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How much is too much

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
I've hinted before at problems with an employee. Let me run this past the Throbbing Brain of Cyburbia ™ to see what you all think.

This person has the responsibility of staffing the office during normal office hours. Lately, they have left three hours early every **day. In addition, this person missed a full day the week before, took off early one other day this week, did not come in today, and informed me that they will be leaving early one day next week and not coming in next Friday. In total, this person will have been out of the office 36 hours over a three week period. I am apparently being overly hard on this person for expecting them to be in the office, on time, and not abusing breaks. I have had the "you don't understand because you don't have kids" line thrown in my face. (Both kids are in high school.)

On my side of the argument, I have a job that requires me to be out of the office several hours a week. I also need to attend 2-3 meetings every week that are outside of normal business hours. On top of that, I have a board that has made very clear that they expect the office to be open from 8-5, and has criticized me for the frequency in which it is closed. Now I find myself trying to work my calendar around that of an employee. I frequently have to decide betwween staying in the office on an afternoon when I have a night meeting, putting in fourteen hour days, or closing the office because my assistant decided to leave early.

So help me out. Am I being wrong to expect this person to take less time off? Would I be wrong to tell them not to plan to take time off on **day or **day, when I typically have meetings that can go on until midnight or will keep me out of the office most of the day? How much time is legitimately needed to spend with the (nearly adult) kids? Should I just fire them and be done with it?
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,995
Points
31
Hardass 101

Written Expectations / Warning Letter
Include documentation of prior month's work hours.
Scheduled 30 day review of performance.
Bye bye or problem solved.

"You created the kids on your time, solve their problems on your time"
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,623
Points
34
Having been on both sides of that situation, maybe find out a bit more about the issues before you judge. They may be using kids as an excuse for a deeper problem, either finacially, emotionally, or whatever. They may need to be directed to the EAP....
 

Jeff

Cyburbian
Messages
4,161
Points
27
Re: Hardass 101

el Guapo said:
Written Expectations / Warning Letter
Include documentation of prior month's work hours.
Scheduled 30 day review of performance.
Bye bye or problem solved.

"You created the kids on your time, solve their problems on your time"
I couldn't have said it better myself.

But ???? Is this person asking in advance, and receiving permission to take this time off? Or are they just leaving unannounced?
 

Richmond Jake

You can't fight in here. This is the War Room!
Messages
18,313
Points
44
I agree with EG (I once had this person working for me?)-- start the progressive dicipline routine.
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,487
Points
41
Re: Hardass 101

el Guapo said:
"You created the kids on your time, solve their problems on your time"
Cleaning off my monitor!

I'd only add to be sure to follow the personnel policy to a "T" if you see the future need for termination.

You can't let the tail wag the dog.
 

aartworks

Member
Messages
7
Points
0
Cardinal said:
I've hinted before at problems with an employee. Let me run this past the Throbbing Brain of Cyburbia ™ to see what you all think.

This person has the responsibility of staffing the office during normal office hours. Lately, they have left three hours early every **day. In addition, this person missed a full day the week before, took off early one other day this week, did not come in today, and informed me that they will be leaving early one day next week and not coming in next Friday. In total, this person will have been out of the office 36 hours over a three week period. I am apparently being overly hard on this person for expecting them to be in the office, on time, and not abusing breaks. I have had the "you don't understand because you don't have kids" line thrown in my face. (Both kids are in high school.)

Sounds like nice work, if you can get it! :D L
 

Rumpy Tunanator

Cyburbian
Messages
4,473
Points
25
Cardinal said:
How much time is legitimately needed to spend with the (nearly adult) kids? Should I just fire them and be done with it?
Fire them and be done with it. Thats what I'd like to do over here, but nobody gets fired over her unless your humping somebody's leg. I seriously would question the spending time with the high school kids, come on, do they need to have their diapers changed for them?
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
Thanks, everyone. All of this is coming up because this person is now being reviewed and counseled on performance, including hours. The hours are generally announced with short notice, often the day that they will be leaving early or at most the day before. Chet - how much time does it take to raise a kid already in high school? They should be pretty independent by now, although one is in FFA (Future Felons of America). I can accept occassionally wanting to go to a soccer game, but every game? And when you know that particular day is the worst day of the week for meetings? EG - as usual, the perfect answer. :)
 

SW MI Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
3,194
Points
26
Is it appropriate for them to just say they are leaving early? Shouldn't they be *asking*? It depends on the type of position, I guess. I have pretty free reign here, but I'm a department head and can do that.

Are they covered by comp/personal time, or are they taking it without pay?
 

Rumpy Tunanator

Cyburbian
Messages
4,473
Points
25
Cardinal said:
They should be pretty independent by now, although one is in FFA (Future Felons of America).
Future Felons of America? Isn't that like Future Farmers of America?
-I don't know about that kid, maybe they should put a shock collar on his neck.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
SW MI Planner said:
Is it appropriate for them to just say they are leaving early? Shouldn't they be *asking*? It depends on the type of position, I guess. I have pretty free reign here, but I'm a department head and can do that.

Are they covered by comp/personal time, or are they taking it without pay?
That has been part of the problem. In the past, much of this time was not accounted for on time sheets. That pretty much ended when I told payroll not to accept any time sheets without my signature. This person then switched to coming in early, allegedly skipping breaks, etc. I'd call that flextime, which is not part of the hourly employees' benefits. They get comp time, which is earned for excess hours worked at management's discretion. That is going to be made clear at our next counseling. In reality there might be 3-4 hours every month when they are asked to keep the minutes of an evening meeting, yet this person has almost a week's worth of comp time accrued.
 

ludes98

Cyburbian
Messages
1,264
Points
22
EG is on the money.

I terminated employee with the "employee improvement plan" method. The key is the employee buying into (signing on the dotted line) the goals and expectations for the improvement period.
 
Messages
7,649
Points
29
I can't answer any of your other questions, but 'time with the kids when they are teenagers" I am willing to address:

If you need that much time with the teenagers, they were either dropped on their heads in infancy or you completely blew it as a parent when they were little. (Sweeping generalization, I know, and there are exceptions.)

I homeschool and I hardly 'see' my two teenagers. They have better things to do than spend time with boring old mom. They do most of their assignments independently (except those subjects I have to actually teach -- like Algebra).

Once in a while, we have a deep heart-to-heart about the tortures that will ensue if they do not get caught up on the d*mn dishes. Other than that, they stay out of trouble.
 
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