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Help With Dying Malls Research

daytondevelopment

Cyburbian
Messages
33
Points
2
Hi all... I am going to do a study on a mall in my home county. We have a mall that is about 35 years old. There is nothing special about this mall, but it once was the center of shopping in the county. Now, we have become home to a "Sprawl-Mart" and other big boxes, and plans were just announced for the construction of St. Clair Commons, a mall similar to that of the Easton Towne Center in Columbus, Ohio.

I am utterly convinced that the mall will be dead within 10-15 years, as it is already showing signs of dilapidation (a flea-market has taken up shop in the former Elder Beerman store :-# ).

If you know of any resources that I can use to help prove my mall is dying, please let me know. I am looking for books, sites (not deadmalls.com), and other sources of information. Please point me in the right direction!

Thank you so much!!!

Jay
 

ssc

Cyburbian
Messages
209
Points
9
daytondevelopment said:
Hi all... I am going to do a study on a mall in my home county. We have a mall that is about 35 years old. There is nothing special about this mall, but it once was the center of shopping in the county. Now, we have become home to a "Sprawl-Mart" and other big boxes, and plans were just announced for the construction of St. Clair Commons, a mall similar to that of the Easton Towne Center in Columbus, Ohio.

I am utterly convinced that the mall will be dead within 10-15 years, as it is already showing signs of dilapidation (a flea-market has taken up shop in the former Elder Beerman store :-# ).

If you know of any resources that I can use to help prove my mall is dying, please let me know. I am looking for books, sites (not deadmalls.com), and other sources of information. Please point me in the right direction!

Thank you so much!!!

Jay
A couple of quick ideas:

Have you considered doing a spending power analysis of the region? You could look at the current capture rate to determine if there is untapped market or if new retail development can only be successful if it saps the market of existing businesses (such as the dying :-# mall). Make sure you look at population trends to take into account future spending power in the region.

Also, look at the anchor stores in the mall. In general, a mall (or any other retail cluster) cannot survive without one or more anchors.Are the anchors national chains, regional chains, upscale, midmarket? Have they shut down/moved/renovated/upgraded other locations?

BTW, you may want to preface your hypothesis with "If current trends continue" since there are examples of malls that have been "revitalized."

Good luck with your study.
 

Suburb Repairman

moderator in moderation
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
7,414
Points
34
There is a mall in Victoria, Texas that is in a similar situation. Really, it's pretty much already dead. Like your mall, it used to be the center of the universe for the county, but the major anchors moved on. I believe it is called Towne Plaza Mall and was built in the late sixties or early seventies. It was actually mentioned by name in the City's comprehensive plan for being a site in desperate need of redevelopment. You can visit the Victoria website by clicking here.

I hope that is some help. They might be able to give you a timeline for that mall's death and what has happened to it and the area around it since then.
 

The One

Cyburbian
Messages
8,289
Points
30
Proximity

Just some things to look for:
Are there any other malls being built within 5-10 miles of the existing mall? New malls and power centers can dismantle the market area for old malls, hastening the decline and eventual death.... :-# Also, walk through the mall and see how many of the units are vacant (pay close attention to the main level corner units). See if the management company will give you the vacancy rate and change in rents in the last two years (fat chance). Are the anchor stores in trouble? Looking to move?
 

ken48170

Member
Messages
6
Points
0
Detroit Retail

In Todays Detroit News, a story about retailers going out of business and perhaps government offices moving in:

http://www.detnews.com/2004/metro/0410/12/a01-301041.htm

You may want to look at Wonderland Mall in Livonia, MI. It just just died in the past year or so. First the leading stores left, leaving just dollar type stores and Jeepers Creepers inside, it got really bad.
 

The One

Cyburbian
Messages
8,289
Points
30
Great.....

ken48170 said:
In Todays Detroit News, a story about retailers going out of business and perhaps government offices moving in:

http://www.detnews.com/2004/metro/0410/12/a01-301041.htm

You may want to look at Wonderland Mall in Livonia, MI. It just just died in the past year or so. First the leading stores left, leaving just dollar type stores and Jeepers Creepers inside, it got really bad.
Yet another crappy place to stick the government worker......I may start a thread on this one.....
 

JusticeZero

Cyburbian
Messages
367
Points
12
Been there, done that. Lots of government offices in malls here, even relatively lively ones.
In my hometown there was a mall with a grocery store (old one-anchor design enclosed mall with a courtyard). A new grocery store decided to move in at a better location and bought the mall outright, raised leases and drove everyone out, then left it abandoned for a few years.
It's now the DMV, Fish and Game main offices in the area, a few other major political offices, and the old grocery store is now a bottled water plant. I seem to recall some odd things happening to distribution of other businesses shortly thereafter, on account of the commerce center shifting traffic patterns. The new grocery store was a two-anchor design with a small second anchor, but were never able to get a strong anchor in; that whole wing of the building except for the mall collapsed (it's gated off right after the mandatory liquor store neighboring the grocery store and is closed, currently a Salvation Army operates out of the secondary anchor point) but the grocery store has been running strong for years. It's parent company was recently bought by Safeway, and more recently, a Fred Meyers openned across the street, which has no 'mall' component, just a big box of the store and the liquor store division walled off in the entryway. (As my understanding goes, it is illegal in Alaska to sell liquor in a grocery store, therefore every grocery store has an attached liquor store.)
Both stores have very frustrating traffic patterns that wreak havok on the intersection of two arterial highways that they share; the entrances and exits are seriously obnoxious and many think life would be easier if they had their on cloverleaf, or some darned thing.

Anyways, there's a bit of a huge pointless ramble, much of which might be better suited for other threads...
 
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