Vehicles / bikes 🏍 Gas shortage???

michaelskis

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The Colonial Pipeline was shut down due to a cyber attack. The result that the cyberterrorists wanted is becoming reality. There is panic and lines at the pumps have become reality and prices above $3.00 a gallon are there until the tanks run dry. At some local stations, that has already happened.

Personally, we are going to be making less trips in the car for the next week or so. What are your thoughts. Has the run on gas and the potential shortage effected your driving habits?
 

Hink

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The prices are going up (as they have for the past 6+ months), but I have seen nothing local about long lines or fear.
 

Maister

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Someone else posted it on another thread, but I'll paraphrase my agreement. My cars run on gasoline. I will purchase gasoline at the price it's being sold so long as I need to use my cars to drive. When/if the price becomes too high to justify the expense, I'll likely respond by engaging in more conservation efforts.
 
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michaelskis

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The prices are going up (as they have for the past 6+ months), but I have seen nothing local about long lines or fear.
This is what it is like down here...



Personally, I filled up on Sunday because I needed gas. I have no idea where the wife's car is on fuel. They say things "should" be back to normal by this weekend.
 

kms

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My car uses gas. I drive places sometimes, so I'll buy gas. My tank was close to E last night so I went to the filling station and filled the tank.

I have to go to KY later this week. Hopefully I'll be able to buy enough gas to get home.

PA gas is always high. I'll fill up in Ohio before I cross into WV.
 

Faust_Motel

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Nah. I go through about a tank every two weeks and less now that Its getting warmer and I'm biking more. My old boss had the gasbuddy app and was obsessed with saving a nickel here or there by going to the cheapest place. I just don't use enough to care, personally what it costs. I'm interested in the bigger implications for logistics companies etc, though.

Price elasticity of demand, how does it work?
 

MD Planner

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There were a couple of stations around here that ran out of gas over the weekend. But this is really a frenzy being whipped up by the traditional and social media. It's not that big of a deal. Yet. And unlike toilet paper people can't really hoard gas nearly to that extent.
 

kms

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There were a couple of stations around here that ran out of gas over the weekend. But this is really a frenzy being whipped up by the traditional and social media. It's not that big of a deal. Yet. And unlike toilet paper people can't really hoard gas nearly to that extent.
I believe that people will hoard cans of gas at home. Not smart, but some will.
 

MD Planner

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Yeah, but how much can people realistically hoard? I just think it will be a short run. There are options for other fuel delivery.
 
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mendelman

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Gas prices are typically unimportant to me as my daily round trip 'commute' is 3 miles and longer trips are maybe once/twice a week, as our boys, thankfully, are not in sports.
 

Hink

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All the reports I read last night made it come across that this is a very short, temporary transportation issue, not supply issue. So it will be resolved in a couple days, by sending more gas trucks to the SE United States and all these people will have more gas than they need, that they bought at a much higher price than it is worth.

This is really affecting anyone outside of the Carolinas/Georgia/Florida area as that pipeline primarily served those areas. That is likely why I didn't have a clue what gas shortage we were talking about...
 

MD Planner

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Yep. People get from 0-60 so quickly. I actually do blame the "media" in part for ginning up a problem that isn't nearly as severe as it is. We've seen a run here and some stations are out. Which is funny because our gas around here primarily comes out of the Savannah port and not the pipeline.
 

Maister

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This sucks because I was going to fill up the tank last week but thought 'nah, I'll wait till after payday.' The delay will probably cost me in the neighborhood of $6 [/1stworldproblems]
 

Salmissra

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Hubby falls into the "there might be a shortage here too!" category, so he gassed up this morning, even though he had a 1/2 tank. Complained about the price.

On my way home from the way-out suburbs last night I looked at my gas indicator and realized I would need to gas up in the next couple of days. I went ahead and did it today. That should hold me for about 3 weeks.
 

mendelman

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I remember being in Chicagoland in 2004 when gas kept creeping up to $2.00/gal and the country was ready to devolve into anarchy, many were preparing for the Rapture and/or ready to commit hari kari.

I had a 60 mile round trip commute at the time through easily 40 miles of consistent stop and go traffic and I simply shrugged and didn't complain as my demand was inelastic. Therefore not worth the mental anguish.
 
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michaelskis

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[Sarcasm]
Day 3. I was surprised by the sun coming up today. I received word that there is a tanker truck 200 miles away and it might be coming this way at some point. Not holding out for much hope. Started distilling my own fuel out of bio-waste and corn. If this does not work, I acquired a book on how to convert my vehicle to steam power. I need to go out hunting now. Without fuel, getting to the grocery store is impossible. While scouting areas the other day, I saw a few squirrels in the meadow. I should be able to get one of them today. [/Sarcasm]

The issue is people panicked and the reason there is no gas at the stations is because there was a run on it. Local stations are still getting gas trucks and the fuel is still flowing. But the problems come about because there are people who need to get gas to get places, and most of the stations in my area of the county are sold out at the moment. I should be able to get through the rest of the week without fueling up, but I have staff that needs gas today if they are going to come into work tomorrow.
 

michaelskis

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Well, this is starting to suck. I have one staff person who does not have enough gas to get to work this morning, and all the gas stations in reasonable proximity to their apartment is completely out of gas.

Fights are also breaking out for those waiting in line for gas.

The pipeline is back in full operation, but the gas travels at 5 miles per hour so in some places there is no gas at the distribution centers. Locally, we have gas trucks delivering gas, but the panic caused by the media resulted in gas stations running out not due to a lack of supply, but excessive demand. The wife and I have enough gas to last us through the weekend and it sounds like all stations will be back up and running by the time we run out.
 

Maister

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On a semi-related note, one practice I have taken to and will continue even post-COVID is to maintain higher inventories of critical items at home when shopping. Toilet paper and paper towels are once again available on store shelves regularly, but I like the idea of going shopping fewer times and purchasing/keeping greater quantities of items on hand. It actually saves money.
 

mendelman

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On a semi-related note, one practice I have taken to and will continue even post-COVID is to maintain higher inventories of critical items at home when shopping. Toilet paper and paper towels are once again available on store shelves regularly, but I like the idea of going shopping fewer times and purchasing/keeping greater quantities of items on hand. It actually saves money.
Espeically for stuff like this that takes a long time to go bad.
 

Bubba

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On a semi-related note, one practice I have taken to and will continue even post-COVID is to maintain higher inventories of critical items at home when shopping. Toilet paper and paper towels are once again available on store shelves regularly, but I like the idea of going shopping fewer times and purchasing/keeping greater quantities of items on hand. It actually saves money.

Maister at home:


hoard2.jpg
 

Maister

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Espeically for stuff like this that takes a long time to go bad.
And for things that tend to go bad quickly, like produce, I'm planting more veggies in the garden and baking more bread.

1620914149461.png

Chez Maister
 

SlaveToTheGrind

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Out west yesterday, paid $3.079/10 at Costco. I wish law would be passed outlawing using 9/10 of a penny on gas prices. I certainly cannot pay you 9/10 of a cent nor can you give me change in the amount of 9/10.
 

WSU MUP Student

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On a semi-related note, one practice I have taken to and will continue even post-COVID is to maintain higher inventories of critical items at home when shopping. Toilet paper and paper towels are once again available on store shelves regularly, but I like the idea of going shopping fewer times and purchasing/keeping greater quantities of items on hand. It actually saves money.

I've always bought napkins, paper towels, and toilet paper in bulk and I remember back in the fall and winter before the pandemic my wife finally told me to stop buying the stuff because we were running out of space to store them. I slowed down but would still buy cases when they hit certain prices (thank you Amazon pricing algorithms!) and then the pandemic hit and TP-hoarding became a thing. Who's laughing now?
 

Maister

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I've always bought napkins, paper towels, and toilet paper in bulk and I remember back in the fall and winter before the pandemic my wife finally told me to stop buying the stuff because we were running out of space to store them. I slowed down but would still buy cases when they hit certain prices (thank you Amazon pricing algorithms!) and then the pandemic hit and TP-hoarding became a thing. Who's laughing now?
We didn't panic buy paper products when shortages began, but each time we shopped we tried to get about 50% more than we might otherwise when quantities were available. Sort of 'flattening the curve' in terms of supply.
 

MD Planner

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I typically fill up my tank when the needle moves below half. It just gives me a certain comfort knowing I've got enough fuel to get out of the immediate area if I have to. One of my dad's sayings was "it doesn't cost anymore to run it full than it does to run it empty". I also remember when he took me out driving the day I got my permit. I've been driving for like 10 minutes and he gets me out on I-70. We go a few miles and see that the eastbound lanes are stopped and there is a huge backup. And he says to me "I bet you at least 25% of those cars are worried about running out of gas. Don't be one of them". Right or wrong that stuck with me.
 

michaelskis

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No lines. Stations open. Pumps flowing.
Our State still has more than 50% of stations running dry. I waited 10 minutes yesterday to fill up my truck. Two hours later the station was out of gas.

I was going to mow the lawn and pressure wash the house this weekend, but the van was empty and I am not about to be “that guy” with a can during a run on gas.
 

Dan

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I went into the pipeline closure with a half tank of gas. I'm still counting weeks per tank rather than miles per gallon thanks to the pandemic. (Work is only about 5 miles/8 km away, and I go in 3 days a week.) Now, I probably have 3/8ths of a tank. Haven't seen any long lines for gasoline here, but prices are now up to about $3/gallon (79 cents/liter).

I'm more concerned about the chip shortage.
 

WSU MUP Student

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I went into the pipeline closure with a half tank of gas. I'm still counting weeks per tank rather than miles per gallon thanks to the pandemic. (Work is only about 5 miles/8 km away, and I go in 3 days a week.) Now, I probably have 3/8ths of a tank. Haven't seen any long lines for gasoline here, but prices are now up to about $3/gallon (79 cents/liter).

I'm more concerned about the chip shortage.

I'm concerned about the chip shortage as well. Yes, its affecting the local auto industry but I'm concerned because it's putting a damper on my desire to get a new Bronco!
 

Salmissra

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Drove to Houston area and back this weekend. It was a very wet drive home - rain most of the way, some of it severe.

At the Buc-ees closest to Houston, you would think there's a shortage. Lines at the pumps and people unable to even get into the parking lot so they're blocking the turn lane off the interstate.

At the Buc-ees closer to Dallas, no issues. Easy in and out, no lines, and normal traffic.

Good thing I drive a hybrid.
 
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