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From the creators of http://welovetheiraqiinformationminister.com:

Duke Of Dystopia

Cyburbian
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2,713
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24
."I think this whole recall thing is ridiculous ... This is going to turn out to be nothing other than a popularity contest." - Former Minnesota Gov. Jesse Ventura.



GO AAHHNOLD!


[after Sylvester Stallone invited him to join an all-male club]"I told him it was the worst thing he could do. That we're living in a very sensitive time period, when women were struggling for equality. I said I didn't agree with half the stuff they were talking about, but a club like that would offend every smart woman in the country."

He must have some sense of the times



"As much as when you see a blonde with great **** and a great ass, you say to yourself, 'Hey, she must be stupid or must have nothing else to offer', which maybe is the case many times. But then again there is the one that is as smart as her breasts look, great as her face looks, beautiful as her whole body looks gorgeous, you know, so people are shocked."

The sensitive 90's kind of guy
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
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I wonder what Rem would think of this ...

 

Rem

Cyburbian
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Dan said:
I wonder what Rem would think of this ...
Sorry Dan - I wasn't being aloof, I just missed the question.

I admit, Arnie seems a pretty strange governor and it is going to be seen as a joke by a lot of people, but as far as actors becoming politicians goes, your career before politics shouldn't necessarily exclude you from nominating and being taken seriously (unless you have made lots of dumb movies (no offence people who have made dumb movies), have an accent (no offence people with accents) and walk like a girl because your muscles are too big) (no offence girls). The Australian media is reporting it along "Only in America" lines. However, I reckon if we elected our Governors, Arnie would be a strong chance in most Australian States too.

I have often heard the criticism that much of American politics is a popularity contest - the right smile, the right sound grab writers, the right positioning - and hence it is made for actors. This was one of the debating themes over here during the design of our Republican model. We ended up with a model that wasn't supported in a referundum because it did not provide for direct election of the President. The plan was to avoid expensive, popularity contest, election campaigns such as those in America. Instead in our republic model, the President was to be elected by Parliament (roughly the equivalent of your Congress). Hence we are still a constitutional monarchy (how embarrassing).

Australia doesn't have a history of actors/celebrities moving into politics, but we do have plenty of sportsmen and women who have entered politics upon retirement. Their popularity is no more or less a burden than actors/celebrities in America. Our nomination process within the parties is very different though - it is a small, behind closed doors, election that doesn't generate the sort of activity in the public arena your nomination run offs seem to. Having won a medal at the Olympic Games is no less useful in winning a nomination in our system than having shot and blown up a lot of towel heads in the movies, in the US.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
17,847
Points
59
Rem said:
Sorry Dan - I wasn't being aloof, I just missed the question.
I thought the "thumbs up" sign in Australia was considered the equivalent of giving someone the middle finger in the US. From Global Goof-Ups ...

Halfway around the world, an American couple on an auto tour in Australia was stopped by a policeman in Sydney for failing to signal before turning. Seeing that they were tourists, the officer gave them only a friendly warning. Relieved, the American man responded with a smile and the thumbs-up sign. The policeman became enraged, ordered the couple out of the car, called a backup, searched the car, and finally gave the driver an expensive ticket. Later, back in their hotel and recounting their experience, the tourists learned that in Australia the thumbs-up gesture means "screw you!"
 

Rem

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Urban myth number ........nnnn

When I was about 8 years old (over 30 years ago), a thumbs up in Australia meant "up your b*m". Today, a thumbs up means good, OK - a friendly sign. As the 102'nd state of the US, a middle finger is needed in Australia today to convey "please perform a sexual act on yourself, but also please conduct it in a manner that belittles you and conveys a relatively superior social position on me." Or, sr*ew you, for short.

I don't think a thumbs up ever meant scr*w you in Australia - but up your b*m was a seriuos insult back when we didn't acknowledge that fornication ocurred outside the farmyard (ie. 30+ years ago).

By the way, I was so wide of the mark in understanding your original question that if I went back to nerd school now, I would be the nerd of the nerd school. [idiot]explain the electoral system and Australian republic referendum in 50 words or less[/idiot]. Just bear with me.
 

Rem

Cyburbian
Messages
1,524
Points
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By the way, I think a thumbs up is a grave insult in Greek culture. Maybe in your story was about a policeman of Greek ancestry. There are many expatriate Greeks in Australia (yes I am clutching at straws here).
 
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