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Fun quiz: How do we talk?

nerudite

Cyburbian
Messages
6,544
Points
30
46% yankee... barely in to yankee territory. That was weird though, because some of the terms I used interchangeably.
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
26,006
Points
64
41% (Yankee). Barely into the Yankee category.
Must be from being so / too close to Kentucky :-\


If you do not answer any question
and go directly to click "Compute My Score"
the results are
100% (Dixie). Is General Lee your father?
 
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Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
"100% (Dixie). Is General Lee your father?"

Damn. I thought I was smarter than that. Do they think southern Canada is Dixie?
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,852
Points
39
83% Dixie. I am appalled (not being 100%), as you might guess, since I am one of the staunch defenders of the South on Cyburbia. ;-)

Must have to do with my deepest, darkest secret: my mom is (ack) a Yankee...
 

DA Monkey

Cyburbian
Messages
84
Points
4
58% Dixie

Really upsetting, cause Im much further south than you lot, so I figure I must be way past Dixie.

Nevertheless, since I was game (or bored enough) to try your lingo quiz, perhaps you should have a captain cook at some true blue slanging from the deep south.

Here tis

http://smartasses.org/aussiequiz.html
 

Rem

Cyburbian
Messages
1,523
Points
23
66% (Dixie). A definitive Southern score!

Hmmmm? I smell a rat - oops, that might be my dinner cooking. (Which adds further weight to the southernor argument. ;-))
 
Messages
7,649
Points
29
Rem said:
66% (Dixie). A definitive Southern score!

Hmmmm? I smell a rat - oops, that might be my dinner cooking. (Which adds further weight to the southernor argument. ;-))

lol. How much more Southern can you get? Last time I checked, about the only thing South of Oz was the South Pole. :-D ;-) :-0
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
26,006
Points
64
DA Monkey said:
Nevertheless, since I was game (or bored enough) to try your lingo quiz, perhaps you should have a captain cook at some true blue slanging from the deep south.

Here tis http://smartasses.org/aussiequiz.html

Here are my results of taking their quiz:
You got 5 answers right. Questions 2, 5, 16, 17, & 20
You got 15 answers wrong.
You're a proper mug!
Best advice is... stay at the Hilton, eat at McDonalds, do not, I repeat DO NOT venture into unpaved road territory.
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
30
Cardinal said:
"100% (Dixie). Is General Lee your father?"

Damn. I thought I was smarter than that. Do they think southern Canada is Dixie?


They must as my score was

65% (Dixie). A definitive Southern score!

Considering the farthest south I've ever been is Cape May, NJ it is odd.

However I do live on the northern fringe of the Appalachians, and people marrying cousins is common enough around here.
 

biscuit

Cyburbian
Messages
3,904
Points
25
90% Dixie :-D
I had no idea that General Lee was my Daddy. And to think my Mom has been lying to me all these years.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
14,146
Points
58
40% (Yankee). A definitive Yankee.

This is right, but they forget to ask how you pronounce "Roof" ;-)
 

DecaturHawk

Cyburbian
Messages
880
Points
22
44% Yankee. And this while still carrying the baggage of two years living in Texas and speaking Texican: "Shoot fire", "Shoot heck", "Finnin' to do my bidness", "Out of pocket", etc.

'Course, only during my three years in Wisconsin did I ever hear anyone use the term "make strange."
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,552
Points
42
57% Dixie. Like JNA my Jersey-ness is being watered down by proximity to Kaintuck'

The question about the night before Halloween was dead on "Exclusive to New York City and New Jersey" :-}
 

MD Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
2,612
Points
40
70% Dixie

About what I expected being raised 6 miles south of the Mason Dixon line. Does anybody else use the term "read up" (pronounced red) when referring to cleaning up your room or the dinner table?
 

Plannerbabs

Cyburbian
Messages
1,037
Points
23
38% (Yankee). A definitive Yankee.

Interesting, since I'm a midwestern girl, but I did spend most childhood summers in upstate NY, MA, and NH. Must have rubbed off on me.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
14,146
Points
58
Plannerbabs said:
38% (Yankee). A definitive Yankee...Interesting, since I'm a midwestern girl


Well, I grewup and still live in the Great Lakes area and I am 'Yankee', dialectically.

I think people are mis-interpreting the term 'Yankee' to mean only those of the north half of the eastern seaboard and east of Central Pennsylvania, which is wrong.

Didn't people from Michigan, Ohio, Wisconisn, etc fight against the South in the Civil War?

Yes, so we are Yankees and can surely have a 'Yankee' accent.

Sorry to wax academic.
 
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SkeLeton

Cyburbian
Messages
4,853
Points
26
mendelman said:
I think people are mis-interpreting the term 'Yankee' to mean only those of the north half of the eastern seaboard and east of Central Pennsylvania, which is wrong.
Heck... here (and at least all latin america) Yankee (phonetically changed here to Yanqui) = Person from the US...
Gringo, is also used here to reffer someone from the US, but you can also use it for anyone who speaks English and even German (beats me why).
 

Bangorian

Member
Messages
198
Points
7
39% Yank - surprising it wasn't better, since I grew up in Michigan, lived in NY State, and now reside in Maine.

Of course, they missed out on two big upper-midwestern accents: Da Yooper / Mina'soten accent (i.e. "Fargo") ya know. Darn tootin! :c:

Theother being the "melk" (what you drink), "pellow" (what you sleep on) et. al. accent, which seems to also include my all-time favorite un-word, "cousint". :5
 

SlaveToTheGrind

Cyburbian
Messages
1,492
Points
27
50% (Yankee). Barely into the Yankee category. Guess my northerns roots are getting a little shallow since I moved out of the midwest in 1992.
 

giff57

Corn Burning Fool
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
5,452
Points
34
Big Easy King said:
70% Dixie. Damn I'm southern, y'all! :-D


They did not have a choice for they way I address a group. When I made a choice it said that the midwest version was "you guys" ..so why not make it a choice, who writes these things anyway
 

biscuit

Cyburbian
Messages
3,904
Points
25
DA Monkey said:
Nevertheless, since I was game (or bored enough) to try your lingo quiz, perhaps you should have a captain cook at some true blue slanging from the deep south.

Here tis

http://smartasses.org/aussiequiz.html

You got 10 answers right.
You got 10 answers wrong.
You're a nong as far as the Strine goes.
...but there may be hope for you yet. After all, you nearly got half of them right... but a miss is as good as a mile in a quiz, innit?

well 50% isn't that bad is it? Someone will just have to explain what "nong as far as the Strine goes," means.
 

JNL

Cyburbian
Messages
2,449
Points
25
DA Monkey said:
Nevertheless, since I was game (or bored enough) to try your lingo quiz, perhaps you should have a captain cook at some true blue slanging from the deep south.

Here tis

http://smartasses.org/aussiequiz.html

My score...
--------
You got 17 answers right.
You got 3 answers wrong.
You'll be apples! Well... nearly anyway.
You will communicate fairly effectively with the native population, but they will still mutter "bloody yank" when you walk out of the pub.
-------
I can understand most strine but some of it's a bit foreign :)
 

DA Monkey

Cyburbian
Messages
84
Points
4
biscuit said:
well 50% isn't that bad is it? Someone will just have to explain what "nong as far as the Strine goes," means.


Nong is not as bad as being called a "dropkick" or a wombat however it is worse than being described as having "roos in you top paddock" and about the same as being described as "cant run a choko vine over a dunny"

However, takin the piss when it comes to lingo and yanks is a bit like slappin a wallaby with a gumboot.

;-) no offense intended - just a bit more aussie slang that seemed decently obscure)
 

nerudite

Cyburbian
Messages
6,544
Points
30
DA Monkey said:
58% Dixie

Nevertheless, since I was game (or bored enough) to try your lingo quiz, perhaps you should have a captain cook at some true blue slanging from the deep south.

Here tis

http://smartasses.org/aussiequiz.html

16 out of 20 right... but then, it's easier when you read the stuff. If someone was spouting off a long stream of those colloquialisms I'd be lost!
 

DA Monkey

Cyburbian
Messages
84
Points
4
Trail Nazi said:
Only 7 right. :( I guess I have to watch some more Australian films to catch up on the lingo.

To further develop jingoistic aussie strineability I would highly recommend you take a gander at the following movies "Fat Pizza", "Crackerjack", and "The Black Pudding" - animated version, all are real cracker flicks :b:
 

B'lieve

Cyburbian
Messages
222
Points
9
68% Dixie, no surprise there. I think the Southern quiz is just measuring your Dixie-ness: anything less than 50% is considered Yankee, and a score above 50% makes you Dixie.

My results from the Strine quiz, which completely surprised me...
----------
You got 15 answers right.
You got 5 answers wrong.
You'll be apples! Well... nearly anyway.
You will communicate fairly effectively with the native population, but they will still mutter "bloody yank" when you walk out of the pub.
----------

Mischief Night is not "exclusive to New York and New Jersey;" we have it down here, too.

I've heard of people saying 'redd up' instead of 'clean up', but I don't know anyone who uses it.
 

Rem

Cyburbian
Messages
1,523
Points
23
biscuit said:
Someone will just have to explain what "nong as far as the Strine goes," means.
In case you didn't follow DAMonkey's explanation, a nong in US English is a 'dumb@ss' and Strine is 'Australian' (most Australians tend to drop a few vowels as a youngster then as they get older the consonants start falling away too).
 

DA Monkey

Cyburbian
Messages
84
Points
4
Rem said:
In case you didn't follow DAMonkey's explanation, a nong in US English is a 'dumb@ss' and Strine is 'Australian' (most Australians tend to drop a few vowels as a youngster then as they get older the consonants start falling away too).


Aww Rem, you take all the fun out of being an aussie :-D
 

Rem

Cyburbian
Messages
1,523
Points
23
Originally posted by DA Monkey
Aww Rem, you take all the fun out of being an aussie.
I think we need to make Australian culture as accessible as possible to the running dog US capitalist cultural imperialists so as to simplify out post invasion rule of their country.

Am I using this PM function properly? Ooops. :-E
 
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