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highyl industralized nations and their policys

TURaj

Member
Messages
13
Points
1
let me know what you think

Should the highly industrialized nations of the world be pressing the developing countries to adopt policies to control pollution even if controlling pollution may hamper growth in these developing economies? Since the environmental effects from Third World pollution often spill over to the highly industrialized parts of the world, do the leaders of the U.S., Japan, and the European nations have an obligation to press polluting countries to reduce their emissions?

Well i began to think that The developing countries could learn from the developed countries mistakes. Many of the developed countries have perservered through the years by persistance, education, knowledge and trial and error. These developing countries could skip decades of deadly mistakes and learn from their more dominat neighbors. If the world acted as a community on this matter and assisted each other for a cleaner globe, not just in their own counrties interest but in the interest of every nation, a major improvemnt could emerge. Implementing global funding policies to help developing countries still develope without the pollution could work or even develope international production forces to help the struggling nations give jobs, money, and national economic support would be good. By helping your neighbor you are really saving yourslef in this matter, even if that means giving your neighbor money and allowing him to learn from your mistakes.

i think this is an interesting topic, so leave me some feedback and your opinions
 

Bangorian

Member
Messages
198
Points
7
Unfortunately, it is often times the corporations from the "developed" nations that are colonizing the developing nations and taking advantage of their lack of environmental laws, and contributing to a majority of industrial pollution. Therefore, if we're sending our corporations over there to put industrial pollutants in the air and water, then hell yeah they should have to abide by higher standards.

What was the name of that place in India where the gas release from a nearby factory (US Corporation-owned) that killed an entire village???

Are there "model" global environmental regs - like has the UN or NATO or anyone else adopted anything like that?

In general, in my opinion, globalization is a bunch of junk. Lets make the rest of the world just like the US! That'll solve all the problems!!! How about this bold idea: Lets take care of the poverty in our own country before we start ramming our lifestyle down the throat of some african tribe in the name of improving their quality of life (by making them wage slaves and destroying their social networks)!! Oh yeah, and we need to KEEP Blue collar jobs in the US, not send them abroad!
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
MaineMan said:
What was the name of that place in India where the gas release from a nearby factory (US Corporation-owned) that killed an entire village???
Bhopal.

Yes, we should be pressuring other countries, developing or developed, to adopt stricter environmental standards and workplace standards, just as they should be pressuring us to stop some of our questionable practices (such as in agriculture). We are all on the same planet, and it is difficult to say that the actions of any one country do not impact the rest of the world.

It may not seem fair to under-developed nations that the Western world "got away with" dumping countless tonnes of pollution into the ground, air, and rivers during centuries of industrial development. Now we have to contend with the results, and if we were to go back in time, I would hope we would have the intelligence to amend some of those practices.
 

jresta

Cyburbian
Messages
1,474
Points
23
Union Carbide (now Dow Chemical) didn't just kill a "village" they killed 8,000 people instantly another 6,000 died later. They also injured 500,000 - 120,000 of them permanently.

So yeah, i agree. If capital is free to go wherever it wants in search of cheap labor then labor should have the same rights to go wherever it wants in search of better wages.

This creates obvious logistical problems so environmental, labor, and safety regs should be just as "across the board" as the WTO to make up for it.
 
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