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Home Improvement

Habanero

Cyburbian
Messages
3,217
Points
27
Dawn dish soap and HOT vinegar can really clean a bathtub.

I've never really bought household cleansers. Vinegar, bleach, baking soda and borax are about all you need.

I use lemon or orange essential oils too, that stuff will remove anything sticky.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

giff57

Corn Burning Fool
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
5,456
Points
34
DIY Barn Door

I had an odd L shaped kitchen with an entry door and bathroom in the bottom of the L. I decided to wall off this potion to form a mud room. After pricing barn door hardware, I decided to build the door and hardware from scratch see photos below for the results. It turned out great, and the additional wall served to add more cabinetry on the kitchen side of the wall. I did write "Donald Trumps wall 2016" on the back side of one of the sheets of drywall in sharpie.



Barn door by cityplan_2000, on Flickr

Barn door project by cityplan_2000, on Flickr
 

AG74683

Cyburbian
Messages
7,171
Points
40
I've tried hard to find somewhere in my house that could support a barn door because I love the look of them, but alas, nothing seems to work. Your's looks wonderful!
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
15,517
Points
53
That would look great on my laundry room, but it sounds like a lot of work so I don't think I'll try it. Unless my door were to suddenly break. ;)
 

AG74683

Cyburbian
Messages
7,171
Points
40
So I've been pushed to move my attic access project towards the top of the list. My parents are tiring of all my junk at their house so I need to get up there and get some good storage space going. I also need to get up there to be able to run wiring for security cameras and a home network in the future, plus I need overhead lighting in my two guest bedrooms.

I believe I've decided on a spot to put it. I have a ranch style house with an open carport so I can't really fit a full size access with a standard ladder because the ceiling joists run east/west while the house floor plan runs north/south. Is this an easy project for the standard homeowner to do? The opening will probably only be 3' x 3' max. I want to install a pull down door in it with a small telescoping ladder. Do exposed attic doors like this lower property values any?
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
14,255
Points
57
So I've been pushed to move my attic access project towards the top of the list. My parents are tiring of all my junk at their house so I need to get up there and get some good storage space going. I also need to get up there to be able to run wiring for security cameras and a home network in the future, plus I need overhead lighting in my two guest bedrooms.

I believe I've decided on a spot to put it. I have a ranch style house with an open carport so I can't really fit a full size access with a standard ladder because the ceiling joists run east/west while the house floor plan runs north/south. Is this an easy project for the standard homeowner to do? The opening will probably only be 3' x 3' max. I want to install a pull down door in it with a small telescoping ladder. Do exposed attic doors like this lower property values any?

We have the standard pull down attic stairs in the garage and works great to access the entire attic. We also have a 3' x 3' attic access is the master walk-in closet on the other side of the house from the garage. In the 4 years we've lived there, I've only opened the closet access hatch once. More convenience and ease of access.

In the house I grew up in, we had a pull down attic stairs in the hallway. It was a ranch house and when in between beams. It had the same issue of ease/west vs. north/south. You just have to box in the one you'll have to cut. The worst part is all the dust when you cut the ceiling. You could do it, but you'll want an extra hand.

I think the only time it would negatively affect your property value is if you put in one of the main rooms...living room, dining room, kitchen, master bedroom. Other than that, it should help.
 

AG74683

Cyburbian
Messages
7,171
Points
40
I think the only time it would negatively affect your property value is if you put in one of the main rooms...living room, dining room, kitchen, master bedroom. Other than that, it should help.

Hm, the plan was to put it in the master bedroom actually. The intent there was basically that the only people who will see it are those staying in the master bedroom. I have a main beam running down the middle of the house and the plan for the hatch is just to the side of that. I really don't see any other area to place it besides one of the bedrooms. I suppose I could put it in the hallway but it would be much easier to see there. There's an odd knee wall thing separating the split level portion of the house from the rest and I'm not sure if it's critical for anything, and the carport is blocked off for some reason, it looks like with OSB.

Now I COULD put it in the carport, but then I'd have to rig up some sort of locking system and I don't have much interest in that.
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
15,517
Points
53
Hallway is a pretty common place to put it. I don't have room for a nice drop down ladder and there's no room in the attic to store stuff anyway, but my access is in the closet of the kids bedroom. It's a PITA to get up there.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,877
Points
57
We have ours at the top of our stairs. Make sure that you have enough space to fully extend the ladder. The builders make that mistake with our house. The pull down door would operate fine, but when you went to unfold the ladder, it hit the wall before the floor, so we had them move it 3 feet so it opened into a door way.

The other thing is keep in mind the direction of the framing for your roof when you are laying it out. It is much simpler to run it between ceiling joists than it is to cut them, frame in around them with LVLs and make sure that everything is up to code again.

Finally, get a pre-insulated hatch with weather stripping and make sure it is airtight when it is closed.
 

AG74683

Cyburbian
Messages
7,171
Points
40
The other thing is keep in mind the direction of the framing for your roof when you are laying it out. It is much simpler to run it between ceiling joists than it is to cut them, frame in around them with LVLs and make sure that everything is up to code again.

See, that's another problem, I think my joists are probably 16". I probably have no choice put to cut one.
 

Richmond Jake

You can't fight in here. This is the War Room!
Messages
18,300
Points
44
We can't decide if we should have the kitchen counter tops replaced (they need it) or if we should just allow the next owner to select the color and product.
 

AG74683

Cyburbian
Messages
7,171
Points
40
I did a bunch of yard work this weekend. I finally disposed of some nasty rose bushes I had no real desire to keep. They hadn't been taken care of for years and had grown completely out of hand and rarely produced flowers. I need to replace the split rail fence they were on now. I decided this morning that I'm going to tear down the terrible arbor the previous owner built. It's complete garbage. He built it on 4x4 posts and over spanned 2 x 6's he used. They sag in the middle now, and one of them got destroyed by a falling limb earlier this year. I wanted to keep the grapes that are growing on it, but those too haven't been tended and don't really produce grapes worth saving, plus I don't want all that extra landscaping to deal with. They get eaten up by Japanese beetles and I don't feel like spraying stuff to keep them away.
 

dandy_warhol

Cyburbian
Messages
10,199
Points
52
Ack. Having a bit of a panic attack. Just had a contractor over to do an estimate for some small jobs to give some rooms a face-lift. He asked the budget and I told him and am now panicking about spending that much (not much in reality).
 

Richmond Jake

You can't fight in here. This is the War Room!
Messages
18,300
Points
44
Pool deck was pressure washed today. It looks great. "Hell of a job, ZA." The siding is reserved for you-know-who.
 

AG74683

Cyburbian
Messages
7,171
Points
40
Pool deck was pressure washed today. It looks great. "Hell of a job, ZA." The siding is reserved for you-know-who.

What pressure washer do you have? When (or rather IF) my tax return comes I want to buy one. I was looking at an electric one, something like a SunJoe from Amazon. I don't need it to do heavy duty stuff, just the car and around the house (siding, decks, etc.).
 

Richmond Jake

You can't fight in here. This is the War Room!
Messages
18,300
Points
44

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
15,517
Points
53
No home improvement for me. Just fixing the leak under the sink. I hate plumbing. What's worse, the ring holding the garbage disposal in place only had 1 of the 3 screws. WTF?
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
14,255
Points
57
No home improvement for me. Just fixing the leak under the sink. I hate plumbing. What's worse, the ring holding the garbage disposal in place only had 1 of the 3 screws. WTF?

Don't go looking in the breaker box - I needed those 2 screws for something else.
 

AG74683

Cyburbian
Messages
7,171
Points
40
Cut down a 25' + tree in the back yard on Saturday. It was maybe 2 feet from my fence, and over half of it leaned over the fence line. We managed to cut the whole thing down without doing any damage to the fence, and with a chainsaw that had like a 16" bar. It overheated on the biggest cut, so now I'm left with various large logs I can't cut until next weekend.

I think I need to get a chainsaw, but I really can't justify the cost given how little I'd use it.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
11,251
Points
52
Cut down a 25' + tree in the back yard on Saturday. It was maybe 2 feet from my fence, and over half of it leaned over the fence line. We managed to cut the whole thing down without doing any damage to the fence, and with a chainsaw that had like a 16" bar. It overheated on the biggest cut, so now I'm left with various large logs I can't cut until next weekend.

I think I need to get a chainsaw, but I really can't justify the cost given how little I'd use it.

That's how I feel about chainsaws. Every couple years there's a day or a weekend where I could get a lot of use out of it but otherwise the chainsaw would just sit unused wasting money and taking up space. FWIW some of the big box hardware stores rent them out. I would imagine specialty tool and equipment rental places rent them out as well.
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,852
Points
47
That's how I feel about chainsaws. Every couple years there's a day or a weekend where I could get a lot of use out of it but otherwise the chainsaw would just sit unused wasting money and taking up space. FWIW some of the big box hardware stores rent them out. I would imagine specialty tool and equipment rental places rent them out as well.

Our local Stihl dealer rents tools. I rented a chainsaw for something like $20 for 4 hours a few years ago. (Shhhh: I nearly gashed myself in the leg with the damn thing, but we don't talk about that.)

++
I'm going through a "green apple" color phase right now. The book cases I took in the divorce are pretty worn and need to be refreshed. I think they would look good with a distressed "green apple" paint. We'll see.
 

Big Owl

Cyburbian
Messages
2,856
Points
36
Cut down a 25' + tree in the back yard on Saturday. It was maybe 2 feet from my fence, and over half of it leaned over the fence line. We managed to cut the whole thing down without doing any damage to the fence, and with a chainsaw that had like a 16" bar. It overheated on the biggest cut, so now I'm left with various large logs I can't cut until next weekend.

I think I need to get a chainsaw, but I really can't justify the cost given how little I'd use it.

I had a electric chainsaw for the first 10 years that I owned my house, mainly because I couldn't justify buying a more expensive gas powered one. I bought a gas powered one a few years ago and I love not having to drag out an electric cord. It's another gasoline motor I have to maintain. I use the more expensive engineered gas for a 2 cycle engine because it has a longer shelf gas than traditional oil/gas mix. Because I only use it sporadically, I am sure to drain the fluids after use because it keeps me from having to clean the carburetor when it sits for anytime.

You can always rent one from a tool rental place but given your location they maybe a good distance away. We have a home depot with a tool rental department that's somewhat convenient and they offer half day rentals which is good for tools that you just need for relatively simple chores.
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
14,255
Points
57
I have an electric chainsaw with an 8" bar - that my dad had in the early seventies! Still works with all original equipment. It's good enough to cut up the branches that fall.

If I need a "real" chainsaw as my BIL likes to say, I just borrow his. The local hardware place rents Stihl tools & I've used their hedge trimmer with the long reach & everything for like $50 for the day (but rent it on Saturday and keep it Sunday since they aren't open).
 

kjel

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
12,634
Points
44
I was hoping to paint the front door a dark green this weekend but the weather is not cooperating. I need a warmish no rain weekend.
 

TOFB

Cyburbian
Messages
3,000
Points
41
Not enjoying the pool opening routine this year. Another trip to the pool store tomorrow.
 

AG74683

Cyburbian
Messages
7,171
Points
40
Cleaned the gutters this weekend. I decided to put everything in a 5 gallon bucket and dump that into garbage bags rather than dropping everything down onto the ground. Worked a lot better, less cleanup for sure. I took out two wasp nests while I was up there. No one was home so I figured it was okay to spray them.

I have substantial rot in a few soffit areas around the house, but for the life of me I cannot figure out where the water is coming from.
 

Rygor

Cyburbian
Messages
2,758
Points
19
There was a leak coming from my ceiling near where my attic hatch, and incidentally, my A/C air handler is located. Turned out my drip pain was leaking under the unit. Had an A/C guy come out today. He said both main and auxilliary pans need to be replaces as well the coils. Quoted me $3,000 plus tax. 8-!:-c:not: Getting a second opinion/quote, but dang those air conditioning guys really know they can rip you off when you live in Phoenix.
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
30,148
Points
74
There was a leak coming from my ceiling near where my attic hatch, and incidentally, my A/C air handler is located. Turned out my drip pain was leaking under the unit. Had an A/C guy come out today. He said both main and auxilliary pans need to be replaces as well the coils. Quoted me $3,000 plus tax. 8-!:-c:not: Getting a second opinion/quote, but dang those air conditioning guys really know they can rip you off when you live in Phoenix.

[youtube]EUKY-RVDSIc[/youtube]
 

dandy_warhol

Cyburbian
Messages
10,199
Points
52
Handyman is starting work on house on Saturday. 3 new windows, facelift for main bathroom, fixing front porch, painting kitchen cabinets. Happy Mother's Day to me!
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
11,251
Points
52
Cleaned the gutters this weekend. I decided to put everything in a 5 gallon bucket and dump that into garbage bags rather than dropping everything down onto the ground. Worked a lot better, less cleanup for sure. I took out two wasp nests while I was up there. No one was home so I figured it was okay to spray them.

I have substantial rot in a few soffit areas around the house, but for the life of me I cannot figure out where the water is coming from.

What are your soffits made of? Mine are plywood and there is quite a bit of rot on the northside of the house. I think that that side is just more prone to rot because of less direct sunshine (and there's also more shade on that side). It doesn't matter if I clean out my gutters every week and we haven't had rain in a month - that side is always moist. The squirrels also like to dig away at them and the fascia on that side and I've been staging a constant war with them getting into the eaves the past couple years.

I actually just called a contractor yesterday about coming out to get me a quote on removing all the old plywood soffit and replacing it with aluminum or vinyl and then replacing the wood fascia with composite.
 

AG74683

Cyburbian
Messages
7,171
Points
40
What are your soffits made of? Mine are plywood and there is quite a bit of rot on the northside of the house. I think that that side is just more prone to rot because of less direct sunshine (and there's also more shade on that side). It doesn't matter if I clean out my gutters every week and we haven't had rain in a month - that side is always moist. The squirrels also like to dig away at them and the fascia on that side and I've been staging a constant war with them getting into the eaves the past couple years.

I actually just called a contractor yesterday about coming out to get me a quote on removing all the old plywood soffit and replacing it with aluminum or vinyl and then replacing the wood fascia with composite.

Plywood. At some point I want to replace it with aluminum or vinyl and composite fascia just like fascia just like you mentioned, but I don't know if I want to do that before replacing the roof.
 

Veloise

Cyburbian
Messages
6,066
Points
37
Handyman is starting work on house on Saturday. 3 new windows, facelift for main bathroom, fixing front porch, painting kitchen cabinets. Happy Mother's Day to me!

Weren't you going to reconfigure the kitchen?

Take lots of photos. Wall openings, window removals, whatever is happening to your porch...when my home office ceiling was being reworked, I took pics of the new mini-beams placed to support the new drywall. When the tub above started leaking, it made it easier to figure out where the plumbing lines were.
 

Veloise

Cyburbian
Messages
6,066
Points
37
Behold! my garage

Left: as bought, 2014
Middle: used leftover house siding material...contractors left it like this
Right: existing


18425061_10154561477744562_5324143436919650349_n.jpg
 

dandy_warhol

Cyburbian
Messages
10,199
Points
52
Weren't you going to reconfigure the kitchen?

Take lots of photos. Wall openings, window removals, whatever is happening to your porch...when my home office ceiling was being reworked, I took pics of the new mini-beams placed to support the new drywall. When the tub above started leaking, it made it easier to figure out where the plumbing lines were.

After a look at the numbers, ROI, a meeting with the Realtor, and a meeting with the contractor we decided to scrap the kitchen reno and just remove the wallpaper and paint the cabinets.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
11,251
Points
52
Plywood. At some point I want to replace it with aluminum or vinyl and composite fascia just like fascia just like you mentioned, but I don't know if I want to do that before replacing the roof.

I got a second estimate for the work today at lunch and have signed a contract and paid a small deposit. The cost for everything was a bit more than I expected but I never fully accounted for just how much soffit and fascia the job requires - more than 500' linear feet of overhangs on the house. Our house is a ranch of nearly 3,000 sqft and sometimes I look at the roof and dread the day that we need to replace it. If we had a 2-story with the same square footage we could have half of the amount of roof.

Oh well. It's a job I've wanted to have done for a few years. No more bees boring through the wooden fascia. No more squirrels clawing their way into the attic through the soffits and fascia. No more painting. No more periodically replacing or patching rotted pieces...

One thing that has me thinking: We have tons of woodpeckers in our yard and they occasionally like to peck at the fascia. How many times will I hear that machine gun sound from the woodpeckers until they realize they cannot get through the new aluminum stuff?
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
11,251
Points
52
Our old thermostat recently bit the dust and would no longer stick to its programmed schedule or allow us to reprogram it. We got it through a pilot program with our utility and it was free and it was pretty good when it was working. But it was produced by GE and a couple of years ago, GE decided they were no longer going to update or support the app that they designed to go with the thermostat. It still worked fine but we couldn't use the app to change things, then this past winter, the programming function stopped completely. It wasn't bad during the winter when we could just set it manually and not worry about it but once spring rolled around the big swings in the temps meant we were always getting up to turn on the furnace or turn off the furnace or occasionally turn on the AC or when we would be away for a long time we'd come home to find our furnace had been running all day even though it was 75º outside.

I was just planning on removing the thermostat and putting the old one, that I never threw away, back on myself but on a whim I called our utility to complain about the thermostat they gave me... 5 or 6 years ago. To my surprise, they said they'd send me a $100 Visa card and give us a $100 credit on our account. Score!

I decided to put the money towards a new programmable Nest thermostat. I installed it Saturday, and after struggling to make all the wires flush enough with the wall that the faceplate would sit without continually popping off :-{ , everything seems to be working great!
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
11,251
Points
52
12 cubic yards of mulch doesn't sound like a lot on paper but it's definitely a lot when it's dropped in a pile on your driveway. I'm about 2/3rds of the way done spreading it around the gardens; the hard work of trimming back the old shrubbery and flowers, pulling weeds, and edging the garden beds is mostly done so the last bit of the mulch should go down much faster. After working all evening Friday and all day Saturday and Sunday, I needed a break on Monday. I was definitely sore. No matter how much I work out or how good of shape I think I am in, a couple days of gardening always just kicks my a55! I'm convinced that gardening uses muscles you never use otherwise.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
15,531
Points
60
I'm convinced that gardening uses muscles you never use otherwise.
Yep. Time for a Victory Garden for you to keep you in shape. :D

I have decided to stop mulching and just let the grass over take the areas on the plants/shrubs.

I hate mulching and refuse to do it any more...and support the corrupt landscaping industrial complex. ;)
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
11,251
Points
52
I have decided to stop mulching and just let the grass over take the areas on the plants/shrubs.

I hate mulching and refuse to do it any more...and support the corrupt landscaping industrial complex. ;)

I only do the heavy duty mulching every other year because it's so much work, but it always looks so nice when it's all done. My wife always complains when I do it that it takes up too much of my time, it's a waste of money, etc., etc. but she too always comes outside afterwards and says it looks great. Then on the years I don't mulch, she complains that it doesn't look so nice.
 

Veloise

Cyburbian
Messages
6,066
Points
37
I only do the heavy duty mulching every other year because it's so much work, but it always looks so nice when it's all done. My wife always complains when I do it that it takes up too much of my time, it's a waste of money, etc., etc. but she too always comes outside afterwards and says it looks great. Then on the years I don't mulch, she complains that it doesn't look so nice.

Don't you have any juvenile labor that could be conscripted? Use your snow toys to transport from the pile to the final resting place. (Don't forget the newspaper layers underneath, to bust the weeds.)

My father was the gardener, and he'd issue us our own gladiolus bulbs, a set of kiddie tools, etc. It stuck.

13240491_10153621794089562_8977383494375557970_n.jpg
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
11,251
Points
52
Don't you have any juvenile labor that could be conscripted? Use your snow toys to transport from the pile to the final resting place. (Don't forget the newspaper layers underneath, to bust the weeds.)

My father was the gardener, and he'd issue us our own gladiolus bulbs, a set of kiddie tools, etc. It stuck.

My oldest is 6 and a half and she did a fair amount of work (removing the big rocks from the flower beds so I could get mulch underneath, raking, pulling some weeds, and helping plant flats of petunias in a few spots) but even though I complain, I enjoy the quiet time when I'm working alone in the gardens. If my daughter just a little bit older (and/or bigger) she'd happily be more help. My problem is that I get very particular about how the weeding and trimming and edging are done and 6 year olds just don't cut it!

My neighbor did offer up her 14 year old daughter to come work in my yard for cheap during the weekend and towards the end I was sort of regretting not taking her up on that.
 

kjel

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
12,634
Points
44
Our old thermostat recently bit the dust and would no longer stick to its programmed schedule or allow us to reprogram it. We got it through a pilot program with our utility and it was free and it was pretty good when it was working. But it was produced by GE and a couple of years ago, GE decided they were no longer going to update or support the app that they designed to go with the thermostat. It still worked fine but we couldn't use the app to change things, then this past winter, the programming function stopped completely. It wasn't bad during the winter when we could just set it manually and not worry about it but once spring rolled around the big swings in the temps meant we were always getting up to turn on the furnace or turn off the furnace or occasionally turn on the AC or when we would be away for a long time we'd come home to find our furnace had been running all day even though it was 75º outside.

I was just planning on removing the thermostat and putting the old one, that I never threw away, back on myself but on a whim I called our utility to complain about the thermostat they gave me... 5 or 6 years ago. To my surprise, they said they'd send me a $100 Visa card and give us a $100 credit on our account. Score!

I decided to put the money towards a new programmable Nest thermostat. I installed it Saturday, and after struggling to make all the wires flush enough with the wall that the faceplate would sit without continually popping off :-{ , everything seems to be working great!

I installed a Nest about 18 months ago and really like it. I think it makes the house more consistently comfortable. I don't save much during the winter, but summer is where the savings occurs. The auto-away feature is nice and I can also lock out the other household occupants :)

I've been doing little things around the house, worked a lot on my little backyard and painted my front door and installed new hardware on it.
 

AG74683

Cyburbian
Messages
7,171
Points
40
I bought a new mailbox post and mailbox this weekend. Haven't installed it yet, but I don't think it'll be too hard.

url


I think the planter on the back may run up against a bush I have behind the current mailbox, I may need to move it over a bit from where it is now. I've been driving my sister's Subaru Impreza for the last month or so while she is away. That thing fits quite a lot of stuff in it, including a 6' 4x4 post.
 

AG74683

Cyburbian
Messages
7,171
Points
40
I bought a new mailbox post and mailbox this weekend. Haven't installed it yet, but I don't think it'll be too hard.

url


I think the planter on the back may run up against a bush I have behind the current mailbox, I may need to move it over a bit from where it is now. I've been driving my sister's Subaru Impreza for the last month or so while she is away. That thing fits quite a lot of stuff in it, including a 6' 4x4 post.

Installed the post this weekend finally. It was a lot more work than I thought. Digging a 30" deep hole was kind of a pain. It looks really nice, but I'm torn between a white mailbox or a black one.
 
Last edited:

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
11,251
Points
52
Installed the post this weekend finally. It was a lot more work than I thought. Digging a 30' deep hole was kind of a pain. It looks really nice, but I'm torn between a white mailbox or a black one.

Digging a 30' hole for a mailbox post seems like overkill. You probably could have saved yourself some trouble and just gone about 30" instead. :D
 

AG74683

Cyburbian
Messages
7,171
Points
40
Digging a 30' hole for a mailbox post seems like overkill. You probably could have saved yourself some trouble and just gone about 30" instead. :D

It kept getting hit, decided to make sure it was 100% permanent. :lmao:. Realistically, even 30" seemed like overkill. It is full of 2' of concrete too.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
11,251
Points
52
It kept getting hit, decided to make sure it was 100% permanent. :lmao:. Realistically, even 30" seemed like overkill. It is full of 2' of concrete too.

Yeah, I thought 30" sounded like a lot too! I would have probably gone 18" and called it a day.

I remember when the local utility put in new electric poles at my parents house when I was younger, they came around and with cut up portions of the old wooden electric poles and sunk one at the end of everybody who wanted one's driveway for them to use for mailboxes and newspapers. My parents' has been hit by the snowplow truck many times but hasn't budged.
 

AG74683

Cyburbian
Messages
7,171
Points
40
It's done. It's finally freaking done. This was easily the worst project I've ever done. It took forever.
fcc5323907557a5cacc12abceea7d144.jpg
21dac96d2c01b9cc37d92e218ee6cf1b.jpg
 
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