• Ongoing coronavirus / COVID-19 discussion: how is the pandemic affecting your community, workplace, and wellness? 🦠

    Working from home? So are we. Come join us! Cyburbia is a friendly big tent, where we share our experiences and thoughts about urban planning practice, planning adjacent topics, and whatever else comes to mind. No ads, no spam, no social distancing.

Headline of the week

Rumpy Tunanator

Cyburbian
Messages
4,473
Points
25
killed the raccoon on December 12, then skinned and ate some of it after cooking the meat. The students also must apologize and give an educational speech about animal cruelty to the fraternity.

Mighty tasty :p
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
An animal falls on the ground and begins convulsing. What do you do? Somehow, I don't think "eat it" is the best answer. Is there such a thing as mad raccoon disease?
 

biscuit

Cyburbian
Messages
3,904
Points
25
The story was kind of a none piece if you ask me but the headline Human Society Says No to Racoon Killing Frat Boys, well that just asked to be posted here.


Cardinal said:
An animal falls on the ground and begins convulsing. What do you do? Somehow, I don't think "eat it" is the best answer. Is there such a thing as mad raccoon disease?
I was thinking the same thing. Exactly why would you want to eat a convulsing animal, especially a racoon. But then you have to think that these boys go to UGA, they probably just didn't know any better. ;-)
 

Queen B

Cyburbian
Messages
3,178
Points
25
And after charges were filed the officers, lawyers and humane society folks all went out and ate a big steak supper! I am sure cattle die a peaceful quite death.

That story made it sound like no one would ever think about killing and eating a racoon. It has been going on forever, no different than fishing or deer hunting.
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
Messages
5,270
Points
30
I think it is legal to eat road kill in some states. Arizona comes to mind. Can anyone confirm this?
 

Tom R

Cyburbian
Messages
2,274
Points
25
rocky

With the high rate of rabies among the racoon population, the frat boys may have done the community a service, and if they get rabies, an even bigger service.
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
30
Budgie said:
I think it is legal to eat road kill in some states. Arizona comes to mind. Can anyone confirm this?


I found this note on the web at http://www.foodreference.com/html/troadkill.html

In West Virginia if you run over an animal, you can legally take it home and cook it for dinner. A law passed in 1998 lets drivers keep their road kill, as long as they report it within 12 hours. According to supporters of the new law, the state will the save money that had been used to have Highway Division employees remove dead animals from the road.

This could be true as there is a road kill cook off in Marlinton each September and it was reported on ABC News.

Does having a road kill cook off as a tourist attraction count as RUGGED?
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
14,146
Points
58
Budgie said:
I think it is legal to eat road kill in some states. Arizona comes to mind. Can anyone confirm this?

In Michigan, if you hit a deer with your car during hunting season, it's your. You just have to notify the DNR.
 

ludes98

Cyburbian
Messages
1,264
Points
22
Budgie said:
I think it is legal to eat road kill in some states. Arizona comes to mind. Can anyone confirm this?
OK since I am one of the few Arizonans here, it is in fact legal to take home large game (deer, elk) killed on a road with permit. However the state assumes no liability for its edibility. 8-! You can also make gifts of part of the carcass. I didn't see anything on small game.

Arizona Revised Statutes:


17-319. Big game killed by motor vehicle; salvage permit; violation; classification

A. Notwithstanding any other provision of this title, the carcass of a big game animal that has been killed as a result of an accidental collision with a motor vehicle on a maintained road may be possessed and transported by the driver of the vehicle if the driver first obtains a big game salvage permit issued by a peace officer. A person may possess or transport the carcass or any part of the carcass of a big game animal killed as a result of an accidental collision with a motor vehicle only as provided by this section.

B. The department shall provide big game salvage permit forms to peace officers on request. The permit may be issued only in the name of the driver of the motor vehicle and is not transferable. The permit form shall require the following information:

1. The name and address of the motor vehicle driver.

2. A description of the big game animal that was killed.

3. The date of the collision.

4. The specific location of the collision.

5. A description of the motor vehicle.

6. The destination where the carcass will be transported.

7. The name of the peace officer who issued the permit.

C. The peace officer shall:

1. Complete all of the information required on the permit.

2. Give the original of the permit to the driver of the motor vehicle.

3. Mail a copy of the permit to the department within forty-eight hours after issuing the permit.

D. A peace officer may inspect the carcass and motor vehicle prior to issuing the permit. The carcass and motor vehicle are subject to inspection by a game ranger within twenty days after issuance of the permit. If the carcass has been processed or if the motor vehicle has been repaired, a game ranger may inspect the invoices or other documents recording the processing or repair.

E. A person who possesses the carcass of a big game animal pursuant to this section may place all or part of the carcass in storage pursuant to section 17-373 or may make a gift of the carcass or parts to another individual.

F. A permit issued under this section carries no representation or implication that any part of the carcass is edible. Neither the peace officer, the agency employing the peace officer nor the department is liable with respect to any use made of the carcass.

G. A person who possesses a carcass of a big game animal under authority of a big game salvage permit that was obtained by fraud is guilty of a class 1 misdemeanor.
 

BiteMeElmo

Cyburbian
Messages
324
Points
11
"...then skinned and ate some of it"

"Zimmerman has said he shot the animal with a pellet gun after it fell on the ground and began convulsing."

MMMMM, that's some good diseased raccoon.

Sounds like a highly-anticipated Darwin Award in the making.
 
Top