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Forlorn Fruits

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
A recent breakfast got me thinking. Do some fruits seem to go with certain generations? Some fruits, like apples and strawberries, are like Chevys and Fords. They are everywhere and appeal to everyone. Then you have your Buicks.

Go into a restaurant and you are likely to get grape, strawberry, or mixed fruit jelly. My own refrigerator looks more like my grandmother's - apricot, elderberry and blueberry jams. My grandparent's generation was into all of the odd fruits, including things like currents, lingonberries and gooseberries as well as apricots and elderberry. It really is a shame that people don't eat these and they are so difficult to find in the store.

So are we seeing the last of these fruits, as they are replaced with trendy new ones like kiwis and starfruit? Or will the lowly elderberry once more rise to the top?
 

biscuit

Cyburbian
Messages
3,904
Points
25
My grandmother was making things like black currant jam, blueberry preserves, fig preserves, pear and other fruit spreads right up until her death last summer. I love the stuff and have several jars of the more "traditional fruit" in my fridge right now. I hope these aren't replaced with the more exotic fruits. Plus I can't imagine how kiwi jam would taste.

As a side note, you can get lingonberry based products at the food shop in IKEA.
 

SGB

Cyburbian
Messages
3,388
Points
26
Mike D. said:
old people eat figs and prunes. yuck!
SkeLeton said:
Blasphemy! Well if you don't like'em pass'em!(to me) :-}
Darnit, Skel! Don't hog 'em all. Pass 'em around to me, too!

One of my favorite Christmas traditions is receiving packets of figs and appricots in my stocking.
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
30
skel, you beat me to it, at least for the figs. I can't imagine someone with dentures eating really good, fresh turkish dates. (one more thing to buy this week in Toronto)

As for gooseberries, at the farm my parent's have a huge bush and always make jam and pies out of. The only problem with gooseberries is how sour they are.

On the odd fruit / jam thing, I love pickled pears, especially with french fries.

As for the elderberry, never had one, don't have a clue what they look or taste like.
 

El Feo

Cyburbian
Messages
674
Points
19
I remember picking paw-paws with my grandmother when I was a little kid. Does anybody even know what a paw-paw is now?

Note to our Kiwi and Aussie friends - I don't think a paw-paw is the same for you as it is for Americans from the southeast...
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,852
Points
39
OK, it's not a fruit, but how about red pepper jelly? My mom puts it on these little cracker appetizers she always makes for company. Ick. The old people seem to like it.

And my dad adored apple butter, but it never did a thing for me.
 

B'lieve

Cyburbian
Messages
219
Points
9
We have lots of wild paw-paw trees in the woods around my parent's house. But we also have lots of wildlife that loves paw-paws, so I've only seen a few flowers and never any of the fruits. Even the foxes eat them. We also have a lot of wild raspberry and blackberry bushes, some mulberry trees and a wild plum tree.

I had lingonberry preserves for the first time this summer. pretty good, a little tart and a little sweet.
 

nerudite

Cyburbian
Messages
6,544
Points
30
My favorite jams are blackberry and boysenberry. I think I'm the only one in my house that eats these though. Strawberry seems to be the most prevalent around here.

Fruit up here is hit and miss (at best) compared to what I grew up with. We had so many types of fruit growing in our backyard in Cali that I was used to the freshest of everything. In Alberta, I stick to apples, bananas, kiwis.... Plums and nectarines are good for like two weeks during the summer. I have given up on any citrus fruit here (even the mandarins imported around Christmas)... just too nasty.
 

moose

Member
Messages
109
Points
6
El Feo said:
Does anybody even know what a paw-paw is now?
I have no idea what one looks/tastes like, but I remember hearing them sing about it in the Jungle Book movie when I was a kid. Along with the Prickley Pear.
 

El Feo

Cyburbian
Messages
674
Points
19
They taste like a cross between a banana and a mango, they grow up and down the eaast coast and in the south, and they look like this:

 

JNL

Cyburbian
Messages
2,449
Points
25
Downtown said:
Do Kiwis eat Kiwis?
Yup Kiwis eat kiwifruit (I have some for lunch today) but not kiwi birds! Our national icon (the bird not the fruit) is an endangered species.

And no we don't each other, RichmondJake!! :p
 

JNL

Cyburbian
Messages
2,449
Points
25
El Feo said:

Note to our Kiwi and Aussie friends - I don't think a paw-paw is the same for you as it is for Americans from the southeast...
Do we have a different variety or something? Think I've only seen it dried.
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
25,565
Points
59
I like Apple Butter.
I like it on oatmeal in the morning.
I like it in evening on toast for dessert.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
Count me in as a fan of apple butter, or pear butter too.

Quince is another one I forgot. My Canadian grandmother always had quince candy.
 

nerudite

Cyburbian
Messages
6,544
Points
30
Cardinal said:
Quince is another one I forgot. My Canadian grandmother always had quince candy.
What does quince candy taste like? It doesn't sound appealing... but I've been wrong before. By the way, don't try the Canadian gum that tastes like soap... ick!
 

B'lieve

Cyburbian
Messages
219
Points
9
The paw-paws Down Under (and in tropical places) and in The Jungle Book are Papayas--a different thing, not even related to the paw-paws here (though ours have lots of tropical relatives--If there are any Latin Americans here besides Skel, custard apple or annona might sound familiar; I don't know if they have those all the way down in Chile.)
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
30
nerudite posted
By the way, don't try the Canadian gum that tastes like soap... ick!
You'll never get your citizenship unless you can blow a bubble using thrills.

 

jmf

Cyburbian
Messages
594
Points
17
Zoning Goddess said:
OK, it's not a fruit, but how about red pepper jelly? My mom puts it on these little cracker appetizers she always makes for company. Ick. The old people seem to like it.
A friend of my mom's gives us pepper jelly, put a few spoonfuls on a big piece of brie and pop it in the microwave for 30-45 secs - it is awesome - if you don't have pepper jelly marmalade works well too.
 
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