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Help! Discussing Density

Messages
3,690
Points
27
Hey guys, I'm meeting with our Town Board to discuss our impending comp plan - and the issue of density is bound to come up. i vaguely remember an article or book about how to discuss density with non-planner types, along the lines of "in discussions about high density residential, don't ever use the words "high density". even if you haven't a clue about where i might find this article or book, any advice would be supremely appreciated.

thanks,
kel
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,624
Points
34
I dont recall the article your referencing, but I usually keep it to du/acre, and use real examples + photos so they can visualize.

It was an important lesson in my job to show them that the residential subdivision the typical board member lives in had the same (in some cases higher) density than the apartment complex they dread.
 

Jeff

Cyburbian
Messages
4,161
Points
27
Explain it in terms of pizza or pie, seriously. 1 acre equals a pie/pizza; however many slices you decide to cut it into is up to you.

When illustrating I can't emphasize enough the importance of using a large scale drawing, like 1:30 or 1:20 it looks "less dense." That's a scumbag developer trick for you ;)
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,624
Points
34
Mike DeVuono said:
When illustrating I can't emphasize enough the importance of using a large scale drawing, like 1:30 or 1:20 it looks "less dense." That's a scumbag developer trick for you ;)
That's straight out pf the book, "How to Lie With Maps". It's a must have for any planners library.
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,853
Points
39
I like to have our carto folks do a visual of what it would look like from above; superimpose the lots on the property and then draw in the rooftops so it looks hopelessly crowded. Of course, that's probably not the effect you're looking for here.
 
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