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Home Improvement

AG74683

Cyburbian
Messages
5,344
Points
19
The room has apparently been painted, and I guess I am some sort of wizard at patching walls. I haven't seen it yet but I understand that it is really nice.

A bunch of tiles fell of the wall in the guest bathroom the other night too I guess. I expected it to happen, they've been loose for a long time. I hate them anyway and planned on ripping them all off eventually.
So it looks like the tile was attached directly to plywood presumably screwed directly to the wall studs. I'm not sure it's exterior grade, but I can't see any signs of mold or anything like that. When I do actually get around to redoing that bathroom I plan to take the plywood out and use concrete board instead.

How hard is a standard bathroom renovation? I need to replace:

Vanity (something smaller, the one in there is too big for such a small bathroom).
Bathtub surround (it's an old vinyl piece of junk. Tub is really nice though, enameled cast iron, I'll probably tile around the tub).
Floor (crappy outdated vinyl junk).
Wallpaper and wall tile (I'll probably either keep the entire thing as painted drywall rather than replace the tile).

I'd rather not hire a contractor and pay the premium to do all of this. It doesn't seem THAT hard, just time consuming.
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
11,301
Points
32
It doesn't seem THAT hard, just time consuming.

You just hit the proverbial nail on the head.

It's really not that hard and you can probably do it with what you have listed. If there was electrical or plumbing involved, that's another story. Remember (as with any project) you'll be making extra runs to Lowes/Home Depot. When I redid my bathroom, the hardest part was getting the tub upstairs.
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
13,133
Points
31
The only difficulty I had in my remodel was the new cabinet was bigger than the old one so I had to shift some plumbing around to make it work.
 

dandy_warhol

Cyburbian
Messages
8,861
Points
27
Hubby and I are trying to get the house ready to put on the market. What a nightmare. So many little annoying projects that are turning into bigger projects.
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
1,273
Points
21
Hubby and I are trying to get the house ready to put on the market. What a nightmare. So many little annoying projects that are turning into bigger projects.
That was paralyzing for us. Right after we started to tackle the ~$35k of repairs/upgrades we figured we'd need to put the house on the market, we went to an open house and found some realtors who "know people" who like to buy houses "in the raw"- rental companies, flippers and the like, and ended up getting an offer of market value minus $35k. We were able to get the money out of the old house without doing the work which was awesome.
 

Bubba

Cyburbian
Messages
4,452
Points
24
Pro tip - when pulling a nail out of a wall (that was inserted into a stud behind the drywall), do not stand directly in front of it in case it suddenly releases and the hammer you're using flies back into you forehead. Concussions suck.

Hubby and I are trying to get the house ready to put on the market. What a nightmare. So many little annoying projects that are turning into bigger projects.
My sister and I are putting our late parents' house (our childhood home) on the market "as is" - all we're having done is cutting back some shrubs and pressure washing.
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
1,273
Points
21
My sister and I are putting our late parents' house (our childhood home) on the market "as is" - all we're having done is cutting back some shrubs and pressure washing.
Did you talk to the realtor about how best to showcase the house?

The house we bought last year was in the same boat: same family owned it since 1962, finally convinced the dad to move into assisted living (mom was already in Alzheimer care). So now they're back together and she can get the treatment she needs. Anyway, the kids had a realtor come in. They painted the outside, removed carpets and refinished the hardwood floors. Then they had the house cleaned, top to bottom.

We could see things that needed to be done but the house looked really nice. I'm sure they basically just did what the realtor advised them to do.
 

Bubba

Cyburbian
Messages
4,452
Points
24
Did you talk to the realtor about how best to showcase the house?
The two items I mentioned were the only two firm suggestions she had. Overall the house and its systems are in great shape, and we're having it cleaned on a regular basis...it'll be a great deal for someone looking for a 3 br/2 ba house with a kitchen they can update.
 

Richmond Jake

Cyburbian
Messages
18,206
Points
41
It is now day eight since the contractor has been here or contacted use regarding the repairs to the exterior of our home. :cursing:
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
1,273
Points
21
Yeah, I've found that home contractors are often like that. They overbook some, then try to squeeze everything in to ensure they're working. If you expected contact in the next couple of days and he's blowing you off, my guess is that bigger jobs are pushing yours out. Might be worth it to talk to other contractors.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
17,162
Points
51
An example of extreme home improvement in a hot neighhborhood in a hotter lifestyle city. This is the very first house I ever owned. It had 2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, a 1 car garage, and around 850-875 ft2 of living area. Today, it has 5 bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms, a 2 car garage, and about 2,600 ft2 of living area.

Holy shit.

I spent months stripping paint off the woodwork. Looks like they painted it over. I should post some "before" pictures, when I sold the place.

At least the place is still standing. The surrounding neighborhood is teardown central.
 
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