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Book club 📖 Hemingway Documentary

Maister

Chairman of the bored
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I'm sure most of you have heard that Ken Burns is at it again and now has "Hemingway" airing on PBS stations across the country this week. We watched the first episode of the three part series, and I was left with a feeling of general...I don't know...maybe discomfort. I should confess for the record I've never actually read an entire novel of his, but am well aware of his laconic writing style. The thing that bugged me about him was how absolutely shitty he treated the women in his life. We see this time and again where men that are regarded as geniuses turn out to be serial philanderers. I guess he seemed to be all about pursuing the Next New Emotionally Powerful Experience. Women were but one aspect of that appetite.

Any learned folk here ever read Hemingway? Did his sparse writing style somehow speak to you or draw you in?

 

Bubba

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I've read a few Hemingway novels - I liked them and his writing style. With that said, the best summation I've ever heard of Hemingway was a line in the movie 10 Things I Hate About You:

Romantic? Hemingway? He was an abusive, alcoholic misogynist who squandered half of his life hanging around Picasso trying to nail his leftovers.
 

Hawkeye66

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The single best chapter I have read is El Sordo's last stand in For Whom the Bell Tolls. The whole book is pretty good and I learned a lot about the Spanish Civil War by reading it, but that chapter stands out. So much in fact that Metallica wrote a song about it.....

 

michaelskis

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I'm sure most of you have heard that Ken Burns is at it again and now has "Hemingway" airing on PBS stations across the country this week. We watched the first episode of the three part series, and I was left with a feeling of general...I don't know...maybe discomfort. I should confess for the record I've never actually read an entire novel of his, but am well aware of his laconic writing style. The thing that bugged me about him was how absolutely shitty he treated the women in his life. We see this time and again where men that are regarded as geniuses turn out to be serial philanderers. I guess he seemed to be all about pursuing the Next New Emotionally Powerful Experience. Women were but one aspect of that appetite.

Any learned folk here ever read Hemingway? Did his sparse writing style somehow speak to you or draw you in?


I have read a couple of his short stories, starting with Big Two Hearted River since Michigan's Upper Peninsula was the inspiration for the story. The only novel I read of his that I can recall is the Old Man and the Sea. I thought they were good, but I kept looking for the Michigan connection in his works.

Otherwise, I didn't know all that much about him. I will have to check out the documentary, it sounds interesting.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
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The only novel of his I've read is The Old Man and The Sea, which I remember enjoying (I read it in high school).

But perhaps that was because he wrote it near the end of this life and his 'style' had matured/solidified...or he had finally grownup emotionally.

I used live in Oak Park, IL and took the tour of his boyhood home. In case you care, Oak Park, IL is now culturally and socially almost the opposite of how Hemingway described it was during his formative years.
 
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MD Planner

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I've read a bunch of his stuff. I really enjoy some of the short stories. I just visited his home in Key West 3 weeks ago. The docents there are pretty good at providing a brief overview of all of his issues and don't make him out to be some amazing person. A gifted writer, but a shitty person in many ways. He definitely had demons as he eventually took his own life. His father did as well. But if you ever have the chance, take the guided tour. It's worth it.

Here is the requisite picture of one of the famous 6-toed cats:

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