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Schools: USA 🇺🇸 Graduate/PhD 2019-2020 applications and acceptance notices: United States

Dan

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As with previous years, this is a catchall thread for general discussion about what schools you applied to, where you got accepted, and ... whatever. :) :usa:
 
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Seems pretty quiet here...I'll bite. Here's my stats:

Undergrad school: University of Central Florida
Major: Public Administration & Urban Planning
GPA: 3.43 cGPA, 3.90 major GPA
GRE: 154V, 155Q, 5AW
Experience: 1.5 yrs working in a city with >50K population as an Associate Urban Planner

Applying to:

University of Florida
Florida State U.
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
University of Oregon

Any other schools that I should apply to if I have an interest in transportation planning for developing countries? Also, are my GRE scores a bit low? Should I retake it?
 

glutton

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Seems pretty quiet here...I'll bite. Here's my stats:

Undergrad school: University of Central Florida
Major: Public Administration & Urban Planning
GPA: 3.43 cGPA, 3.90 major GPA
GRE: 154V, 155Q, 5AW
Experience: 1.5 yrs working in a city with >50K population as an Associate Urban Planner

Applying to:

University of Florida
Florida State U.
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
University of Oregon

Any other schools that I should apply to if I have an interest in transportation planning for developing countries? Also, are my GRE scores a bit low? Should I retake it?
@trainfanaccount : For international planning/planning in developing countries, you'll want to apply to schools where alumni end up working in DC since that's where all the international NGOs and agencies are. That, or schools with a strong Peace Corps/Fulbright/FLAS connection. The school I went to, Cornell, had a strong international curriculum, had lots of international students in the cohort, offers a ton of random foreign languages, and has a large contingent of alum in DC and abroad (mostly the international students for abroad). There's also a high FLAS and Fulbright success rate, as well as some neat international offerings like the traveling Mellon workshop, and an international planning workshop in Indonesia, India, etc. Focus is mostly on Asia, not so much Latin America. There's also potential to do a semester abroad in Rome if you're interested in international food security/policy, although it's not that highly utilized since it's very specific. For what it's worth, I had very similar stats to yours (I don't think you need to retake), so I highly recommend looking into Cornell's MRP program!

For a smaller program, I'd look into Iowa State. The department head of the CRP program is from Ghana and he teaches all the international planning classes and conducts a lot of research on planning in developing countries. The program also has a strong affiliation to the graduate program in sustainable agriculture and global resource systems, so lots of students opt for a dual degree in sustainable ag. Plus, the World Food Prize is nearby in Des Moines, so people intern there.

Hope that helps and all the best!
 
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@trainfanaccount : For international planning/planning in developing countries, you'll want to apply to schools where alumni end up working in DC since that's where all the international NGOs and agencies are. That, or schools with a strong Peace Corps/Fulbright/FLAS connection. The school I went to, Cornell, had a strong international curriculum, had lots of international students in the cohort, offers a ton of random foreign languages, and has a large contingent of alum in DC and abroad (mostly the international students for abroad). There's also a high FLAS and Fulbright success rate, as well as some neat international offerings like the traveling Mellon workshop, and an international planning workshop in Indonesia, India, etc. Focus is mostly on Asia, not so much Latin America. There's also potential to do a semester abroad in Rome if you're interested in international food security/policy, although it's not that highly utilized since it's very specific. For what it's worth, I had very similar stats to yours (I don't think you need to retake), so I highly recommend looking into Cornell's MRP program!

For a smaller program, I'd look into Iowa State. The department head of the CRP program is from Ghana and he teaches all the international planning classes and conducts a lot of research on planning in developing countries. The program also has a strong affiliation to the graduate program in sustainable agriculture and global resource systems, so lots of students opt for a dual degree in sustainable ag. Plus, the World Food Prize is nearby in Des Moines, so people intern there.

Hope that helps and all the best!
@glutton : Thanks for the awesome info! I definitely feel like I don't have the credentials to get into Cornell tbh. My first two years of undergrad were rough (sub 3.0 gpa) and several withdrawals. I figured if I shot for something realistic, I would have a chance at funding. Did Cornell offer a decent funding package?

I actually switched Univ. of Oregon for Ohio State and added Univ. of Illinois at Chicago which seems to have a decent amount of international students. I'm kind of playing my cards right because I want to get into as little debt as possible. Thanks again!
 
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