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Land use 🕍 Hotels becoming multi family dwellings

luckless pedestrian

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Hey in the opposite trend of dwelling units becoming Airbnb's, we have hotels becoming multi family units.

Anyone dealing with this?

Issues - in an industrial zone where residential uses are not allowed, fire codes, our state subdivision law is 3 or more units (not just lots) so it's also subdivision filing ugh
 

MD Planner

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Hey in the opposite trend of dwelling units becoming Airbnb's, we have hotels becoming multi family units.

Anyone dealing with this?

Issues - in an industrial zone where residential uses are not allowed, fire codes, our state subdivision law is 3 or more units (not just lots) so it's also subdivision filing ugh

You allow hotels in industrial zones? We have some decent hotels here along with some sketchy ones that we're trying hard to improve in a variety of ways. Several of those might as well be multi-family units anyway. We also recently had a developer of "affordable housing for seniors" approach us about acquiring one of those hotels, fixing it up and renting studio type apartments to income-qualified seniors. A need for sure, but I'm not certain that's the best way to help revitalize our more urban area.
 

luckless pedestrian

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We do, as our industrial zone is also next to the airport and a major highway entrance to I-95.

We do have, what I would call, semi-transient types that currently either use hotels or Airbnb's to be here anywhere between a month to 6 months in the sales, construction and medical industries so perhaps this is what's being done here.
 

JNA

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We had a hotel adjacent to the our airport be converted to assisted living.
 

mendelman

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arcplans

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Hey in the opposite trend of dwelling units becoming Airbnb's, we have hotels becoming multi family units.
Naw.. still a huge issue here. I sounded the alarm that at least 4 multi-family apartment complexes have pretty much morhped into hotels. My boss seems complacent about it. I probably would have gone to CM about it already and tried to itemize on the agenda to have a discussion with the Council.
So no CEQA compliance...interesting.

Nope. Most of the new California housing laws are trying to make everything ministerial since no one can actually create changes to CEQA.

There is always been a caveat to exemptions, typically requiring affordability covenants, or prevailing wage, or some other BS idea that comes from housing boy Weiner (seems like a good guy, but always flawed with his top down approach).
 

dw914er

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There is always been a caveat to exemptions, typically requiring affordability covenants, or prevailing wage, or some other BS idea that comes from housing boy Weiner (seems like a good guy, but always flawed with his top down approach).
That's the challenge of creating some odd work around (and also trying to appease the construction unions) - you end up with some very complicated and convoluted processes that at times no one understands. I wish they could tackle CEQA head on, which would make everything more straight forward.
 

bureaucrat#3

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We have a few older hotels at a major interchange, about three of them have transitioned at some point to long term stay or apartments. To make matters worse, there is a growing concern that they're being used as trafficking sites. Its always been a bit of a seedy area. The older locals called it the Devil's Triangle because the three original motels all had bars/dance halls back when no one else did back in the 1970s. Now the area around it is starting to improve, but the motels keep getting rougher and rougher. We almost closed one down because the water authority was 72 hours from cutting all the water off for non-payment. Some of the owners want to get out of the business, but they cash flow and I don't think most people would be willing to reinvest unless at least half of them go away.

The police spend a good bit of time there, but I don't think they're ready to call it a public nuisance.
 

Dan

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In rural areas, I've seen a lot of what were obviously 1950s-era motels and tourist courts (with cabins!) converted into cheap apartments. I've never been inside one of those old units, so I don't know if any walls were moved, or what other kinds of internal changes might have been made.

If the areas are zoned, I have my doubts a new apartment complex would be allowed at the old motel site today. A lot of these old motels don't have public sewer or water service; it's wells and a big leach field. Many are surrounded by farms or vacant land, where an apartment complex would be "out of character".

A lot of old 1920s-era downtown-adjacent hotels in my hometown have been converted into senior apartments in recent years.

I'm surprised an industrial zone allowed lodging, I can see it happening under some very old cumulative Euclidean code, or a highway commercial/industrial district. Would rezoning be spot zoning?
 

luckless pedestrian

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It's an industrial area right next to the airport and right off I95 - pre pandemic, mostly sales people and truckers, and other traveling professionals - not as much in tourism
 

Faust_Motel

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Am seeing this in a residential area- issues are complying with density requirements of the zone and having to pay school impact fees. We would not allow this if it was in a zone that didn't allow residential uses.
 

mendelman

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...why not pivot to prevent the possibility of a big dead attractive nuisance in the community.
And this is what I mean. It was a vacant, dead hotel when I started here, was only just recently demolished (~2019) and is still a big vacant lot.

I say convert. If people don't like living in an industrial zone, well, they don't (necessarily) have to. Eyes wide open and such.

Perfect is the enemy of good.
 
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