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High chimneys

cnyOntario

Member
Messages
64
Points
4
Parts of the Midwest have a distinct housing feature. High chimneys which rise above the roof in single family homes and townhouses.

Is this an architectural detail for aesthetic reasons, or is there a practical reason for this? I don't see this housing feature in new subdivisions in the Syracuse area.

here is an example:

 

Richmond Jake

You can't fight in here. This is the War Room!
Messages
18,313
Points
44
I think the building code requires chimineys to be at least 2-feet higher than the nearest point within a 10-foot radius?
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
25,636
Points
59
From: the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development's Residential Rehabilitation Inspection Guide
http://www.hud-inspections.com/Chimney/ChimneyHeight.html

Chimneys must extend at least 2 feet higher than any portion of the roof or any structure within 10 feet, but must be not less than 3 feet above the point where the chimney passes through the roof.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
As I was told several years ago, you want the outlet to your chimney above anything else mainly to prevent downdrafts that could force smoke (and CO2) back into the house. I won't guarantee the validity of this comment, but it seems to make sense to me.
 

boiker

Cyburbian
Messages
3,889
Points
26
take a look at most old homes that haven't had their chimney's chopped off or replaced.

They are often very tall. My guess is with coal and wood fuel, build the chimney tall, all the pollutants are over your head. Also, any potential cinders would cool enough before ejecting.
 

UpstateNYRox

Cyburbian
Messages
45
Points
2
bizzo34> Do you have any pics of the new housing in Syracuse that you talk about without the high chimneys?
 

cnyOntario

Member
Messages
64
Points
4
That was my point. New housing in the Syracuse area do not have visible tall chimneys. Almost all new housing in the Midwest do.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
bizzo34 said:
That was my point. New housing in the Syracuse area do not have visible tall chimneys. Almost all new housing in the Midwest do.
Now I understand. I am not so sure I would agree with you. Most of the new housing we see here is like what you posted in the second photo. The cost of construction is reduced by not having a traditional chimney. The exceptions seem to be on more espensive housing. Your second photo could very easily be a subdivision in my community, although it would have sidewalks and terrace trees.
 
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