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Health 🏥 Hereditary medical conditions

Maister

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Certain medical conditions have strong genetic components. Online I see a list of 7 conditions with strong hereditary components:
7 common multifactorial genetic inheritance disorders
  • heart disease,
  • high blood pressure,
  • Alzheimer's disease,
  • arthritis,
  • diabetes,
  • cancer, and.
  • obesity.
My wife's family has diabetes documented going back several generations, and it's tragic. On my side of the family cancer has claimed the majority of my ancestors within the past three generations.

It's possible that one can reduce to an extent risk factors by trying to control environmental conditions, but this is no guarantee one can avoid fate if the chromosomes determine your number is up. Who here has family histories with medical conditions that scare the bejeezus out of them? Are you doing what you can to control environmental factors to avoid that fate?

The human genome project is almost certain to explode new possibilities in the coming years. I suspect by the end of the 21st century humans will experience far less of these time-bomb plagues and our species will be healthier and more durable for it.
 

kjel

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Diabetes and obesity on my maternal side. I've put together a family tree and its amazing how many from that particular family line have died in their 50s or early 60s from poorly controlled diabetes or comorbidities. My paternal side had a string of men that had widowmaker heart attacks in their 40s.
 

Maister

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I know this is kind of a downer thread. My inlaws had a debate among themselves about whether or not to be tested for a certain marker for cancer. Those with it have an 80% chance of getting a certain type of cancer. Ultimately, none of them chose to have the testing done. I tend to hold fatalistic views, and the knowledge that I had such a marker would probably not move me one way or another, but at the same time I guess I can understand not wanting to know something bad will likely happen if there's little/nothing you can do to prevent it.
 

kjel

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I am one of those people that would rather know things before they happened.
 
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