• Cyburbia is a fun, friendly, big tent, where we share our experiences and thoughts about urban planning practice, planning adjacent topics, and whatever else comes to mind. No ads, no spam, no echo chambers. Create your FREE Cyburbia ID, and join us today! Register through your Reddit, Facebook, Google, Twitter, or Microsoft account, or use your email address.

Generations

jestes

Cyburbian
Messages
230
Points
9
I recently attended a conference hosted by the Mississippi DOT. One of the professional development workshops was on team building across generational lines. This made me curious about the generations represented in Cyburbia.

From some of the posts, I have drawn the conclusion that at least two or three generations are represented here. This brings me to my question: How are are all of you? I understand that people tend to be reluctant in answering this question so if you don't want to come right out and say, at least tell us what year you graduated from high school. ;)

The four generations discussed in the session include:

The War Generation - 1922-1943
The Baby Boomers - 1943-1960
Generation X (Gen Xers) - 1960-1980
Generation Y (Nexters) - 1980-2000

As for me, I graduated in 1985 and I am 35 years old. This puts me squarely in Gen X.
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
30
Received my OSSD 1989 then my OCA diploma in 1990, Started university in 91. Clearly in the GenX group.

Thinking of Gen X, if anyone is looking for an interesting read check out Douglas Coupland's City of Glass. it his interpretation of people, places and activities that occur in Vancouver. Nice photos, neat descriptions. It is the prequel to Souvenirs of Canada.

I preferred Shampoo Planet and Micro Serfs over Generation X, but I guess the title's were not as condusive to labelling a group.
 
Messages
3,690
Points
27
Gen X-er. Graduated highschool in 1993. Now, a bigger question is which was the bigger Gen X movie: Singles or Reality Bites?
 
Messages
5,353
Points
31
I graduated high school in '90, which puts me in that horrid "Generation X" category. I never cared for the term because those who coined the label tried to label us as aimless, apathetic, complaining slackers with no real goals or motives in life.
 

statler

Cyburbian
Messages
447
Points
14
Born '74
High School '92
College '96

Right on track. I'm a little late on the whole marriage/kids thing but I'm ok with that. :)
 

BKM

Cyburbian
Messages
6,464
Points
29
Very Early Generation X (Born 63, High School 82, Planning Degree in '89)

I always thought I was supposed to be a baby boomer, but since I can't identify at all with that generation, I like your definition better :)
 
Messages
5,353
Points
31
statler said:
Born '74
High School '92
College '96

Right on track. I'm a little late on the whole marriage/kids thing but I'm ok with that. :)
A little late??? I'm so far off that track.....I'll probably be pushing 40 before I even THINK of marrying anyone, much less having a child.
 

statler

Cyburbian
Messages
447
Points
14
Planderella said:


A little late??? I'm so far off that track.....I'll probably be pushing 40 before I even THINK of marrying anyone, much less having a child.
Lucky you. :)
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,984
Points
29
I don't claim to be either a Baby Boomer or Gen X’er even though some claim 1963 in both categories. I'm a Reagan 80's product. Post-Baby Boom and Pre-Whiney Assed Gen -X. We grew up thinking some adults were really stupid based upon their highly lame 60's and 70's stories. We were not going to follow the path of self indulgence and lame peacenik rationalizations. I'm also a product of the Cold War. As a military brat and a serviceman myself, in the pre-glasnost era, I have a hard time relating to those left of center. I have seen the evils of socialism up close.

Alex P. Keaton and Reagan were my heroes then. We had a mission then. Defeat the Commies and keep the economy churning. It’s good to have a mission.
 

jestes

Cyburbian
Messages
230
Points
9
Planderella said:
I graduated high school in '90, which puts me in that horrid "Generation X" category. I never cared for the term because those who coined the label tried to label us as aimless, apathetic, complaining slackers with no real goals or motives in life.
I thought the same thing about the Gen X label. However, here are the Gen X characteristics that were shared at the above mentioned seminar:

Born: 1960-1980:
After the blush of the Baby Boom, came of age deep in the shadow of the Boomers and the rise of the Asian tiger, represent the most diverse generation in U.S. history, including the highest percentage of naturalized U.S. citizens.

Defining Events and Trends:
Watergate, latchkey kids, single parents, MTV, AIDS, computers, the Challenger, fall of the Berlin Wall, Glasnost, Wall Street frenzy.

Core Values:
Diversity, thinking globall, balance, technoliteracy, fun, informality, self-reliance, pragmatism.

Personality:
Risk-takers, skeptical, family oriented, focused on job versus work hours.

What Motivates Them:
Few rules and minimum structure; leading edge technology; multiple assignments wtih little supervision; training and self-development; constructive feedback from a supervisor they like and respect; freedom and flexibility.
 

nerudite

Cyburbian
Messages
6,544
Points
30
Gen X and proud of it...

Born 1970, graduated hs 1987, graduated univ. 1990.

Right smack in the middle of GenX.
 

plannerkat

Cyburbian
Messages
204
Points
9
Similar to Statler & Seabishop:

Born in 74, HS Class of 92, BA in 95, Planning degree in 99. Starting to realize that I am a "real" adult -yikes!- but it'll be a few more years before we start spawning.
 

Seabishop

Cyburbian
Messages
3,838
Points
25
Just to clarify, I'm a cynical ironic GenXer because of the stats, not becuase they're like Statler's in particular. Class of 92 Rules!

I suggest a rumble in the parking lot between the GenXers and the Baby Boomers in parking lot at 3:00.
 

Jeff

Cyburbian
Messages
4,161
Points
27
27.... Classes of 1993 & 1997

Parris Island, SC Class of August ' 96
 

statler

Cyburbian
Messages
447
Points
14
Ya know what weird? I work in an office with <50 people in it and there are seven '74 babies (as we call ourselves). This seems like a statistical abnormalty. I can't find any real stats but it seems quite high as compared to general population.
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,984
Points
29
plannerkat said:
Similar to Statler & Seabishop:

Born in 74, HS Class of 92, BA in 95, Planning degree in 99. Starting to realize that I am a "real" adult -yikes!- but it'll be a few more years before we start spawning.
I came to the realization I was an adult when I stopped shopping for self-assembly press board furniture and I realized I owned an entire set of appliances. Well, that and the mortgage.
 
Messages
3,690
Points
27
Furniture also defined my adulthood for me - for some reason, buying new furniture from a furniture store was a much bigger deal than buying a house. Perhaps because until we bought the furniture, we'd been lounging on college era bought at the salvation army dog puked on and chewed up furniture and the new furniture and the new couches and chairs and tables made our house seem all brand new because we were loathe to lay on the old stuff.
 

NHPlanner

Forums Administrator & Gallery Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
9,878
Points
38
Another X'er

Born 1973
HS: 1992
BS & BUPD: 1997
Married: 2002
 

Repo Man

Cyburbian
Messages
2,550
Points
25
Born 1973
HS 1991
College 1995
Grad School 2000

I would fall into the Generation X category, but I don't like that label. It implies that all Gen Xers are jaded adults with no direction in life, wandering around complaining about everything and doing nothing. I just don't like the connotations associated with that label.
 

plannerkat

Cyburbian
Messages
204
Points
9
The mortgage and getting married (both in the past 3 months) have caused a great deal of "holy shit I'm a grown-up" panic as of late. We're slowly getting 'better' furniture, now if only we can replace the washing machine rescued from the curb...We've had it for 2 years and it still works!
 

Tranplanner

maudit anglais
Messages
7,903
Points
35
HS: '91
Uni: '96 (woulda been '95, but I had the co-op option)
Marriage: 2002

I've never considered myself a Gen Xer, more of a Gen "Yer", for lack of a better term. It always seemed to me that I was just a bit behind the Gen X curve...
 

statler

Cyburbian
Messages
447
Points
14
Tranplanner said:
HS: '91
Uni: '96 (woulda been '95, but I had the co-op option)
Marriage: 2002

I've never considered myself a Gen Xer, more of a Gen "Yer", for lack of a better term. It always seemed to me that I was just a bit behind the Gen X curve...
Yeah, well you Canadians are usually are few years behind us Yanks anyway! ;)
 

jmf

Cyburbian
Messages
594
Points
17
Born 1971
HS 1989
College 1993
Grad School 1995
Married 2001

I grew up in a "you started, you better finish, ON TIME" home. GenX time line but refused to bow to the hype. My father used to say I was the only person he knew who went to Newfoundland and Cape Breton (highest unemployent rates in Canada, at the time) for a job and got one. I guess it was a combination of stubborness, working the system and luck.

The marriage came a little later, although the husband to be arrived in the picture in 1993. We played the geography game for a while.

Newfoundland......Labrador (6 months)
Newfoundland......Cape Breton (1 year)
Annapolis Valley.....Cape Breton (1 1/2 years)
and then finally in the same place
 

NHPlanner

Forums Administrator & Gallery Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
9,878
Points
38
KMateja said:
Gen X-er. Graduated highschool in 1993. Now, a bigger question is which was the bigger Gen X movie: Singles or Reality Bites?
Signles if only for the simple fact that there was a quasi-planner in the movie. Plus the soundtrack was WAY better than the one for Reality Bites. :)
 

Habanero

Cyburbian
Messages
3,241
Points
27
JNL said:


Same here TexasPlanner. We just scrape in as Gen-Xers.
yeah, I only joke that I remember seeing Star Wars in the movie theater- I don't even think I was alive then.. ha ha ha. :)
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
Born 1966
High School 1984
College too many times to count

I am an X'er, and damn proud of it! Now all you slow, old Boomers either catch up or get out of the way!
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
17,677
Points
57
Generation X (Gen Xers) - 1960-1980
Seems a bit off ... I usually see the Baby Boomer designation applied to those with birth dates as late as 1964 and 1965.

There's also a rift in Gen-Xers ... the "Ataris" and "Nintendos." Atari Xers were born between 1965 and 1972; Nintendo Xers between 1973 and 1980. I'm an Atari Xer -- graduated from high school in 1984, BURP in 1989, MUP in 1996.

Generation Y can also be split up between "Extremes" and "Keens."
 

statler

Cyburbian
Messages
447
Points
14
Dan said:


Seems a bit off ... I usually see the Baby Boomer designation applied to those with birth dates as late as 1964 and 1965.

There's also a rift in Gen-Xers ... the "Ataris" and "Nintendos." Atari Xers were born between 1965 and 1972; Nintendo Xers between 1973 and 1980. I'm an Atari Xer -- graduated from high school in 1984, BURP in 1989, MUP in 1996.

Generation Y can also be split up between "Extremes" and "Keens."
I can see your point Dan, but I've never owned a Nintendo, yet I have very fond memories of my Atari 2400. But you're right, if I polled most of my friends in my age group they probably have logged a lot more hours on thier Nintendo's than thier Atari's. Maybe my folks were just too cheap to buy me a Nintendo. *shrug*
 

Runner

Cyburbian
Messages
566
Points
17
I agree that the Baby Boomers go to at least '63 maybe '64. Which makes me a Boomer.

Mike DeVuono said:
Parris Island, SC Class of August ' 96
HS: 1980
Parris Island: Plt 2029 (24 July 1981)
College: 1985
Married: 1987
 

Journeymouse

Cyburbian
Messages
443
Points
13
Does this mean I'm the first Gen-Yer to speak up? Wow.
b. 1980, GCSEs 1996, A-Levels 1998, BSc 2001 and hopefully an EngD 2005. My three sisters are all Gen-Xers by this definition (1967, 1970,1976). And my dad's a War-Gener (1938) and my mum a Boomer (1948).

However, I'd imagine there's a few differences in the British version. For a start it tends to be the British nature to be cynical and ironic regardless of generation. Then the war rationing continued until the '50s, so there wasn't much boom for my mum to be born in.
 

statler

Cyburbian
Messages
447
Points
14
Journeymouse said:
Does this mean I'm the first Gen-Yer to speak up? Wow.
b. 1980, GCSEs 1996, A-Levels 1998, BSc 2001 and hopefully an EngD 2005. My three sisters are all Gen-Xers by this definition (1967, 1970,1976). And my dad's a War-Gener (1938) and my mum a Boomer (1948).

However, I'd imagine there's a few differences in the British version. For a start it tends to be the British nature to be cynical and ironic regardless of generation. Then the war rationing continued until the '50s, so there wasn't much boom for my mum to be born in.
You bring up an interesting point Journymouse. You sort of answered my question but I'll ask it any way. How are the British generations split up? Do you even speak in terms of generations (boomer, X, Y) or is that just an American marketing thing? Also was there any kind of a post war boom in England? Was there any kind of population change?
 

gkmo62u

Cyburbian
Messages
1,046
Points
24
Early X' er

b 67
hs 85
ba 89
ma 95

Large distance between lates 60's and later 70's Xer's
 

plannerkat

Cyburbian
Messages
204
Points
9
Dan said:


Seems a bit off ... I usually see the Baby Boomer designation applied to those with birth dates as late as 1964 and 1965.

There's also a rift in Gen-Xers ... the "Ataris" and "Nintendos." Atari Xers were born between 1965 and 1972; Nintendo Xers between 1973 and 1980. I'm an Atari Xer -- graduated from high school in 1984, BURP in 1989, MUP in 1996.

Generation Y can also be split up between "Extremes" and "Keens."
My husband and I are the proud owners of an Atari system, "wood" paneled, as well as some of the choice games. I love explaining pre-3-D graphics video games to my 16 year old brother!
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,624
Points
34
Born in '68 graduated HS in '86 and college in '90. It's odd, but my sister is only 3 years older, and she's a "boomer" and I'm an "X'er"...
 

Journeymouse

Cyburbian
Messages
443
Points
13
statler said:
How are the British generations split up? Do you even speak in terms of generations (boomer, X, Y) or is that just an American marketing thing? Also was there any kind of a post war boom in England? Was there any kind of population change?
Bearing in mind that I'm doing this off the top of my head and haven't looked it up, I'd have to say it goes something like this:
  • The 'Waste-Not-Want-Nots' - 1914-1935: I've no idea what the official term would be, but basically optimistic, they'd seen the worst and a golden age was coming. Most people of this generation remain relatively optimistic. The basic attitude was the rising to adversity displayed in WWII, when they were young(ish) adults.
  • The War/Rationed Generation - 1935-1950: Due to the rationing (which continued to the mid '50s) the waste not, want not attitude continued somewhat but the basic attitude is that of the sixties and seventies.
  • The Baby Boomers - 1950-1970: There was a population (birth rate) boom following the end of the wars, but it wasn't really noticable at first due to rationing. This children grew up to start the 80's/'gimme' attitude.
  • Gen-X - 1965-1985: This is the cynicism and backlash against the eighties/boomers. The generation that wishes they could have more but knows that someone else has to suffer. And who wouldn't trust the Government as far as they could throw it but, after all, someone has to do it and rather them than us. These people are responsible for punk and indie music and all that kinda stuff. There is an overlap as the 'gimme' sentiment has never really gone away. On the otherhand, neither has the cynicism.
  • The Gimme Generation (Mk II) - 1980-?: Basically, the Gen-Xers grew up and decided to give their children everything they could because children are so wonderful. Possibly leading to the cult of the individual and all the selfish stuff. However, this generation has also been taught that they can be anything that they want to be and has a very independent mind-set.

I suppose I'm technically a Gimme, but I'm not one that's especially interested in material goods. I'm more interested in pursuing knowledge. Except when the material good in question is metallic and/or shiny and makes a good toy...
 
Top