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Four types of dwellings

garethace

Cyburbian
Messages
137
Points
6
For the inner city of Dublin, Ireland.

Check out some of my better pics here: What I have tried to do is to contrast four distinctly different stages of housing and occupation of my own city in Ireland. Most of the cities here, do follow a similar pattern in the case of urbanisation for denser areas.

These old giants never found a proper use, except either as office space rental in the right location, or in the wrong locations became beautiful looking tenement squaller, health hasards and a place to throw the poorest classes who couldn't afford a suburban house. An apartment block for the nineteenth century.

http://www.cyburbia.org/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=4904&size=big&password=&sort=1&cat=508

http://www.cyburbia.org/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=4912&size=big&password=&sort=1&cat=508

http://www.cyburbia.org/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=4914&size=big&password=&sort=1&cat=508

Turn of the century, alot of Georgian was erased and replaced by practical dense urban development, but unfortunately no public transport etc was available:

http://www.cyburbia.org/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=4901&size=big&password=&sort=1&cat=508

http://www.cyburbia.org/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=4906&size=big&password=&sort=1&cat=508

http://www.cyburbia.org/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=4908&size=big&password=&sort=1&cat=508

http://www.cyburbia.org/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=4913&size=big&password=&sort=1&cat=508

Yuppy 1990s:

http://www.cyburbia.org/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=4902&size=big&password=&sort=1&cat=508

http://www.cyburbia.org/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=4907&size=big&password=&sort=1&cat=508

But i prefer the honestly modern stuff, to the fake oldie stuff:

http://www.cyburbia.org/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=4911&size=big&password=&sort=1&cat=508



Turn of the millenium, managing resources of space in the run-down urban cores better by moving people back in:

http://www.cyburbia.org/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=4903&size=big&password=&sort=1&cat=508

http://www.cyburbia.org/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=4910&size=big&password=&sort=1&cat=508
 
Last edited:

Wulf9

Member
Messages
923
Points
22
Thanks. That's a good way to start thinking about the future in relation to the past.
 

garethace

Cyburbian
Messages
137
Points
6
Good the hear you have enjoyed my little rant about Housing design in Ireland. Only today on the news, the government here has announced it is releasing some state owned land near the centre of town to built affordable apartment/community types of places for the many young people/professionals here in Ireland in Dublin city who are currently priced out of the market completely.

Only people below a certain income level will be qualify to buy i think - i.e. speculation market was rampant all through nineties, now things may change.
 

garethace

Cyburbian
Messages
137
Points
6
Just wondering, is half an acre considered big for a site, or small in certain parts of the USA. (That is 0.2 of a hectare for all the Europeans/metric people here like me) Here in this country, Ireland, in the countryside half an acre is the norm. I have just designed a small house for someone who wanted to live in the countryside. Having lived and designed many a couple of apartment buildings now for small thight sites in the centres of large cities here, i find the dimensions of this site huge. Most of the reason for using such a huge site is easy to understand - sewage disposal. Yet this way of dealing with a problem is responsible for the rows and rows of once-off bungalow designs, which have made our country roads so ugly now.

BTW, here are some of my Helsinki shots, dense but very, very nice. I had lunch in a beautiful but clean, well organised, community-type of restaurant on the ground floor of these apartments just looking out at the view.

http://www.cyburbia.org/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=5125&password=&sort=1&cat=500&page=1

http://www.cyburbia.org/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=5124&password=&sort=1&cat=500&page=1

http://www.cyburbia.org/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=5123&password=&sort=1&cat=500&page=1

http://www.cyburbia.org/forums/member.php?action=getinfo&userid=1472

More to come soon, when i finish off feeding the negs into the scanner. Don't i just love old style silver haloid photography! Some of these pics might look very blurry, since i am not used to the cold in those places! Nice city though Helsinki.
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
30
The standard for the province I live in is 4000 sq metres (metric acre).

The lot dimensions are a minimum of 54 m of frontage and 38 m of depth. I know it does not equal 4000 but this si how it works. lots go smaller 18 m if they have water and sewer.

Half acre and quarter acre lots still abound.
 

NHPlanner

Forums Administrator & Gallery Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
9,889
Points
38
Our lot sizes in my community are soils-based....depends on the capacity to handle an induvidual septic system.

Typically this results in about 1 acre being the average lot size here.
 

garethace

Cyburbian
Messages
137
Points
6
I can imagine that in a big vast space like America, where the car rules and people love to live apart from one another - sort of the way nice residences with an acre or two grow up around the verges of lakes here in this country (cutting off the lake totally from people too i might add). But i am talking about plots just on the edge of nicely sized towns, centres for rural populations in the Irish Countryside. Even still in this situation 1/2 acre plots abound. I think that a 1/4 acre site would make the edges of our little villages here in this country more like villages than sprawl. I love some of the low-cost terracing developments done by the authorities which can and do make pretty nice streetscapes in the longer run, and integrate old and young alike. Mind you i have never experienced living in that kind of situation so i might not like it as much then. However i have lived in cities.

The one metric acre site is really some 'moma' even in places like rural Ireland, the remoter places which still have large tracts of open space to utilise. I am not sure about this one, because coming from my architectural training, i would probably love to have a 5 acre site and perch a modern looking glass box with wooden decks 'sensitively' on the landscape with great views of the morning rising sun etc. I love to 'go to town' on the architectural ideas, enjoyment of space, interesting and diverse circulation, level changes, different heights of ceilings etc to really make the most from the location - but something tells me in this day and age, perhaps huge plots aren't right in every case.
 

BKM

Cyburbian
Messages
6,464
Points
29
Most of our new development is occurring on lots of 3500-8000 square feet. Except for the really high end "custom home" areas.

I live in a townhouse. Not ideal, but from a streetscape/smart growth (hate that term) perspective they make a nice compromise between single family homes and apartments.

(Just like I won't ride a bus if I can help it, I don't want to live in an apartment anymore) :)
 

Rem

Cyburbian
Messages
1,524
Points
23
garethace said:
Only people below a certain income level will be qualify to buy i think - i.e. speculation market was rampant all through nineties, now things may change.
How will anyone stop the low income purchasers becoming speculators themselves? I've often wondered about affordable housing when it is sold rather than leased. Is there some way (in Ireland) to bind subsequent purchasers?
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
30
I can imagine that in a big vast space like America
This is a bit disjointed and long, but it answers many questions/comments.

Just to clarify, i am in a very rural area in eastern canada, actually it is Irish Festival this weekend.

The one acre lot is used within City and Town limits and on the fringe of municipalities.

While the 1 acre lots seem to be sprawling, the size of the lot in itself does not contribute to sprawl too badly in our area it is provincial development policies that create sprawl (ie road maintenance and construction policies, subdivison regulations).

On teh health front, there area few areas in teh province on 1 acre lots that have bad water/no water and septic system problems due to soil conditions. i should have mentioned that the Health Dept can require larger lots or special septic systems based on soils and percolation tests.
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,624
Points
34
This might be getting off topic, but it builds on donk's comments. Around here we really dont think of sprawl by lot size, which sometimes hits 1 acre here. Rather, sprawl characteristics tend to be identified by service deficiencies (sewer, public water, lp gas instead of natural gas piped in, etc)

And rem, why stop low income speculators? If they can get a leg up in the system, good!
 

garethace

Cyburbian
Messages
137
Points
6
How will anyone stop the low income purchasers becoming speculators themselves? I've often wondered about affordable housing when it is sold rather than leased. Is there some way (in Ireland) to bind subsequent purchasers?
Well I visited the island of Malta once, and over there because of cronic land and sewage/water resource limits, it is impossible for someone to go out there and speculate anymore. It is impossible also for one Maltesse native to build two houses - one for him/herself and another to sell off to some rich tourist.

In parts of Ireland that are very scenic, like where all the nice links Golf courses are on the west side of the country - those places are FULL of summer-use only apartments and houses - which the locals cannot afford to buy, since the market is completely washed out with rich folks from the cities wanting to have summer vacation homes. Naturally the authorities and the local governments here, keen to facillitate very bad speculative development allowed this to go on and on and on.

You see with interest rates SO LOW here, noone in their right mind would just leave money sitting in a bank, diminishing while this 'strange kind of very expensive property boom tears away all around us'. What you are seeing now from a population/demographic analysis point of view in Ireland now, is the children of the first generation on 1970s generation, wanting to buy here and live/work in Ireland. Prior to the 1970s, most of the Irish population would have emigrated to the states, Aussie or big urban centres in Britian - Leeds, Manchester, London, Birmingham etc.

There new apartments built on government owned soil in the centre of the urban boom towns like Dublin (land like old army barracks etc, etc untouched for generations) is allowing young professionals, as much as improverished people the chance to buy/own anything. You are absolutely right however, renting of property has never taken off here in Ireland, even in cities - the idea of 'owning, or rather tying oneself down with a big morgage' to a semi-d in the suburbs is associated with being middle class - only the improverished supposedly 'rented'. This is the oposite in Europe, with dramatically lower percentages of property ownership.

In Ireland it is 80% house ownership! ! ! And people haven't YET got used the fact, this is unsustainable longer term. There is only so many miles that one can commute from, only so many traffic jambs that people can take! I was born, raised and brought up on a 73 acre plot myself, and we used cattle to mow the grass! In this country owning property is considered security - noone here in Ireland/Europe owns shares etc, its ALL in property. Whereas in the States alot of families have money tied up in their own personal stock portfolio. In Ireland, it was always to do with greed to grab a bigger and fancier house, and move up the 'enclusive property ladder'. Barf!

Here are some more Helsinki pics:

http://www.cyburbia.org/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=5137&password=&sort=1&cat=500&page=1

http://www.cyburbia.org/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=5136&password=&sort=1&cat=500&page=1

http://www.cyburbia.org/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=5135&password=&sort=1&cat=500&page=1

http://www.cyburbia.org/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=5134&password=&sort=1&cat=500&page=1

http://www.cyburbia.org/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=5133&password=&sort=1&cat=500&page=1

In Finland they have a very small population - i think something like less than 4 million people for the total size of the country. Yet because in Finland, most of the people live within a greater Helsinki area, the way they have organised train, bus and light rail transport to work efficiently and reliably together is exceptional. (Covering outer Helsinki areas, satalitte towns and inner city public tranpsort.

Here in this country, Ireland we haven't really grasped how important linking up together all our transport and public systems are. We have just tended to believe that soon every small single storey house on a half acre lot will have two cars or more on average. Is that really sustainable. I mean Ireland has a small manageable population of about 4 million people, spread out over a reasonably sized Island. We have 5/6 different airports, all of which are screaming for more expansions, more terminals...
 

garethace

Cyburbian
Messages
137
Points
6
Here is just a very quick run down of Imperial and Metric areas that i find very helpful - A quick mathematical 'proof' like the ones back in school times, if you like, which i like to read every once in a while to remember how both imperial and metric scales work. It just relates to calculating a very simple, easy house plot, which uses an extra 7.5 metres or rougly 22-23 feet, (a good 7 yards) to accomodate a percolation area from a dwelling house.

Imperial Yards and Acres
4,840 sq. yards in an acre

4,840 sq. yards divided by 2 = 2,420 sq. yards
= 1/2 acre.

(There are 3 feet in a yard, and there are 9 sq. feet in one sq. yard)

What normally passes for a 1/2 acre plot here
is 100 feet x 200 feet = 20,000 sq. feet.

100 feet / 3 x 200 feet / 3 = 2, 217 sq. yards

(Obviously this must be less than a 1/2 acre, since a half acre is 2,420 sq. yards)

Metric Hectares and Imperial Acres
2.471 acres in one hectare

One acre in 0.4 of a hectare

0.2 hectares = 1/2 acre.

Imperial to Metric
100 feet x 200 feet = 30 metres x 60 metres

= 1860 sq. metres

= 0.186 Hectares

because 100,000 metres squared = 1 full Hectare.

Therefore, 30 x 60.7 metres = 2025 sq. Metres

Or approximately = 0.2 hectares or 1/2 acre site plot.
 

garethace

Cyburbian
Messages
137
Points
6
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