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Help with 3D rendering?

Bunabayashi

Cyburbian
Messages
27
Points
2
Hi,

My lastest project involves producing a 3D representation of a small community in Alexandria (Colecroft condominiums, at the intersection of Oronoco and West St.). How would you CAD folks go about doing that? As a strict draftsman, one of my few options (other than a physical model, which is pretty much out of the question because of the deadline-- next Tuesday) is to create a basemap from an aerial survey, then do a perspective drawing from that. Yikes! Huge, vast swaths of time. Any thoughts appreciated,

Dave
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
30
Is this to be a massing model or a true representation of what is already there/proposed?

Answer will depend on scope and scale needed.
 

Bunabayashi

Cyburbian
Messages
27
Points
2
It's a part of the site analysis process, and it would encompass all that is there right now. Something that would be presented to the client for an initial consultation... we have a loose list of program development tasks, but they need to be clarified at this first meeting. Having walked the site and having seen a very good aerial image of the space from terraserver, I'm comfortable working in plan view, however that's insufficient for the purposes of the assignment. Does my answer qualify as responsive? :p

Dave
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
30
I'll assume that a massing model is enough.

I am assuming you are using autocad and have a relatively proficient knowledge of it and the basics of 3D. Lots of layers makes this easier, as does various colours during initial drawing.

What I'd do is draw the site plan in plan view then spin the UCS, on the x axis 90 degrees, and draw the general shape/mass of the building. Then use the 3D face commands to place a skin on each surface. Make sure that the UCS is set to match the face of the building before doing it, or things can go horribly wrong. Once the facing is done use the HIDE or RENDER command make it "solid".

If need be, you can add typical details to portions of the building and highlight them through the use of viewports. If the details are repetitive and your prof wants them everywhere, draw them once then block them out and reinsert multiple times.

If you need a perspective of the building, use the viewpoint command and play with the camera feature to give you the drawing the way you want to see it.

If the site in question has topographic features (ie hills) that must be included then draw the contours in plan and using MOVE adjust the z values accordingly, then use 3D face between teh lines to simulate a solid hill surface.

Trees and shrubs can be drawn easily using spheres and columns. Just block them out to save file space.

Hope these tips help. Feel free to ask more questions.
 

Doitnow

Cyburbian
Messages
496
Points
16
If your aerial image can give you a clear building foot print map, you need the vectorise that quickly- and it should take more than a day( the whole process).
One day to recce the area with multiple prints in hand and noting down teh real heights and if possible take some digital snaps.
Two days to fo the 3D Modelling as donk suggested.
If possible drape some of the phographs after some workign on some graphicas software.
I would try to do it this way.
The 3d modelling tools in Autocad are very easy and can be used for the alternative design at the initial stages of the project. I have used these tools many times to much use really.
I hope what I say is of some use to you!! :)
 

kickert

Member
Messages
19
Points
1
It's strange to see nobody here recommended Sketchup before. This is a 3d modelling tool. Very easy to learn, and very, very fast. I have done a project in Holland with the program. Just take an aerial photograph, draw lines on it, this automatically makes 'regions' in Acad language, and then these regions can instantly be pulled out into 'solids'. Trust me, this is easier than AutoCad.

The only drawback is that AutoCad is a very precise cad-program, and Sketchup, as the name already states, is more a sketchy program. This does have it's advantages in speed however.

Just look at it, www.sketchup.com . No I don't own Sketchup shares :).
 
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