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I took pictures comparing the four pics of the kitchen from the real estate listing for when we bought the house last year to see the full before and after.

Before 1


After 1- I retook the pic I posted yesterday


Before 2


After 2


Before 3


After 3


Before 4


After 4


And some views that weren't in the listing.

Looking toward the living room at the front of the house


The new IKEA cabinets


The wall behind the new cabinet was at one time an exterior wall with a door and a window. It's now an open doorway to the foyer. The foyer used to be an open back porch but the previous owner of the house enclosed the porch to provide a continuous connection to the family room (formerly a garage) off to the right.


Foyer, looking from the family room. The kitchen is a step up to the left. The window that opens inside to the foyer has another one next to it that opens outside. The room on the other side of the window is my wife's office. That's her "full service window" where she can issue commands to me when I'm in the family room.


I got fancy and painted the ceiling robin's egg blue because I saw an article saying they used to do that with porches in the south. I thought it would be a neat touch.
 
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Planit

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Nice job Doohickie.

The ceiling of our front porch is indeed painted pale blue.
(I probably should've said 'Carolina Blue' because of where I live, but I am not a 'heels fan)
 
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Everything looks awesome @Doohickie

I really like those chairs that you used. We had planned to start a remodel of our kitchen this past fall, but we just didn't have the energy to sit down and start planning it. Maybe this year...
 
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We had planned to start a remodel of our kitchen this past fall, but we just didn't have the energy to sit down and start planning it. Maybe this year...
We were able to dive right in because we bought the house last year and really we needed to get this done to make the kitchen functional; it quickly became the plan once we bought the house.

The steps were basically: tear out the existing laminate (yes, those tile looking things were laminate like Pergo), then paint, which took a while but was minimally disruptive.

Then some time passed because we hit that same wall you refer to- the floor and the cabinets would be very disruptive. We bought the laminate in September but didn't get around to putting it in until after Christmas; it went down quicker than I thought. Then we had to figure out what we were getting for cabinets. We tried to look at it in the IKEA catalog online but in the end we went to IKEA with a general idea and one of their people planned and ordered all the parts we needed and we took all the stuff home that day. My son and I assembled and mounted the cabinets the weekend after New Years.

The following week was spent attending to details- a lot of trim work. Some of the stuff I did, I had a general idea of what I wanted to do but changed things up at the last minute. Challenges of installing the cabinet included how to trim out the window-like opening to the foyer, and how to deal with the electrical to get plugs to the new counter top. I had some very elaborate ideas for the opening but in the end I went simple: Just a board kind of like a window sill, painted white matching the rest of the trim.

The electrical is one aspect I'm not particularly proud of. It's probably not to code, but it should be perfectly safe. There is a four-plug outlet built into the backsplash over the new cabinet. I ended up making a spice rack over it because I didn't put it into the wall itself, the electrical box is in front of the wall. There's a plug behind the cabinets and I cannibalized an extension cord to connect from that outlet (hidden by the cabinet) to the plug on the backsplash. So it's basically a built-in extension cord. You can see the spice rack with the outlets built in, in the pic marked "New IKEA cabinets" and the one after that. If you open the bottom middle drawer, you can see the outlet- I cut a hole in the back of the cabinet to access it. I laid the cord in when we hung the cabinets, then finished out the spice rack including the new outlets afterward. I left the wire unplugged until I was done on top.
 

AG74683

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I discovered my guest bathroom toilet is leaking. This is somewhat of a problem because the actual drain hardware (overflow, flush tube, and flapper mount) are all molded into the tank, they aren't a separate piece. Unfortunately it looks like the flapper is some weird size, 2 and a half inches rather than a standard 2 or 3. I suppose I could try and replace the tank, but I've got no clue if I can even find one that fits this old toilet. It's probably from 1985 or so.
 

kjel

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I discovered my guest bathroom toilet is leaking. This is somewhat of a problem because the actual drain hardware (overflow, flush tube, and flapper mount) are all molded into the tank, they aren't a separate piece. Unfortunately it looks like the flapper is some weird size, 2 and a half inches rather than a standard 2 or 3. I suppose I could try and replace the tank, but I've got no clue if I can even find one that fits this old toilet. It's probably from 1985 or so.
If the toilet is that old, you'd be better off putting in a new one which will be more water efficient. Select one that has components that can be easily replaced as needed.
 

AG74683

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If the toilet is that old, you'd be better off putting in a new one which will be more water efficient. Select one that has components that can be easily replaced as needed.
My thoughts too. I was just hoping to wait until I decided to renovate that bathroom to get a new toilet. I'm always hesitant doing work like that too because who knows what the flange condition is, much less the floor joists underneath. If it's been leaking that will be a problem.
 
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The contractor finished taping and mudding the dry wall this morning. They're returning tomorrow to texture. Monday they paint. At that point, the interior of our house should be restored. :D
 

AG74683

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I think I'll attempt the toilet replacement this weekend. I'd really like a one piece toilet but they're expensive and it looks like a round bowl one piece is expensive. I'll have to keep with the round bowl over elongated, the bathroom is just too small to fit the elongated.
 
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Have fun with that. I've removed and reinstalled toilets. Once you get the current toilet off, make sure the bolts to reinstall the toilet are solidly attached. If the flange is rusted you may need to put on a replacement flange.
 

AG74683

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Have fun with that. I've removed and reinstalled toilets. Once you get the current toilet off, make sure the bolts to reinstall the toilet are solidly attached. If the flange is rusted you may need to put on a replacement flange.
The flange should be ABS, so I'm not worried about a rusted flange. I can see the sewer line from underneath in my basement. I am worried about a cracked flange though. I had that problem on my other toilet and had to buy a repair kit and drill new holes in the flange to make it work. I'm just worried that it may have been leaking from underneath and wrecked some floor joists. I see no obvious signs of that, but with my luck on this house, it's happened.
 

AG74683

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On the topic of toilets, how long will it be before you start seeing outlets down at toilet level next to the throne? These heated seats and powered bidets need a plug, and running it up to the sink location looks like junk. I wonder if current electrical code addresses that.
 
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