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Help a prospective planning grad student

jdstl1977

Cyburbian
Messages
80
Points
4
I have a BA in Art History from 2000. I've worked the past four years and am now looking to apply to urban planning graduate programs in Fall '05. I'm taking Sociological Statistics and Microeconomics this summer and the last 60 hours of my undergrad GPA comes to 3.29, if I calculated it right.

I'm interested in working for private (consulting) firms in international development/planning. Can anyone recommend any good schools or rankings of schools? I'm going to look at the ACSP's Guide but I don't know how much help that will be.

I've been looking at UIUC's program but haven't really seen anyone talk about it on here.

Any recommendations/suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Edit: Did I make some faux pas by saying I wanted to work for a private consulting firm in international development?
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,554
Points
42
jdstl1977 said:
Did I make some faux pas by saying I wanted to work for a private consulting firm in international development?

Nope, no faux pas at all. It's probably a combination of things -- a post late in the week before a long holiday weekend and the fact that most of the professional planners here are in the public sector, working everything from rural, regional, town and city planning. The private sector planners are either involved with the consulting side (typically to other municipal planning agencies) or the development side. Traffic to the site will pick up Monday when our Canadian, Australian, Indian and New Zealand folks show up (and even a possible visit from our resident Chilean), and Tuesday when the rest of the Yanks are back to work.

I read your post earlier but didn't reply because I really don't know the answer to your question. If my experience from Ball State is any indication, you would have to double-major at most schools, probably in business, international relations or some such, and planning. Maybe the Columbias, Penns, and other larger schools offer something in your area of interest.

Are you fluent in a foreign language?
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
26,023
Points
64
jdstl1977 said:
... I wanted to work for a private consulting firm in international development?

Here is a sideways approach toward your interest,
If you attend church,
If so, then does your church do short mission trips of 1-2 weeks
overseas helping to build/repair say a school / community center ?

I agree with Gedunker on probable double major and language.
 
Messages
14
Points
1
Usc

Look into USC. For someone with interest in the private sector development, I think USC's strong connection to the private sector may be helpful. The business school is right next to the planning (and public policy) school. The school also offers a lot of real estate development classes, which I've heard become handy in the private sector. LA, also, is a major North American gate to the Pacific Rim; it's an exciting place for people with interest in international development.
 

jdstl1977

Cyburbian
Messages
80
Points
4
Thanks for the clarification. I've found some international development strains in a few schools listed in the ACSP's Guide. I'm really looking at schools that require a capstone project rather than a Master's Thesis. A Dual-Degree might be the route I'd have to go to look attractive to international development firms. I'm researching on both sides: what academic departments offer and what firms seem to value or look for.

Gedunker said:
Nope, no faux pas at all. It's probably a combination of things -- a post late in the week before a long holiday weekend and the fact that most of the professional planners here are in the public sector, working everything from rural, regional, town and city planning. The private sector planners are either involved with the consulting side (typically to other municipal planning agencies) or the development side. Traffic to the site will pick up Monday when our Canadian, Australian, Indian and New Zealand folks show up (and even a possible visit from our resident Chilean), and Tuesday when the rest of the Yanks are back to work.

I read your post earlier but didn't reply because I really don't know the answer to your question. If my experience from Ball State is any indication, you would have to double-major at most schools, probably in business, international relations or some such, and planning. Maybe the Columbias, Penns, and other larger schools offer something in your area of interest.

Are you fluent in a foreign language?

I'm looking to do things on a larger scale. Helping on development or reuse projects like the work that was done on redeveloping Clark Air Force Base in the Philippines after the US military left.

As for language, I took many years of Spanish but I barely remember any of it because of lack of use.


JNA said:
Here is a sideways approach toward your interest,
If you attend church,
If so, then does your church do short mission trips of 1-2 weeks
overseas helping to build/repair say a school / community center ?

I agree with Gedunker on probable double major and language.
 

roger

Cyburbian
Messages
118
Points
6
Hey not to threadjack or anything but I'm kind of in the same boat...interested in getting a master's and working in private consulting.

From browsing the site I gather that USC is a good school for those wanting to be in the private sector. Are there any others out there? Looking for programs with strong real estate development/transportation planning curricula.
 

bmoore81

Member
Messages
19
Points
1
roger said:
Hey not to threadjack or anything but I'm kind of in the same boat...interested in getting a master's and working in private consulting.

From browsing the site I gather that USC is a good school for those wanting to be in the private sector. Are there any others out there? Looking for programs with strong real estate development/transportation planning curricula.

Roger, your best bet really is USC for that category of topics. They have the lusk center for real estate. But if you want transportation and real estate for private sector, you can manage a combo at UCLA and USC where you take classes from each university. UCLA having the stronger transportation planning, and USC having the stronger Real estate development.

Good luck
[Thread jacking terminated]

jdstl1977,
for international development the los angeles area is a good bet, specifically pacific rim stuff. otherwise I would look at georgetown in DC because of proximity to international organizations and US govt.
Good Luck
 
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