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How will your turkey be:

H

Cyburbian
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Last night people were discussing their turkey techniques, so what are yours (I wish this could be a poll, but oh well):

Traditional (basted in the oven)
Brined
Jerked
Fried
Other

I don’t cook, but we usually just have the traditional basted in the oven way.
 

Gedunker

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Hear fried turkey can be quite tasty, although something of a risk to explode...anybody know anything about this?

We'll be having the traditional baked turkey at the in-laws. I'm getting hungry already:-D
 

H

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donk said:
What is this brined you speak of?

Brining is soaking in salt water. It does not make the meat taste salty. Instead, it changes the structure of the cells to retain moisture.
 
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Traditional, but injected with all sorts of spices, herbs, flavors.

Brining, from my understanding, is a form of marianating the turkey in a salt water-like solution.
 

giff57

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Gedunker said:
Hear fried turkey can be quite tasty, although something of a risk to explode...anybody know anything about this?


I fried one last year, it was great. There is some danger of the peanut oil bubbling over and reaching the propane flame. This is a bad thing if you are cooking on a flamable surface.....
 

otterpop

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I will prepare the turkey the traditional roasted way, though kicked up a notch (BAM!). Last couple Thanksgivings were had deep-fried turkey at a friend's house. It was quite a holiday scene - the women and kids inside getting the feast together and the men in the back yard in the snow and cold, huddled around a deep-fryer, drinking beer and telling hunting stories. Probably like the first Thanksgiving.
 

NHPlanner

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giff57 said:
I fried one last year, it was great. There is some danger of the peanut oil bubbling over and reaching the propane flame. This is a bad thing if you are cooking on a flamable surface.....

The key to deep frying one is to put water in your pot, with the turkey so that you can measure the level you need to put the peanut oil in at. :)
 

BKM

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Delivered by a uniformed waiter in an overpriced (but admittedly very good) restaurant.

My sister usually cooks. Recent back surgery doesn't make her too eager to undertake our usual California branch of the family feast. :( (I can cook some things. Turkeys are not one of those things :( )
 

biscuit

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The future Mother-in-law shot down my turkey frying adventure this year, and I didn't even tell her about the giant fireball that resulted from the first time I tried frying one up. I just suppose she doesn't like the idea of anyone else preparing the Thanksgiving meal in her kitchen - Not that the I would actually be setting up the deep fryer in her kitchen mind you. So I suppose we will be having a traditional basted bird tomorrow.

My fiancee told me that we would be hosting Thanksgiving at our place next year and that I could fry turkey to my hearts content. Isn't she a sweetheart...
 

Gedunker

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giff57 said:
There is some danger of the peanut oil bubbling over and reaching the propane flame. This is a bad thing if you are cooking on a flamable surface.....

Nicely understated ;-)
 

Richmond Jake

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Traditional bird with the traditional trimmings. Will include standing outdoors in the snow during half-time of the football games consuming beer and wine and smoking of cigars.
 

SlaveToTheGrind

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My mom always cooked the bird in a turkey roaster and stuffed the turkey. My mother in law refuses to do this but the stuffing is so much better and I have never became sick since you are advised not to do this. I would like to try the deep fried turkey, however. But this Thanksgiving, I will be at my in- laws (6 miles away). Long drive, I know. Dinner at their house, desserts at our house. Football in between. Hope CFFL's Plankton's Lions can beat the Packers to help my Vikings.
 

giff57

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NHPlanner said:
The key to deep frying one is to put water in your pot, with the turkey so that you can measure the level you need to put the peanut oil in at. :)

That is what I do, but apparently the concept is lost on some.
 

Tranplanner

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Damn, I could really go for a turkey dinner right now. You may send any and all leftovers to me.

Is anyone going the tofurkey route? I've always wanted to try that.
 

The Irish One

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Is anyone going the tofurkey route? I've always wanted to try that

Now that you mention it, yes I am. If you do ever go the Tofurkey route make your own gravy rather than their packaged stuff. Do follow their basting and marinade instructions because they are very tasty! Also, try to make a Tofurky before a holiday meal, so you know if it's what you're looking for.

http://www.tofurky.com/recipes.htm
 

mcmplans

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Having deep fried turkey at my parent's house. My dad has been deep frying birds all day for family and friends (he is currently on #18 with 2 more to go before he is done).
 

ecofem

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One fried, one traditionally baked by my mother-in-law.

Both turkeys were raised by my uncle-in-law who is famed in the Panhandle of Florida for his yugo-sized turkeys. He claims they are steroid-free... I suspect he's been slipping them some Red Dog Beer (or something equally scary).
 

plannerkat

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ecofem said:
One fried, one traditionally baked by my mother-in-law.

Both turkeys were raised by my uncle-in-law who is famed in the Panhandle of Florida for his yugo-sized turkeys. He claims they are steroid-free... I suspect he's been slipping them some Red Dog Beer (or something equally scary).

Where in the Panhandle? I have a frightening number of relatives throughout that part of the state. Many of them are quite frightening as well!

On a side note, there is a documentary called "Vernon, Florida" that features a turkey hunter in that freaky little town.

And we'll be going the traditional roasted route, prepared by my amazing cook of a grandfather.
 

ecofem

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The turkey-raising uncle-in-law lives in Wakulla County, just south of lovely Tallahassee.

Luckily the above-mentioned uncle lives in the middle of hundreds of acres of planted pines... so turkey-stench isn't bothersome to the neighbors. :)
 

Chet

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Tranplanner said:
You may send any and all leftovers to me.

Not a chance! The best turkey is leftover turkey pan fried in butter on toasted wheat bread. *drool*
 

ilikefish0

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baked and microwaved *at the same time!*

the thing is like the new shimmer of ovens. upper oven is both an oven and a microwave, so both get used. (not my idea)
 

Mud Princess

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If I was the one cooking, I'd probably try the Tofurkey. I've had the Tofurkey cold cuts and they're pretty good.

My in-laws are not vegetarians, but they are very accommodating. We're having shrimp. Yummy.
 
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