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House hunting, 2020 pandemic edition

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
14,808
Points
51
Not much, it looks like that tree is about to snap the power lines. No garage. $78k for the midwest. $Sh!tload California.
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
12,985
Points
53
Very odd looking split level. I'd have to do something with the upper story.

Buying for the neighborhood / schools / parks, but not the aesthetic.
 

dandy_warhol

Cyburbian
Messages
9,389
Points
40
Very odd looking split level. I'd have to do something with the upper story.

Buying for the neighborhood / schools / parks, but not the aesthetic.
The inside is even more odd.

But it backs up to a nature preserve, is on a dead end street with a town Park on the end, and is walking distance to a desirable elementary school.
 

dandy_warhol

Cyburbian
Messages
9,389
Points
40
Not much, it looks like that tree is about to snap the power lines. No garage. $78k for the midwest. $Sh!tload California.
No garage is a big issue. The power lines are less precarious than the picture indicates.
 

kms

Cyburbian
Messages
6,372
Points
39
It looks as though someone converted a tiny ranch into a split level. If you like the location, offer low and make those upstairs window openings larger. Is the floor plan too wacky to work?
 
Messages
2,359
Points
20
How much would you pay for this house?
I know absolutely nothing about the house, except for what you wrote and what I can actually see. Before I'd venture to evaluate its worth, the crucial questions:
Location?
Location?
Location?
Total square footage of land that you'd outright own?
Historical, architectural, etc, other noteworthy significance of house, property, neighborhood, etc.?
 

dandy_warhol

Cyburbian
Messages
9,389
Points
40
It looks as though someone converted a tiny ranch into a split level. If you like the location, offer low and make those upstairs window openings larger. Is the floor plan too wacky to work?
I believe it was a split entry and then they converted the garage into living space and then later built on a carport.

The floor plan is pretty wacky but with some 💲💲 one could make it workable. Maybe.

The location and the backyard are the reasons for it being a contender.
 

Hink

OH....IO
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
15,709
Points
50
I am in for $60k.

In Ohio we have very little going for us, but reasonable home prices are something we have at least.

Culture though.... we are lacking in that. ;)
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
12,325
Points
52
Not sure about how much but go low enough so you can hire an architect to help make some design changes, and a landscape architect to blend the house in more

I do think backing up to dedicated open space is a key decision maker but again, it's got to be enough under what you can afford so you can throw a home equity loan back into it
 

TOFB

Cyburbian
Messages
2,458
Points
29
Enclose the carport to make a real garage.

Put in bigger windows upstairs and add shutters.

Landscaping.

Make the front door more appealing somehow.

I know this is a faux pas, but I would paint the brick.

But honestly without a garage and the crazy long driveway anywhere in the snow belt makes the house very undesirable, at least for me.
 

TOFB

Cyburbian
Messages
2,458
Points
29
Not sure about how much but go low enough so you can hire an architect to help make some design changes, and a landscape architect to blend the house in more

I do think backing up to dedicated open space is a key decision maker but again, it's got to be enough under what you can afford so you can throw a home equity loan back into it
You could always 'hire' one of those fake designer shows to do a makeover . . .
 

dandy_warhol

Cyburbian
Messages
9,389
Points
40
You could always 'hire' one of those fake designer shows to do a makeover . . .
That is part of the problem! I have seen too many of those shows and now I think we can change the exterior and floor plan in all sorts of ways! Without the budget to match. 😕
 

dandy_warhol

Cyburbian
Messages
9,389
Points
40
Not sure about how much but go low enough so you can hire an architect to help make some design changes, and a landscape architect to blend the house in more

I do think backing up to dedicated open space is a key decision maker but again, it's got to be enough under what you can afford so you can throw a home equity loan back into it
I hear ya. It has been on the market for awhile which in that neighborhood is unheard of. So I am not sure the owner will be willing to come down enough to make it work for us to make the desired changes. The outside is the least of the problems! 😳
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
28,415
Points
71
That is part of the problem! I have seen too many of those shows and now I think we can change the exterior and floor plan in all sorts of ways! Without the budget to match. 😕
Yeah, on most of those shows the couple have jobs like assistant retail manager and grad student and are limited to a paltry $450k budget.
 

MD Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
2,392
Points
35
Here's the biggest question: Are you and the rest of your family prepared to live with the house in a state of transition for some period of time? Not everyone is equipped to handle that kind of disruption and upheaval. Assuming you're planning to live in the house and renovate at the same time.
 

kjel

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
12,436
Points
40
I'd probably pass on this one. If it's sat on the market for a long time there's certainly a reason why.

When thinking about undertaking renovation work you need to ponder the cost and phasing of the work, how much you can do yourselves both in terms of time and skill, will it occur while you're living in the house, etc. I will tell you from experience that NO project ever goes off as planned and it will take more time and often more $ than you think it does.

Given you have a small child, anything you buy built before 1978 you should assume there is lead based paint and make sure any contractors that are doing work that creates dust is trained in safe lead hazard work practices and know how to effectively clean post work.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
10,483
Points
45
That house has zero curb appeal to me.
If you don't mind answering, which specific aspect of the property has zero curb appeal to you?
I ask because you might point something out that none of us thought of, and it might be something pretty important.

I've got to agree with @MD Planner here. I'd be interested to hear what somebody does find appealing about that house from that photo.

The positioning of the driveway partially ending RIGHT IN FRONT OF THE HOUSE WITH NO BUFFER :down:
The fact that it looks like it may have started out as a small brick ranch with two additions (or maybe a small split level with an upstairs addition) :down:
The too small upstairs windows that look out of scale :down:
The way the overhang wraps around and also covers the driveway and makes a sort of carport (it just seems poorly executed here) :down:
Looking at the front door, it appears that it probably opens up directly into a living room and not a foyer or some sort of entrance way (I may be wrong, but from the curb, I'll risk being wrong here) :down:
The lack of landscaping (this could potentially be fixed by the realtor taking a new picture on a less dreary day now that the weather is nicer) :down:

I don't want to sh!t all over this house but there is nothing I find appealing in that photo from the curb.


All that said, there could be real value in the location and the interior may have its qualities and most of the nits I was picking from the photo are cosmetic and changeable. And a nice thing about exterior renovations is that they can generally be undertaken with much less disruption to life inside the house than what you would experience to remodel the interior.
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,438
Points
39
This building looks like it started life as a pole barn and, over the years, transmogrified into a residence. I don't even want to call it a house because no kid would ever draw anything resembling this as "home", and that's my one true test.

I'm guessing they are asking $124,900 for it. I wouldn't give more than $75,000. But, I'm el Cheapo. :D
 

dandy_warhol

Cyburbian
Messages
9,389
Points
40
^^What KJ said.

Also you'd mentioned doing remote school this year, so this place having proximity to a school doesn't matter for a while.
Keep looking.
I understand the point but also feel this is a good year to move since I don't have to worry about her changing classes mid-year. Crazy times for sure!
 

jsk1983

Cyburbian
Messages
2,474
Points
24
They really ought to rephotograph that on a less dreary day. Nothing looks good on a cloudy day with barren trees...
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
28,415
Points
71
They really ought to rephotograph that on a less dreary day. Nothing looks good on a cloudy day with barren trees...
I look at that photo with the gray skies, plain features, and barren trees and the first word that comes to mind is bleak

EDIT:
okay, I'm going to push myself today. We must find something good to say about the dwelling in question.
1. While I'm not a fan of tri-level floor plans, the house appears to likely have adequate/comfortable square footage for a family of three.
2. I like the fact that it has a good sized covered front porch. You could put a few chairs there and sit on the porch drinking beer in relative comfort while it rains.
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
28,415
Points
71
Okay, you inspired me to do some photoshopping of my own. That house is not without hope. With a few edits we can come up with a very charming version of that house for dandy.

1596119002836.png
 

Veloise

Cyburbian
Messages
5,787
Points
32
Can you photoshop a build out of the second floor over the garage?
I can, but ...

This is my house (built 1920) and the plan view would look something like this.

I really think you're approaching the diminishing returns on modifications on this property. It's possible to turn a shack into a cathedral.

overhead roof.png
 
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