How important are the GRE scores for PHD in Planning Programs?

Messages
2
Likes
0
Points
0
#1
I've tried searching this topic and most folks conclude that it depends on your degree program. Obviously a Physics PHD should have a high quant score.

Anyone have an idea if GRE even matters for City Planning/Public Policy PHD programs? See, my issue is that I never took the GRE because my Master in Planning program didn't require it if the undergrad GPA was a 3.5 or above. I went on to have a 3.7 overall grad gpa.

I recently took my GRE and I landed with a 150 V 142 Q ! and 4 writing. I applied to 8 phd programs and am not really sweating the GRE because I have susbstanital work experience in the field.

Any thoughts if those low scores will hurt my chances in planning?
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
12,891
Likes
49
Points
28
#2
I think they take it all into account. If you had low scores with no work experience then that might hurt you, but with experience I would think they would forgive a lot.
 

Hink

OH....IO
Moderator
Messages
14,308
Likes
34
Points
34
#3
It is also school dependent. Some schools are pretty pleased to say their applicant pool has XXX GRE score! A lot more are moving away from the "numbers are the only factor" approach and putting that as only a percentage of the overall application.

I would say reach out to some schools you are interested in and ask about how much weight they put on the GRE. If you are worried about it, don't apply to those schools. If you are going for a specialty or to work with a specific professor at a specific university, than I would ask sooner than later.

If it is an issue keep taking it until you get the score you want. If you want something specific you may have to wait until your scores meet the schools expectations.
 
Messages
2
Likes
0
Points
0
#4
It is also school dependent. Some schools are pretty pleased to say their applicant pool has XXX GRE score! A lot more are moving away from the "numbers are the only factor" approach and putting that as only a percentage of the overall application.

I would say reach out to some schools you are interested in and ask about how much weight they put on the GRE. If you are worried about it, don't apply to those schools. If you are going for a specialty or to work with a specific professor at a specific university, than I would ask sooner than later.

If it is an issue keep taking it until you get the score you want. If you want something specific you may have to wait until your scores meet the schools expectations.

Thanks! I already applied by January 15th so what's done is done. Having not needing to take the GRE in the past and ending up with a masters in planning with decent grades, I would hope, would show that I have potential in a PHD program.

Honestly, having been out of school now for 5 years with a full-time Planning gig, I would hope no serious school would expect me to get 170 on both sections of the GRE. I simply did not have time study for a GRE when I was actually working full-time as a planner. Hopefully my SOP and CV reflect that. The 142 Q score though...ouch!
 
Top