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fog and flat

boiker

Cyburbian
Messages
3,890
Points
26
Coming into work today, I noticed how the fog emphasized the lack of anything, including topography in central illinois.
 

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JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
25,566
Points
59
Are you sure you did not cross the state into Indiana?
 

Seabishop

Cyburbian
Messages
3,838
Points
25
I'd love to see the plains/prarie firsthand especially after seeing central Illinois from the air. Any sprawl seems so much worse when new big boxes and subdivisions are plunked down in the flat expanse of farmland with no hills, forests, or even curves in the road to break it up.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
19,966
Points
49
The only thing missing is Michael Landon from Highway to Heven...

It was foggy this morning in SW Michigan as well...
 

BKM

Cyburbian
Messages
6,463
Points
29
I still remember the drive along US 24 from Fort Wayne to Peoria (Bradley University).

I'll have you know, JNA, that Indiana at least has stands of trees. :) Parts of Illinois are NOTHING but industrialized agriculture.

East and south of my current home-the Central Valley of California can be even spookier at times, though. THAT is industrialized agriculture.
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,374
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38
BKM said:
I'll have you know, JNA, that Indiana at least has stands of trees.
JNA and I know the scenic diversity of southern Indiana. Many would not believe the topography of the place. I have steep slope zoning districts! Who could imagine that in a "fly-over" state?

(If I weren't so damn technologically illiterate, I'd post images. Someday soon I'll figure it out.)
 

NHPlanner

A shadow of my former self
Staff member
Moderator
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9,927
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40
Exhibit #1 as to why I left the midwest to come back home to New England after college.
 

jordanb

Cyburbian
Messages
3,232
Points
25
Well, southern Indiania is in the foothills of the appalachians, so that makes sense. Southern Illinois is the same way. I honestly don't know why people would consider the prarie a "flyover zone" but the hill country not. I have a friend who used to live in Saskatchewan, but now she lives in a valley in the mountians, Somewhere in Ontario maybe?

Anyhow, her new town looks like it could be straight out of a romance novel---a little town nesseled next to a lake in a valley surrounded by snow-capped mountians. It's very picturesque, but she doesn't like it. She said that mountians on all sides make her feel claustrophobic, and that she felt much more connected to the world on the prarie.

I don't know how many people here have ever witnessed a big storm rolling across the prarie. It's really amazing. You can see it coming from miles away, see the clouds churning as it gets closer and closer, and see them light up with flashes of lightning, and the thunder rolling across the countryside. It's more breathtaking than any mountian. It's scary and awe-inspiring at the same time. Maybe storms on the ocean are the same, I've never seen one, but it's certanly more impressive than anything you'd ever see in hill country.
 

BKM

Cyburbian
Messages
6,463
Points
29
I don't know how many people here have ever witnessed a big storm rolling across the prarie. It's really amazing. You can see it coming from miles away, see the clouds churning as it gets closer and closer, and see them light up with flashes of lightning, and the thunder rolling across the countryside. It's more breathtaking than any mountian. It's scary and awe-inspiring at the same time. Maybe storms on the ocean are the same, I've never seen one, but it's certanly more impressive than anything you'd ever see in hill country.
Overall, West Coast weather is pretty wimpy, especially inland. But, your prairie storms rarely result in 18 foot waves crashing on the shore and houses sliding down the hillsides because of mud flows :)

I knew somebody in college whose family was from the Prairies (I think the really eerie Sand Hills of Nebraska). His family still felt strange in the east-claustrophobic.
 

JNL

Cyburbian
Messages
2,449
Points
25
Wow. I am surrounded by hills or mountain ranges in every direction. Even the harbour entry is hidden behind a hilly peninsula.

I heard a story, don't know if it's true, that an American planner was flown over here to do some consulting work for us, and he looked out the plane window and could not believe how so many houses are built on steep hillside slopes (some the only access is by cable car). Apparently he said 'Where is the flat land? I can't help you, I have no experience with this kind of terrain.' And promptly went home.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
13,689
Points
53
Holy flatland, Batman!

I commend you central Illinoisans. I could never live in a place like that. For me, the flatness isn't that bad, but the absolute lack of any tree cover is painful.
 

boiker

Cyburbian
Messages
3,890
Points
26
mendelman said:
Holy flatland, Batman!

I commend you central Illinoisans. I could never live in a place like that. For me, the flatness isn't that bad, but the absolute lack of any tree cover is painful.
don't get me wrong, we have trees here. clumps on farmsteads, around creeks and rivers and old strip mines. But otherwise..none or very, very few.
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
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28,240
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71
I just discovered that boiker sorta beat me to the 'most boring state' idea by several years.
 

Whose Yur Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
11,250
Points
38
I just discovered that boiker sorta beat me to the 'most boring state' idea by several years.
For it would have to be one of the Great Plains states; North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska or Kansas. The supposed Midwest states that really aren't.
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
14,625
Points
51
I like to rank Kansas as boring, but more because of the lack of interesting cities than the topography. It's basically rolling hills of wheat so at least the roads go up and down a little. Indiana sounds more of the flat boring state, but at least the have Indianapolis.
 

jsk1983

Cyburbian
Messages
2,469
Points
24
I like to rank Kansas as boring, but more because of the lack of interesting cities than the topography. It's basically rolling hills of wheat so at least the roads go up and down a little. Indiana sounds more of the flat boring state, but at least the have Indianapolis.
Indianapolis isn't too exciting for a city its size. Indiana at least has a little bit of coast line on Lake Michigan and the dunes.
 
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