• It's easy to sign up and post! Register with a working email address (we won't give it to others, or spam you), or through Facebook, Twitter, or a Microsoft ID. Google and LinkedIn coming soon. 🙂
  • If you're returning to Cyburbia, your old password should still work with your username. If you can't remember your password, you can reset it here. If your email changed, or you can't get into your account, follow these instructions.

Home Improvement

kjel

Super Moderator
Moderator
Messages
11,248
Likes
8
Points
27
#61
Can anybody recommend an effective product to remove wallpaper? It's not actually wallpaper but a paper trim where the wall intersects the ceiling. Our master bathroom currently looks like hell. :not:
What have you done to it so far?
 
Messages
3,065
Likes
0
Points
0
#63
All the printed surface is easily removed and most of the backing. But there is some stubborn backing that won't come off. I've been using a putty knife for scraping purposes.
water and putty knife... and patience. and they call it 'strippable' wallpaper! My first house had the ceilings papered.
 

kjel

Super Moderator
Moderator
Messages
11,248
Likes
8
Points
27
#64
All the printed surface is easily removed and most of the backing. But there is some stubborn backing that won't come off. I've been using a putty knife for scraping purposes.
You can try spraying it with a 50-50 mix of vinegar and hot water, let it sit for a while to soften it up then scrape it-use a rounded edge scraper.

What are you planning to do with the wall afterwards?
 

Gedunker

Mod
Moderator
Messages
10,335
Likes
5
Points
26
#65
You can try spraying it with a 50-50 mix of vinegar and hot water, let it sit for a while to soften it up then scrape it-use a rounded edge scraper.

What are you planning to do with the wall afterwards?
Whether you use the vinegar/water, or the DIF, the essential part is highlighted above. I'm talking five to seven minutes working time. Then you can scrape it off pretty easily.
 
Messages
18,135
Likes
4
Points
34
#66
water and putty knife... and patience. and they call it 'strippable' wallpaper! My first house had the ceilings papered.
You can try spraying it with a 50-50 mix of vinegar and hot water, let it sit for a while to soften it up then scrape it-use a rounded edge scraper.

What are you planning to do with the wall afterwards?
I have matching paint for the room to paint where the paper was hung.

Whether you use the vinegar/water, or the DIF, the essential part is highlighted above. I'm talking five to seven minutes working time. Then you can scrape it off pretty easily.
Patience? Let it sit for a while? Five to seven minutes? Clearly you people have not met me. I have the patience of a gnat.

I went with Piranha liquid spray remover. It got mixed reviews on the Home Depot and Lowe's interwebs sites. Here's my experience this morning: 1) make sure the paper is well scored, 2) dampen all the paper with Piranha, don't leave anything dry, 3) when spraying have paper towels handy to wipe up drips, 4) wait about 30 seconds (not the 15 minutes on the instructions) and start scraping. It came off very easy. I recommend the product.

Maybe I'll start painting tomorrow...I hate painting.
 

kjel

Super Moderator
Moderator
Messages
11,248
Likes
8
Points
27
#67
I have matching paint for the room to paint where the paper was hung.



Patience? Let it sit for a while? Five to seven minutes? Clearly you people have not met me. I have the patience of a gnat.

I went with Piranha liquid spray remover. It got mixed reviews on the Home Depot and Lowe's interwebs sites. Here's my experience this morning: 1) make sure the paper is well scored, 2) dampen all the paper with Piranha, don't leave anything dry, 3) when spraying have paper towels handy to wipe up drips, 4) wait about 30 seconds (not the 15 minutes on the instructions) and start scraping. It came off very easy. I recommend the product.

Maybe I'll start painting tomorrow...I hate painting.
Make sure you wash the wall down with a damp sponge or cloth very well to get all the glue residue off and then make sure it's completely dry. Proper surface preparation is the key to a good looking long lasting paint job.
 
Messages
18,135
Likes
4
Points
34
#68
Make sure you wash the wall down with a damp sponge or cloth very well to get all the glue residue off and then make sure it's completely dry. Proper surface preparation is the key to a good looking long lasting paint job.
Does this take long? 8-! :eek:|




I think I did a good job on the clean up.
 
Messages
10,075
Likes
0
Points
0
#69
I am dealing with the same issue in our front hall. It was papered by the prior owner. It appears as if they papered over older paper in part of the hall, or at least the wallboard underneath is in rough shape. Even in other areas when I finally get everything off, the wall is a bit chewed up and does not have the sand texture of the remainder of the wall where there was no wallpaper. I found the best solution is the guy I plan to call next week to come in and do the work for me. I'll do the final painting and put my energy into replacing the doors.
 
Messages
18,135
Likes
4
Points
34
#70
...... I found the best solution is the guy I plan to call next week to come in and do the work for me........
This is the best advice ever. If I ever post, "I think I can do this project," somebody call me on it because I have such limited home improvement skills.
 

kjel

Super Moderator
Moderator
Messages
11,248
Likes
8
Points
27
#71
This is the best advice ever. If I ever post, "I think I can do this project," somebody call me on it because I have such limited home improvement skills.
I was going to tell you that but figured you'd get mad :D Don't feel bad, my other half doesn't have any skill at fixing stuff around the house or putting anything together without something going wrong or injuring himself.
 
Messages
18,135
Likes
4
Points
34
#72
I was going to tell you that but figured you'd get mad :D ......
Thanks, assclown. ;) I love you too.

Anyway, I finished the painting this afternoon. The color is a good match but it's going to require another coat. More climbing the ladder and painting. :-@ But that's for next weekend.
 
Messages
8,816
Likes
0
Points
1
#73
We'll be going to the local home show next weekend to get some quotes and info on some home projects. We've been discussing finishing our basement, building a patio, and doing some dog-friendly landscaping. Or maybe just using the money for a big trip.
 
Messages
8,816
Likes
0
Points
1
#74
Our house was built in 1929. It does not have a fireplace but it does have an old chimney that runs through the middle of the house and was formerly connected to the furnace. We got a new HE furnace a few years ago and it just vents out the side of the house. The chimney is only about 4 sq ft. but those 4 sq ft would be useful in our small kitchen. If we were ever to redo the kitchen part of me wants to demo the chimney and better utilize that space. Does this sound feasible?
 

ofos

Cyburbian
Messages
8,289
Likes
0
Points
0
#75
Our house was built in 1929. It does not have a fireplace but it does have an old chimney that runs through the middle of the house and was formerly connected to the furnace. We got a new HE furnace a few years ago and it just vents out the side of the house. The chimney is only about 4 sq ft. but those 4 sq ft would be useful in our small kitchen. If we were ever to redo the kitchen part of me wants to demo the chimney and better utilize that space. Does this sound feasible?
Might be but it would be a job to take out an internal brick chimney to gain a few square feet. Somebody would have to look at how it framed in and whether removing the framing would have structural implications. Single or two-story house? You're also talking about having to close up the hole in the roof. Ready to re-roof at the same time?
 

wahday

Cyburbian
Messages
3,968
Likes
0
Points
0
#76
Ditto what Ofos said. My brother had this same kind of furnace chimney removed from the middle of his home and converted it to a laundry chute (since it went to the basement where the W/D are). I believe it was a bit tricky removing the bricks, but it is doable. And its very cool.

The other thing I will point out is that a lot of time, these spaces in older homes get used as a chase to run wires, telephone lines or even a vent for additional bathrooms – things added over time. You would want to make sure there is none of that business is going on before removing.
 

Veloise

Cyburbian
Messages
5,392
Likes
7
Points
21
#77
Floor plan software

Rather than get into removing a chimney, would it make sense to re-think the kitchen and adjacent spaces? For many years, my favorite column in the Sunday paper was by a designer who'd re-draw people's floor plans for them. Her big things were:

--to-go space (shelf), nowadays with charging stations
--landing space for groceries
--mudroom, family entrance
--visual screen for the bathroom from adjoining rooms (who wants to sit at the kitchen table and see the toilet?)

You might want some floor plan software, or the low-tech equivalent, graph paper and post-its cut to size. You could revise the wall space to contain the chimney and use the new wall to include a built-in hutch or a pass-through or broom closet. Maybe add on to the kitchen in a different way and increase the space as well as the usability. Kitchen cab places will also do this (along with lots of upselling) but they don't have the common sense acquired through living in a space.

Rebooting my kitchen was my first big project. Previously the fridge had floated in the space with the two windows, and the stove on the far opposite corner. I moved the cold storage to the solid wall next to the sink, and brought the stove over to the window wall

It just dawned on me that I would love to share some designs for you, if you want to shoot a few photos and send via FB.
 
Messages
8,816
Likes
0
Points
1
#78
Thanks for the suggestions. I'm nervous enough to not do any home renovations without consulting with a professional. It helps to be friends with the architect who sits on our Historic Pres. Commission. :)

V, our house is an American foursquare so our renovations options are somewhat limited (also due to our bank account). For the most part the flow of the house works there are just somethings that could stand some improvements. Unfortunately those somethings are big ticket items - kitchen, upstairs bathroom, basement.
 

kjel

Super Moderator
Moderator
Messages
11,248
Likes
8
Points
27
#79
Ditto what Ofos said. My brother had this same kind of furnace chimney removed from the middle of his home and converted it to a laundry chute (since it went to the basement where the W/D are). I believe it was a bit tricky removing the bricks, but it is doable. And its very cool.

The other thing I will point out is that a lot of time, these spaces in older homes get used as a chase to run wires, telephone lines or even a vent for additional bathrooms – things added over time. You would want to make sure there is none of that business is going on before removing.
I will ditto this as well after finding all of the above in my current rehab project at work. In a previous project we used it as a vent since we were unable to make it serviceable again.
 
Messages
9,068
Likes
14
Points
25
#80
Our house was built in 1929. It does not have a fireplace but it does have an old chimney that runs through the middle of the house and was formerly connected to the furnace. We got a new HE furnace a few years ago and it just vents out the side of the house. The chimney is only about 4 sq ft. but those 4 sq ft would be useful in our small kitchen. If we were ever to redo the kitchen part of me wants to demo the chimney and better utilize that space. Does this sound feasible?
The chimney runs is next to the kitchen? Open it up a bit and turn it into a brick pizza/bread oven! We have an old chimney in our garage that connects to nothing that I've always wanted to do that to. It has an iron door at the bottom of it (maybe where they could shovel in coal or something?) so for now I just use it as a place to hide Christmas and birthday gifts.
 
Top