• Ongoing coronavirus / COVID-19 discussion: how is the pandemic affecting your community, workplace, and wellness? 🦠

    Working from home? So are we. Come join us! Cyburbia is a friendly big tent, where we share our experiences and thoughts about urban planning practice, planning adjacent topics, and whatever else comes to mind. No ads, no spam, no social distancing.

Hovercraft brothels?

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
28,920
Points
71
I expect you'll soon see airplane, jet, helicopter, balloon, blimp and dirigible sales soar as the skies over NZ darken with the "air platform brothel" boom. Presumably, this means that airborn signs are also exempt from regulation. Instead of seeing the Goodyear blimp flashing messages you'll see the Goodevening blimp flashing it's 'bed available - no waiting' sign.

All joking aside, this issue is associated with a sticky area of the law - jurisdiction. It used to be during Prohibition in the States lots of ports had "bar ships" which would anchor the appropriate distance from the shore and would serve alcohol. Once in international waters, admiralty law would take over and prohibition was effectively circumvented. I wonder how 'far up' one has to go to to escape local jurisdiction? Does local jurisdicition exist at all in air space?
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,995
Points
31
Fluids in a highly excited and dynamic state.

Using Bernoulli’s equation one can get an insight into this exciting issue of fluid mechanics and sociology. I just conceptualized how the physics behind the hoverbrothel work and stay in balance. You are flat on your back supported by a layer of high-pressure air below you - the hovercraft. Additionally your companion adds a zone of low pressure right above you - below your center of gravity (CG). This must be an almost weightless situation where the forces acting upon your cause a large amount of lift. Yet, stalling is inevitable. Humm...o:)

 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
28,920
Points
71
el Guapo said:
Using Bernoulli’s equation one can get an insight into this exciting issue of fluid mechanics and sociology. I just conceptualized how the physics behind the hoverbrothel work and stay in balance. You are flat on your back supported by a layer of high-pressure air below you - the hovercraft. Additionally your companion adds a zone of low pressure right above you - below your center of gravity (CG). This must be an almost weightless situation where the forces acting upon your cause a large amount of lift. Yet, stalling is inevitable. Humm...o:)

Is this just an erudite way of saying 'the bigger the (air) cushion the better the pushin'? :d:
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,995
Points
31
Maister said:
Is this just an erudite way of saying 'the bigger the (air) cushion the better the pushin'? :d:

I believe the term is the "sweeter the pushing."



Spinal Tap A to Zed said:
Big Bottom: Classic tune from 1970 album "Brainhammer"; later included on 1984 soundtrack. The band wrote the lyrics in 20 minutes (DV) to what has become Tap's most covered song, most recently by Soundgarden. Within weeks after its 1984 rerelease, the poetic yet disturbing lyrics "My baby fits me like a flesh tuxedo/I love to sink her with my pink torpedo" had become an anthem on elementary school playgrounds across the United States. Derek, on the song's effects on fans: "We got a lot of girls with big bottoms coming backstage. You get what you ask for in the world of rock 'n roll." (PE) Nigel, on the song's controversial lyrics: "It's not like we're saying women are this or women are that. We are merely making, if you like, a scientific study of the bun." David: "We do not consider the subject of this song a human being at all but merely part of one. That gives us license to be as free as we want." (SNL) In the exclusive "Talk With Tap" interview on the UK CD single of "The Majesty of Rock," the band went further, explaining that the song is "an ode to women." Nigel: "It's really our love of those creatures of the smaller version." David: "And the lower smaller version." Derek: "And the bigger, bottom part of their smaller version." David: "And just below the lower middle section of their person." Nigel: "Women will say 'Big Bottom' is sexist, but aside from women, who says it is what I'd like to know." In a 1996 interview, David explained the inspiration for the song: "I was dating a beautiful woman who went by the professional name of Lhasa Apso. Extraordinary beautiful...." Derek: "With one small exception." David: "But that exception was the inspiration. End of story." (AOL) Finally, here is why the song has so much bass. David: "All of us are great admirers of reggae music, and we all agreed that, you know, they all had this great kind of throbbing, pounding bass. It made the finest stereo equipment sound like it was broken, that's how great these bass parts were. So we just put as much bass as we could in this one, hopefully too much." See also Apso, Lhasa; Code; Philadelphia; Throats.

http://www.spinaltapfan.com/atozed/index.html
 
Top