decorative examples



Only one window in front and no porch.



Same as above, but with 2nd story window.

Moderator note:
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This one is a duplicate to the one directly above (note solitary first story front window)
except it has a porch. It was probably a later addition.

Moderator note:
Image link broken




Again, the porch is probably not original on these two models, both built about 1893
and similar in treatment.



In this example, both houses have the same side gabled profile. However, the house at
the right extends much further to the front of the lot, while the subject house remains
recessed. Most likely, the house at right was probably once a duplicate to the subject
house but was later added onto the front.

Moderator note:
Image link broken


In this example, the gable pediment is more centered than most other examples.

I think these houses are very unique and significant because they were built by their owners with intention of being added onto later, sort of like an 19th Century Levittown.
They may be a truly “Toledo” house type and are some of the last remaining remnants of the original German or Polish folk housing from the 1880s and 1890s. Unfortunately, these houses are rapidly approaching extinction. They are located in a section of town that is rapidly evaporating as a result of abandonment and attending neglect, vandalism and demolition.

Here is the gallery of these house types:
http://www.cyburbia.org/gallery/sho...rnacular&what=allfields&name=&when=&whenterm=
 
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BKM

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#6
There are several "styles" I really like.

Of course, the West Coast craftsman vernacular is high on my list.





Classic Spanish Romantic Revival can be quite nice as well!



But, I prefer more urban housing "types" like townhouses that create walkable mixed use urban neighborhoods:

Brown Shingle Version:


Classic bow-front two-flat!


Or even varied row houses in diverse styles all lined up to make a nicely defined street



If I had to choose a very favorite housing style/housing environment, though, it would be the Boston and Philadelphia red brick Federal Style rowhouse-located preferrably on a narrow, gentrified cobblestone alley. Give me Louisburg Square over a suburban McMansion any day of the week! (No pics)
 
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NHPlanner

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Cardinal

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#11
I like too many styles to choose just one. Romanesque, Italianate, Shingle, Craftsman, Tudor and Prairie styles are all great.
 

BKM

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#15
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Tresmo

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#16
Ditto.

I love Craftsman bungalows, specifically. They have huge front porches that are fantastic for lounging, reading a book, and talking with friends and neighbors. I like a little smaller than this one so that it is roomy without being huge (I don't really need a huge upstairs, although I don't have kids, so that is probably why-ask me in a few years!). I'm sick of living in huge spaces that allow junk to accumulate. If I don't have space for it, I suddenly am less attached to old magazines, clothes, and junk in general!

These homes are often in neighborhoods that I admire, old historic areas close to downtowns with well-kept neighbors and pretty walkways, flowers, big old trees, and all that fun stuff. :)

I'd find some more pictures but I haven't really used pics on this... don't want to get suspended! Someday I'll have to find out the official way to so it!
 
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