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Guess the City 128

DecaturHawk

Cyburbian
Messages
880
Points
22
OK, GTC #103 (Evansville, IN) was pretty easy. Maybe this one will be a bit more challenging....
 

Rumpy Tunanator

Cyburbian
Messages
4,473
Points
25
Yodan731 said:
Who wants to start cooking with fire and do a "Guess the Suburb #1"
-You play with fire and your going to get burned;)

-Guess the suburb huh, that would be pretty tough seeing how they all look the same.
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
Messages
5,270
Points
30
JNA said:
I like Budgie's guess.
It's not really a guess. I know for a fact that is Abilene. I can tell you the land use and zoning for nearly every building in this picture. I was the neighborhood planner in Abilene in the middle 90's.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
13,902
Points
57
Re: Gtc #104

DecaturHawk said:
OK, GTC #103 (Evansville, IN) was pretty easy. Maybe this one will be a bit more challenging....
Holy flat plain, Batman!!

Geez, that is flat!
 

DecaturHawk

Cyburbian
Messages
880
Points
22
Wasn't so hard, after all...

Budgie is right, of course. It's Abilene. I lived there for a year in the mid '80's and haven't been back. At the time I lived there I didn't have a high opinion of the place, but with hindsight I look back on that year with some affection and would like to go back and look around.

I worked as a campus minister for the small minority of Catholic students at the three colleges. I remember how I would see Abilene Christian University students at restaurants order alcoholic drinks in a coffee cup, in fear that an ACU faculty member might be in the establishment (drinking was highly proscribed for ACU students).

Interesting planning story about Abilene: Abilene was the last of the larger cities in Texas to remain dry. When the state Supreme Court determined that cities could decide to go wet without the entire county doing so, some enterprising landowners north of Abilene incorporated about 50 acres with a population of about 50 and named their new town "Impact." The town had only two, thriving businesses, both liquor stores. Abilene moved quickly and annexed all of the land around the town, surrounding it. Abilene finally voted to go wet sometime in the 70's, I believe.

The year I lived there the drought was so bad that the edge of the water in Lake Fort Phantom Hill (the city's main water source) was about 40 yards from it's normal shoreline. Yes, it's flat, there, but that area certainly has no monopoly on flatness (take Central Illinois, for instance). There are some interesting landforms nearby, but what I remember most is how everything seems to be brown all year around. At least we have some green here.

Way to go, Budgie! I'm going to find a more challenging GTC one of these days.
 
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