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Feminized urbanism: is there a name for this kind of neighborhood?

Dan

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Today I went to check out my old neighborhood in northwest Denver; the West Highland/Berkeley neighborhood. (I took hundreds of photos, and I'll post them later.) If there's an area that is the antithesis of RUGGED!, this is probably it. The neighborhood has gentrified beyond recognition since I sold my little bungalow in 2000. 32nd Street is now lined with baby boutiques, chocolate boutiques, purse boutiques, stores with perky lime green signs, day spas, yoga studios, wellness centers, and the like. Tennyson Avenue still has an old-man barber shop, a tattoo studio, a biker bar and an old-school lunch-only diner, but it's facing feminization with yoga studios, upscale salons, a French restaurant, and a new "sustainable" baby boutique. Everywhere I turned, I was at risk for being run over by an attractive twentysomething mommy with an SUV stroller.

So, is there a name for this kind of neighborhood? Ever encounter this phenomenon elsewhere?













 

beach_bum

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The downtown in my fair town has alot of these types of businesses coming in, organic baby boutique, check, pilates studio, check....anyways, I think its a reflection of the who spends the money in a household, and I think females do the majority of the shopping and like to browse in shops moreso then men. During the week day in downtown here, its mostly females shopping, the men only come to go to lunch or work. To me it reminds me of malls, you see many more clothing stores for females and the ladies departments are much larger in big box stores/department stores because females like to shop for the most part. Men-hunters, females-gathers :D
 

CJC

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Sounds like Noe Valley in San Francisco. I've never heard of a name for this type of neighborhood, but Noe Valley is basically the neighborhood that all of the Marina (another neighborhood populated by a lot of fresh out of college sorority girls living on daddy's money) girls move to when they get married and start having kids.

I cracked up with your mention of a "sustainable" baby boutique, because some friends and I were making fun of the exact same thing in Noe Valley last weekend. It seems that your old neighborhood is seriously lacking in upscale dog hotels and boutiques though. Perhaps a spa for mom and mutt?
 

natski

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I would be keen to know the demographics for the area- there has to be a lot of stay at home mums (not that there is anything wrong with that at all- just saying) and probably high socio economic status.
 

DetroitPlanner

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I would be keen to know the demographics for the area- there has to be a lot of stay at home mums (not that there is anything wrong with that at all- just saying) and probably high socio economic status.
I would think the opposite is true, with guilt-ridden working moms running amok to rationalize their existence through spending too much on silly crap for themselves and babies. Most likely this is the kind oof dual income neighborhood where everyone is broke the day before payday, and they don't put away $$ for retirement.
 

Zoning Goddess

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"Feminized urbanity: is there a name for this kind of neighborhood? "

Yeah, upscale and overpriced. Kinda like guys buying camo at Bass Pro Shops when they could buy the same thing at K-Mart for 80% less. :r:
 

kjel

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Reminds me of Park Slope in Brooklyn or NW 23rd in Portland.
 

Woolley

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I would be keen to know the demographics for the area- there has to be a lot of stay at home mums (not that there is anything wrong with that at all- just saying) and probably high socio economic status.
Same, I know in Australia it is pretty easy to gain key statistics through the ABS. Devonport in Tasmainia is more of a town rather than a suburb. But it has a high number of females compared to males (92.9 males per 100 females) with 1 in 37.74 females having a baby each year (ABS 2006). Feminsm Meetup groups? Never thought I would hear of such a thing.

I think certain areas have qualities and appearances traditionally associated with gender specific stigma. In the Lucashenko novel Steam Pigs it states that the suburbs are feminised and the inner city masculinised. It regards the West End (Brisbane) as convincingly masculinised. ‘Working-class in its culture of cars, alcohol and violence’. Everything gets reconfigured to make things more desirable. Building houses closer to schools, shopping centres etc. Everything is gender gapped. There are differences between males and females on economic, social and cultural levels. It is the state of being female or male and we have our cultural and social differences that are important to us, give us a sense of identity. Suburbs can be gender committed experiences. The majority of people living in suburbia are families. While it is socially accepted that women are no longer expected to stay at home and the men go out and work, it is the way families still structure and function. ;)

 

illinoisplanner

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A lot of the suburban downtowns in my area are like this. Day spas, art studios, hair salons, dog grooming boutiques, female-oriented gift shops, etc. I think a lot of it has to do with high disposable income levels, a good number of stay-at-home or work-from-home moms in the area, and the fact that most of these businesses are run by women who want to cater to women. Also, since it's mostly women who stay in the area during the day, that's the demographic all the businesses in the area need to cater to, otherwise they won't get any daytime foot traffic. Also, a lot of these women business owners have spouses with very-high paying jobs and so they can dabble in running their own small business comfortably.

Otherwise, most of the rest of the independent businesses are either bars and restaurants that rely on nighttime and weekend foot traffic. Anything else usually fails.
 

mendelman

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"Third Wave Feminist Towne" - I embrace my femininity by having received my JD at Stanford, married a classmate/equal, then be a stay at home mother because we don't need me to work and daycares are nothing but disease factories anyhow.

:lmao:
 

Dan

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More estrogen-rich scenes from West Highlands. And just what is the deal with lime green, anyhow?



























 

MacheteJames

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Reminds me of downtown Newburyport, MA, or Tarrytown and Bronxville, NY. Looks like it'd be a rather nice place to live in a lot of ways What's the density in a neighborhood like this? Say, 3,000-4,000 people/square mile? I like this type of chilled-out version of urbanity a lot, personally.
 

Seabishop

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It makes sense for these businesses to appeal to women. Most men wouldn't be as interested in upscale, little retail shops. *

How do I get to spend the day photographing attractive women in an upscale neighborhood? ;)


* I'm assuming I can say that without this turning into another debate about gender roles.
 

southsideamy

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Wow -- some sarcasm there! As a middle thirties chick/mom (not upper class, however), I would love that kind of place - which seems pretty free of chain stores and looks like the kind of place where I would enjoy hanging out.

The last two towns I lived in Michigan had the same feminine downtown and were really successful in capturing the expendible income of middle/upper class women - who, BTW, make almost all the purchasing decisions in most families (and my family is no exception). Both downtowns had lovely gift stores, clothing stores, bra shops with personal fitters, purse shops, upscale salons, lovely coffee shops, wine shops, gourmet food stores, and even (gasp) tea rooms. And both of these towns marketing themselves to women, almost exclusively.

When I want to spend an afternoon with my chicas hanging out, we often go to a nearby town here on the southside of chicago that offers a similar venue. I wish my downtown had these type of stores. I would love to push a stroller, hold a latte, and shriek over a perfect bottle of bath gel that I discovered.

I know it's not for all women, but how is this any different than the typical men's scene in some big cities: speak-easy bars, steakhouses, cigar shops, wine/scotch stores, Tony Bahama? Target marketing! It's where it's at.
 

Veloise

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Wow -- some sarcasm there! As a middle thirties chick/mom (not upper class, however), I would love that kind of place - which seems pretty free of chain stores and looks like the kind of place where I would enjoy hanging out.

The last two towns I lived in Michigan had the same feminine downtown and were really successful in capturing the expendible income of middle/upper class women - who, BTW, make almost all the purchasing decisions in most families (and my family is no exception). Both downtowns had lovely gift stores, clothing stores, bra shops with personal fitters, purse shops, upscale salons, lovely coffee shops, wine shops, gourmet food stores, and even (gasp) tea rooms. And both of these towns marketing themselves to women, almost exclusively.

When I want to spend an afternoon with my chicas hanging out, we often go to a nearby town here on the southside of chicago that offers a similar venue. I wish my downtown had these type of stores. I would love to push a stroller, hold a latte, and shriek over a perfect bottle of bath gel that I discovered.

I know it's not for all women, but how is this any different than the typical men's scene in some big cities: speak-easy bars, steakhouses, cigar shops, wine/scotch stores, Tony Bahama? Target marketing! It's where it's at.
Post of the day. (Highlights mine.. <3!)

Typical men's scene: includes blank walls in semi-secluded alleys.
 

otterpop

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I could definitely see grabbing a table by the sidewalk at one of the cafes and watching the parade of ladies.

I am an easy dog to keep on the porch but it doesn't keep me from watching the traffic. :p
 

Duke Of Dystopia

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Place name for the urban estrogen infused nieghborhood with all the baby shops:

BREEDERVIL! :6:

(running for cover fast)! :D
 

wahday

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Its surprising to me that these trendy shops (or shoppes) are doing well in this climate. This is one of the tenuous aspects of rejuvenated shopping districts with small retail spaces - that they will all turn into boutique stores. By this, I mean places that serve up some type of luxury item or service rather than being, say, the corner food market or something else that is more necessity-based. Sure, all parents need diapers, but in hard times, how many can afford ones made of hemp and stamped with a cutesy lime green label? Yes, being active is good, but how many can afford to go to the eco-renovated, bamboo-floored yoga studio three times a week? Judging by the activity in the pictures, evidently plenty of folks int his neighborhood.

As for the assumption that these are all wives of men who make the big bucks, one has to be careful about how things appear and what is really going on. If these women were also working, these would be the nannies or daycare providers taking the kids out for a stroll and we would be judging that as well. Kids need taking care of and whose to say that these ladies aren't also working part-time somewhere? I agree that the appearance is one of well-off young mothers having fun without a care in the world, but they are out caring for their children and this should be a positive activity and not drudgery (for those parents among us, we know there is plenty of drudgery anyway).

These are great photos, though. I had no idea anything like this existed in Denver. It looks an awful lot like a few places in Albuquerque (probably the same era of development for these streetcar suburb-type areas). I need to get out more.
 

Rygor

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More estrogen-rich scenes from West Highlands. And just what is the deal with lime green, anyhow?
I think it's because lime green is trendy, eye-catching, and evokes a sense of environmental friendliness which is all the rage.

My guess is that neighborhood is likely full of DINK's and young, well-to-do families. Probably highly educated. It reminds me a lot of parts of Wicker Park, Lincoln Park, and Lakeview neighborhoods in Chicago.
 

beach_bum

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Place name for the urban estrogen infused nieghborhood with all the baby shops:

BREEDERVIL! :6:

(running for cover fast)! :D
(wipes water from screen)

I wonder if there is a correlation between number of stay at home moms and the success of one of these types of shopping districts? As a working woman, I would only patronize at lunch or on the weekends, but i'll bet women that stay at home with their kids go during the week days and shop for eco-baby stuff and monogramed stationary. Coming from a historic preservation perspective, I think these districts are great, they bring people in and they spend money which in turn helps maintain the district.
 

Queen B

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Name of it. Free Market.
If you provide a service someone else will pay for.

( Dan, just think if you had stayed there you would probably be the daddy for one of those mom's pushing the baby buggy! Pregnancy is a high pressure deal among girls that age! )( now that I say that your interpretation of my comment could be, OMG!she is right or WOW you are right why didn't I stay I would be settled my now! No hard feeling either way, as my tag line says. All a matter of perspective.) QB slinks away and hides.
 

Maister

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This feminine marketing is not limited exclusively to urban areas. I think we&#8217;re neglecting to identify their rural counterparts. They may not have quite the same frou frou exterior glitz, and one might have to drive quite a ways to get there, but even country gals need a special place to shop now and then.

There&#8217;s the (usually faux) native American merchandise store



Featuring the finest in native American crafts. Where else should one go to buy their: medicine bags, art, jewelry, dream catchers, black tees, fancy baskets, and other merchandise?





And let&#8217;s not forget all those cowgirls who need a special place to shop too. There&#8217;s often some overlapping with the merchandise described above, but the equestrian/country emphasis is there in more significant proportions. Sometimes it shares space (or is synonymous) with tack shops:





Catering to that inner &#8216;sassy cowgal&#8217;

 
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Dan

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I think it's because lime green is trendy, eye-catching, and evokes a sense of environmental friendliness which is all the rage.

My guess is that neighborhood is likely full of DINK's and young, well-to-do families. Probably highly educated. It reminds me a lot of parts of Wicker Park, Lincoln Park, and Lakeview neighborhoods in Chicago.
I would guess the same thing; green invokes environmentalism, and the lime green makes it OH MY GOD SO FUN WOOOO!

What I saw in West Highlands/Berkeley yesterday, and to some extent the Stapleton development today, really reminded me of the late, lamented Lincoln Park Trixie Society Web site; upper middle class women living in small houses or condos in gentrified urban neighborhoods with their Chads and, if they're lucky, babies.
 

Veloise

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...( Dan, just think if you had stayed there you would probably be the daddy for one of those mom's pushing the baby buggy! ...
Mebbe that explains the gazillion shots Dan took, looking for a likely suspect 8yo (did I do the math right?).
 

illinoisplanner

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illinoisplanner said:
Also, a lot of these women business owners have spouses with very-high paying jobs and so they can dabble in running their own small business comfortably.
Assumed, or documented fact?

You guys are being jerks about all this, I hope you know that.
Notice, I said "a lot", not all. And that statement just applies for my town, from my experiences with our businesses as part of my work-related responsibilities in working with businesses in our area. Sure, there are a few women that run these places independently and where their survival depends on the success of their business, but I know from experience, that there are plenty of women (in my area) that do dabble in these sorts of business ventures as supplemental income because they already make enough, either in another job, or from their spouse.
 

btrage

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Notice, I said "a lot", not all. And that statement just applies for my town, from my experiences with our businesses as part of my work-related responsibilities in working with businesses in our area. Sure, there are a few women that run these places independently and where their survival depends on the success of their business, but I know from experience, that there are plenty of women (in my area) that do dabble in these sorts of business ventures as supplemental income because they already make enough, either in another job, or from their spouse.
This may be true of "your experience", but I agree with ZG that the notion that wives are "playing" with their husband's money is pretty degrading.

As "A Dude", I'd much rather walk around one of these "feminine urban areas" than some prototypical neighborhood business district with a bar, a barbershop, a few small-time restaurants, a bookstore and a coffee shop.

Or maybe I just like looking at women more than I think. :p
 

illinoisplanner

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This may be true of "your experience", but I agree with ZG that the notion that wives are "playing" with their husband's money is pretty degrading.

As "A Dude", I'd much rather walk around one of these "feminine urban areas" than some prototypical neighborhood business district with a bar, a barbershop, a few small-time restaurants, a bookstore and a coffee shop.

Or maybe I just like looking at women more than I think. :p
Well, I guess the truth hurts sometimes. Like I said, it's not true in all circumstances, but it certainly does occur and I have my own personal experiences to back it up. But, I've also seen the complete opposite, where the women are the breadwinners because of their successful endeavors.

Nevertheless, I think these businesses are great and I enjoy walking around in my town much more because of their existence. They bring an element of uniqueness & character, daytime activity, and they really enchance the independent business climate. And my downtown would be the equivalent of a bar, barbershop, restaurants, insurance/realty offices, and that's it, were it not for these businesses. It's really a nice eclectic mix.
 

Rygor

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Nevertheless, I think these businesses are great and I enjoy walking around in my town much more because of their existence. They bring an element of uniqueness & character, daytime activity, and they really enchance the independent business climate. And my downtown would be the equivalent of a bar, barbershop, restaurants, insurance/realty offices, and that's it, were it not for these businesses. It's really a nice eclectic mix.
Agreed. We just started attracting a lot of these types of businesses to our downtown whereas we had almost none before. The majority are female owned. Many of them have some sort of art component to them which has added greatly to the character and ambience of the downtown, and has begun to attract a younger, hipper crowd than I think used to go downtown. There are more people on the sidewalks than I can remember since moving here 11 years ago, so I'm all for the urbanized femininity, Breederville, or whatever you want to call it as it seems to have a positive economic effect that is good for the City.
 

mike gurnee

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After reading these posts, I changed my opinion. I would enjoy living there and watching the dynamics of this revitalization.
 

Super Amputee Cat

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So, is there a name for this kind of neighborhood? Ever encounter this phenomenon elsewhere?
I hate places like this. Not for what they were but for what they've become. If you cater to the suburban yuppie soccer mom types, you're automatically going to get fake, santized, generic noplaces like this. Anyone in need of a hardware store or second hand goods store is $hit out of luck.

This kind of places make me feel good about the economy in the tank. I want them to fail. Hopefully the entitled elitist pricks that run these places will go under because people will finally come to their senses and stop buying this overpriced, sanitized crap. But it seems unlikely. As soon as the economy rebounds, the high-maintanance yuppies that see value in these meaningless places will be out in droves spending like nothing ever happened.
 

Zoning Goddess

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I hate places like this.
I hae places like this, too, and I won't pay their prices. You can get perfectly good kids' clothes at chain stores, and nobody needs gourmet dog treats, as long as you occasinally cook beef and throw the dog a bone. The main drag of my hometown is full of overpriced specialty stores and I could maybe afford a backscratcher ($5 or so) from Restoration Hardware, but that's about it on the whole street.

My comment was based on the idea that all these "what my generation would have called yuppie shops" are hobby shops for trophy wives to run.

When will the day come when we look at some overpriced business and say "There you go, another a$$hat third husband playing store."?
 

btrage

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I hate places like this. Not for what they were but for what they've become. If you cater to the suburban yuppie soccer mom types, you're automatically going to get fake, santized, generic noplaces like this. Anyone in need of a hardware store or second hand goods store is $hit out of luck.

This kind of places make me feel good about the economy in the tank. I want them to fail. Hopefully the entitled elitist pricks that run these places will go under because people will finally come to their senses and stop buying this overpriced, sanitized crap. But it seems unlikely. As soon as the economy rebounds, the high-maintanance yuppies that see value in these meaningless places will be out in droves spending like nothing ever happened.
I hae places like this, too, and I won't pay their prices. You can get perfectly good kids' clothes at chain stores, and nobody needs gourmet dog treats, as long as you occasinally cook beef and throw the dog a bone. The main drag of my hometown is full of overpriced specialty stores and I could maybe afford a backscratcher ($5 or so) from Restoration Hardware, but that's about it on the whole street.

My comment was based on the idea that all these "what my generation would have called yuppie shops" are hobby shops for trophy wives to run.

When will the day come when we look at some overpriced business and say "There you go, another a$$hat third husband playing store."?
Jealous perhaps?

May I ask what's the alternative? Gentrification is sometimes a nasty word, but it's better than the alternative, in my opinion.
 

Super Amputee Cat

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Dan, all these pictures are starting to make me feel nauseated.

Again, everthing looks so fake and sanitized, ever the more so jarring considering its against a backdrop of authentic, albiet extremely degraded, buildings.

If I could describe it in another word: Soulless



This picture stands out as a perfect example of how cookie-cutter these kind of no-places are. The people in this picture look exactly the same as they do in every other little snob-yuppie no-place, be it Stone Harbor New Jersey, Naperville, Illinois, or Stepford, Connecticut. You could take these four women - and the douchy-looking guy at the table - and transplant them to any snob suburb elsewhere and no one would ever know the difference.

These are the kind of people you see in those "upscale" and trendy Wal-Mart commercials of late. Or Sapphic Erotica. Take your pick.

I can't stress enough how meaningless and empty these kind of places are. Peel away the superficial surface layer and there really is nothing there at all.
 
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Luca

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Dan: “So, is there a name for this kind of neighborhood? Ever encounter this phenomenon elsewhere?”


Natski:
“…there has to be a lot of stay at home mums (not that there is anything wrong with that at all- just saying) and probably high socio economic status.”


“What ZoningGoddess said. I would cringe if my neighborhood turned into that kind of crap.”

I don’t GET IT people.

The neighborhood pictured by Dan looks:
> prosperous
> with a healthy, young demographic
> with nice street-level retail mixed into a residential area

WHAT exactly is not to like? Lime green or frozen yogurt may come and go but that looks to me like a GOOD place.

Or are we still in the “I like grunge; though not personally for me, because it gives me an aura of street cred” stage????
 

Wannaplan?

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WHAT exactly is not to like? Lime green or frozen yogurt may come and go but that looks to me like a GOOD place.
Yeah, I'm not quite getting the gist of this thread either. I mean, "feminized urbanism" is a rather provocative title for this thread, and I'm surprised more criticism hasn't been heaped upon Dan. (Maybe it's a way to draw some "Google Juice" to Cyburbia?) But I think more people take a thread of this type created by him with a grain of salt, given his "equal opportunity" observations of "rugged" suburban strips in the past. His observations are always fun and interesting to read, to say the least.
 

Rygor

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Dan: “So, is there a name for this kind of neighborhood? Ever encounter this phenomenon elsewhere?”


Natski:
“…there has to be a lot of stay at home mums (not that there is anything wrong with that at all- just saying) and probably high socio economic status.”


“What ZoningGoddess said. I would cringe if my neighborhood turned into that kind of crap.”

I don’t GET IT people.

The neighborhood pictured by Dan looks:
> prosperous
> with a healthy, young demographic
> with nice street-level retail mixed into a residential area

WHAT exactly is not to like? Lime green or frozen yogurt may come and go but that looks to me like a GOOD place.

Or are we still in the “I like grunge; though not personally for me, because it gives me an aura of street cred” stage????
I'm with ya. I don't exactly see the problem there...

Vibrant paint schemes
Nice signage
Busy sidewalks
Occupied storefronts

Maybe it's just coming from my economic developer perspective, but isn't that what most cities WANT? Isn't that especially what most want in their downtowns? Aren't those some of the very things that the Main Street Program tries to promote?

What's wrong with fostering an entrepeneurial spirit? Maybe it's not the goods you want to buy, but if such places survive then there are clearly enough people out there that do. A market is being served. Would you say the same thing if it were a bunch of second-hand and dollar stores serving a poor populace?
 

Dan

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Great discussion, all.

It makes sense for these businesses to appeal to women. Most men wouldn't be as interested in upscale, little retail shops. *
But ... there are plenty of upscale urban neighborhoods that don't seem to have the "Girls only! Boys keep out!" character that West Highland increasingly has. Take Williamsville, New York, for example; there's stores on Main Street that sell golfing supplies, high-end men's clothing and accessories, and upscale gender-neutral businesses like opticians, art galleries, and coffee houses,

Yes, there are girly-girl uses on Main:

1buffalo_williamsville_021.jpg

But they don't dominate.

1buffalo_williamsville_006.jpg

1buffalo_williamsville_005.jpg

1buffalo_williamsville_035.jpg

1buffalo_williamsville_036.jpg

1buffalo_williamsville_004.jpg

Williamsville does have a couple of fatal flaws; a busy four lane road with parking lanes running through the middle of it, and a staid "carriage trade" flavor that makes it something of a throwback to the 1970s. Yes, there's even a store on Main that specializes in European educational toys, something that disappeared from so many "quaint" villages and old-money urban neighborhoods years ago.

Elmwood Avenue in Buffalo -- and I should get some more current photos when I head back to visit for a reunion next week -- has a lot of girly boutiques, but again they don't overwhelm.

Chagrin Falls, Ohio has its share of boutiques, but it isn't overwelmingly "BOYS KEEP OUT!" girly-girly. Something for everyone, from the old guard carriage trade crowd to younger adults.

1cleveland_chagrin_falls_10.jpg

1cleveland_chagrin_falls_17.jpg

1cleveland_chagrin_falls_29.jpg

1cleveland_chagrin_falls_26.jpg

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1cleveland_chagrin_falls_15.jpg

A scene you definitely won't find in West Highland ...

1cleveland_chagrin_falls_16.jpg

Speaking of lime green, here's a few West Highland buildings that I neglected to photograph. I found these on another site.

http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd187/denveraztec/Denver/2009 West Highlands/WestHighlands_192.jpg
Yeah, the sign is in Papyrus.

http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd187/denveraztec/Denver/2009 West Highlands/WestHighlands_095.jpg[

There's even lime green townhouses!

http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd187/denveraztec/Denver/2009 West Highlands/2008_0518Lakeside0224.jpg

The baby boutique in West Highland used to be a furniture store. One of the purse stores was a restaurant known for having a great breakfast; the other sold interior accessories.

Please understand that West Highland isn't entirely filled with yoga studios and boutiques with lime-green signs. There's a couple of pubs, a deli/ice cream parlor, a couple of coffee shops (one chain, one indie), one of the original Chipotle locations, an upscale wine store, and a pizzeria. It's just that I've never seen a neighborhood retail district that was so oriented towards Generation Y/young Generation X upper-middle-class urban women than West 32nd.
 

stroskey

Cyburbian
Messages
1,212
Points
17
This may be true of "your experience", but I agree with ZG that the notion that wives are "playing" with their husband's money is pretty degrading.
As "A Dude", I'd much rather walk around one of these "feminine urban areas" than some prototypical neighborhood business district with a bar, a barbershop, a few small-time restaurants, a bookstore and a coffee shop.
Or maybe I just like looking at women more than I think. :p
In my experience the women who run these shops have wealthy husbands. That's not to say they weren't well-off before they got married but on the street like this were I grew up the women who owned these kinds of shops all had spouses who were doctors or high-priced lawyers. I know this because a large percentage went to our church. I don't think that's degrading in any way to suggest that may be why they are geared towards women. Women who are used to staying home because they don't need to work will probably create stores that cater to women who are just like them... well-off with plenty of free time.

I hate places like this. Not for what they were but for what they've become. If you cater to the suburban yuppie soccer mom types, you're automatically going to get fake, santized, generic noplaces like this. Anyone in need of a hardware store or second hand goods store is $hit out of luck.

This kind of places make me feel good about the economy in the tank. I want them to fail. Hopefully the entitled elitist pricks that run these places will go under because people will finally come to their senses and stop buying this overpriced, sanitized crap. But it seems unlikely. As soon as the economy rebounds, the high-maintanance yuppies that see value in these meaningless places will be out in droves spending like nothing ever happened.
I hope you're not the same person that complains about Walmarts after reading this. Also, how insensitive do you have to be to wish harm to these people who are trying to make a good store and fill a gap in the local economy? That's like wishing everyone who bought a Hummer would crash and die because of their fuel economy. It's not just opinions here, it's people's lives you're talking about.
 

jmello

Cyburbian
Messages
2,583
Points
22
Femitopia..with Park Slope, Brooklyn being the epicenter. More baby carriages and nannies than you can shake a stick at. Jamaica Plain in Boston is a close runner up, but that's still a little too granola.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
17,765
Points
58
In my experience the women who run these shops have wealthy husbands.
It might seem degrading, but in my experience it's true. A business plan to sell Etsy-style handmade purses of a very specific style in a retail space leasing for $20 to $25 per square foot in a neighborhood that doesn't attract regional shopping traffic doesn't seem to make sense.

"Hobby businesses" are the bane of many small towns trying to revitalize their main streets, because of their irregular hours, lack of uniqueness and limited appeal. One never knows when "Grandma's Antiques" or "Patti Lou's Consignment Store" will be open, and just about every small town in Ohio seemed to be filled with the same types of businesses. How different can all the hundreds of antique and consignment stores be? At least in the breederhoods, the hobby businessess have regular hours, and they're unique.

I think the day spas, yoga studios and wellness centers can pull it off because they charge a fortune. Still, I've seen urban neighborhoods that have yoga studios everywhere, and I wonder how they all can survive?
 
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